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Your Teen Wants to Work: The Pros & Cons of an After-school Job

As your teen gets older, it’s normal for them to want to start making their own money. As their parent, you might even encourage it! They can sta

As your teen gets older, it’s normal for them to want to start making their own money. As their parent, you might even encourage it! They can start to buy their own clothes, pay for gas for their car, etc. Embracing the character-building and financial benefits of an after-school job can be very beneficial.

Still, it is wise to acknowledge that there are some arguments against after-school jobs for teenagers, too.

Whether your teenager has been asking to work an after-school job or you’ve been trying to find one for them, it’s important to understand the pros and cons.

First, do keep in mind that this article is simply a guideline. The pros and cons of a job should be heavily-based on your teen’s circumstances, and the needs of your family.

Earning Money

One of the biggest reasons teens often want to work an after-school job is to make some extra cash. This is especially true if they’re driving already. A job offers them a reward they can use to have fun with their friends, buy things they want, and express some personal independence, and contribute to the family budget.

Your child’s willingness to earn an income signals a shift away from the financial responsibilities being solely yours. Obviously, you’ll still pay for the majority of your teen’s larger expenses since most after-school jobs don’t pay more than minimum wage. However, part-time work is a great way to eventually transition your child into making their own money and learning how to spend it responsibly.

Saving for Goals

Along with instant “spending money,” having a job after school teaches your teen how to save. You can encourage them to set financial goals for themselves. As a result, they can start saving a portion of their paychecks to reach those goals.

Many teens work after school to start saving money for college. Others save for a car or other large expenses. Being able to save money is an important life skill that benefits everyone. Teaching your teen those skills and benefits now will make it easier for them to adopt healthy financial habits later.

Gaining Experience

An after-school job is also a great way for your child to gain real-world experience in the workforce. It will also help them to learn and apply professional behavior. Something as simple as showing up to work on time and “clocking in” appropriately helps when it comes to accountability and responsibility.

If your child has an after-school job, they can take the skills they learn there and continue to use them through college, or whatever they choose to do after high school.

Conflicting School Schedules

One of the biggest drawbacks to teens having after-school jobs is that it can often interfere with school activities.

Is your teenager involved in a lot of extracurricular activities? If so, they may not be able to work and keep up with everything they want to do. Keep in mind that many extracurriculars look great on a college application. They also help your child become more well-rounded and engaged with peers.

When your teen works a lot of hours at a job after school, they might also start to struggle with their schoolwork. Or, they could fall behind, homework, group projects, and other educational priorities. It’s important to find a balance between the two. For some kids, that just isn’t realistic.

Is An After-school Job Right for My Teen?

An after-school job is a great way for your teenager to gain experience. They’ll also make connections with people, and learn what the working world is all about. As a bonus, they’ll even start to understand the value of a dollar!

But, employment is not the right fit for every teen. If you have a teen who is very active in their extracurricular events, or who might easily fall behind in their schoolwork, a job might not be the best fit for them right now.

One of the best things you can do is to talk with your teen about some of these pros and cons. Don’t be afraid to work with them to come up with the best possible solution. Chances are, as you work through a list of advantages and disadvantages together, the right answer or compromise will come to both of you.

If you need help setting goals, brainstorming ways to ensure that education and work stay balanced, or discussing how to maximize time at school or doing school work, please contact me soon.

rt to buy their own clothes, pay for gas for their car, etc. Embracing the character-building and financial benefits of an after-school job can be very beneficial.

Still, it is wise to acknowledge that there are some arguments against afterschool jobs for teenagers, too.

Whether your teenager has been asking to work an afterschool job or you’ve been trying to find one for them, it’s important to understand the pros and cons.

One of the biggest reasons teens often want to work an afterschool job is to make some extra cash. This is especially true if they’re driving already. A job offers them a reward they can use to have fun with their friends, buy things they want, and express some personal independence, and contribute to the family budget.

Your child’s willingness to earn an income signals a shift away from the financial responsibilities being solely yours. Obviously, you’ll still pay for the majority of your teen’s larger expenses since most afterschool jobs don’t pay more than minimum wage. However, part-time work is a great way to eventually transition your child into making their own money and learning how to spend it responsibly.

An afterschool job is also a great way for your child to gain real-world experience in the workforce. It will also help them to learn and apply professional behavior. Something as simple as showing up to work on time and “clocking in” appropriately helps when it comes to accountability and responsibility.

If your child has an afterschool job, they can take the skills they learn there and continue to use them through college, or whatever they choose to do after high school.

One of the biggest drawbacks to teens having afterschool jobs is that it can often interfere with school activities.

Is An Afterschool Job Right for My Teen?

An afterschool job is a great way for your teenager to gain experience. They’ll also make connections with people, and learn what the working world is all about. As a bonus, they’ll even start to understand the value of a dollar!

If you need help setting goals, brainstorming ways to ensure that education and work stay balanced, or discussing how to maximize educational time, please contact me soon.

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You have a voice and a say in this world! Join the conversation about Universal Afterschool and Summer by submitting your story to the Vermont Youth Vision Board , as designed by the State Youth Advisory Group (made up of young people). It offers a way to hear from young people like yourself across Vermont about what life is like for you in your community right now, what programs and opportunities you would like to see afterschool and over the summer, and what other resources and supports would really make a difference. All Vermont youth ages 12-18 are invited to participate. Also, if you are interested in youth advocacy and want your voice heard, join one of the youth councils around the state. You deserve a great summer and opportunities afterschool in every part of Vermont!

after school work jobs

There is a wide range of opportunities for you this summer and throughout the year! There are career exploration opportunities throughout the state, college sponsored opportunities, sports camps and clinics, academic support, jobs to earn money, outdoor experiences, and finding work you are passionate about. Below you will find lists of opportunities available throughout the state with varied opportunities you can see, click on, and join! You can also search our Vermont Program Map for job opportunities at afterschool and summer programs.

Do you want more independence by getting a new job, saving money, or making your own purchases? Join Vermont’s workforce! There are a ton of businesses interested in hiring teens. These include camps, restaurants, landscaping businesses, retail stores, and so many others. Click here for a list of Vermont businesses looking to hire teens for summer 2023 and year-round .

Looking for a job working with kids? Consider working at a learning program in your community! Check out our Vermont Program Map for job opportunities at afterschool programs. Reach out to Katie for more information.

after school work jobs

Open positions for everyone . Are you looking for something else? Here are job postings from across the state for all Vermonters of any age .

Know your rights. More information on the employment of minors can be found here . The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires “for profit” employers to pay employees for their work. In Vermont, this means paying the state minimum wage of $12.55 per hour. To determine if one should get compensation as an intern, this fact sheet  is helpful in understanding the distinctions. If you have questions, feel free to call the Vermont Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division at (802) 951-4083 or email  Labor.WageHour@vermont.gov

Are you a Vermonter who receives Social Security Benefits (SSI or SSDI) and want to learn more about the incentives to go to work? Call the VR Work Benefits Helpline for more information (800-361-1239) or visit the Work Incentives Counseling page .

Are you starting to think about what kind of career you’re interested in and how to explore these options? See below many different career exploration opportunities and mentor programs to help in your search .

Career exploration opportunities

Register Today for Classes at CCV!

CCV offers a flexible education to fit college into your busy life. Registration for 2023 classes is open. CCV is the most affordable college in Vermont, and financial aid counselors are here to help you pay for college, from application to graduation. This fall, choose from hundreds of courses in six different formats. Enjoy small classes, flexible scheduling, and one-on-one support from instructors and advisors.

Visit CCV’s website for more information and to register !

The Career Pathways Entry Program at CCV is an on-ramp for career seekers to explore industries, participate in job shadows with local employers, gain college credit and an industry credential, and earn cash while they learn. Participating employers benefit from a diversified talent pipeline and skilled workers to fill roles in high-demand fields like manufacturing, healthcare, and human services.

Click here for more information .

If you’re a high school student with a disability, or the parent or guardian of one, and you’re ready to start thinking about life after high school, consider meeting with a HireAbility VT Transition Counselor.

Click here for more information and to register .

Advance Vermont has created Vermont’s only free, online hub for career and education resources. MyFutureVT provides you with the information and guidance you need to make informed decisions about your education and career journey. It includes 3 interactive databases, career exploration and preparation, education and training information, and career and education resources.

Visit MyFutureVT’s website for more information .

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) student opportunities database has opportunities for students of any level — from kindergarten through high school, undergraduate and graduate, and even recent graduates. Opportunities include one-day events, summer internships at NOAA, multi-year fellowships, and more. Use the filters to narrow your search and find the opportunities that work for you.

Click here to access the database .

Rosie’s Girls is a STEM, trades, and career exploration program for girls and gender-expansive youth entering grades 6-8. Participants are introduced to a career field that is non-traditional for their gender through hands-on learning in a supportive and empowering environment. In addition to trades and technical learning, Rosie’s Girls includes a social and emotional curriculum known as “Power Skills.” Four different themes are offered: Build, Weld, Explore, and Invent. Partner with Vermont Works for Women to host Rosie’s Girls once a week at your local school or community center and help girls expand their sense of what’s possible.

Click here for more info or contact Sarah Raimondi ( sraimondi@vtworksforwomen.org | 802-655-8900 x103).

Vermont 4-H is a statewide program open to all youth ages 5-18. Our fun, hands on, experiential programs offered are focused on science and technology, civic engagement and healthy living. Youth can participate in programs such as 4-H Science, Teen and Leadership Programs, UVM College Collaboration K-12 Outreach, Youth Agriculture Project, and Youth Farm Safety.

Also, check out these hands-on career exploration science pathways teen cafes – in person and virtual!

Work-based learning experiences involve student interactions with industry or community professionals in real, virtual, online, or simulated work environments that expose learners to post-secondary options, provide opportunities for skill development and proficiency attainment, and allow students to reinforce and deepen their school-based learning.  The Agency of Education’s Work-Based Learning Manual offers a variety of tools to support safe, meaningful, and sustainable work-based learning experiences for all learners. This manual is designed to assist practitioners with the development, implementation, and evaluation of well-rounded work-based learning experiences for all learners.

Target age group: Students ages 14-18+

Are you a student entering 7th-10th grade in the Fall who is interested in the environment and ready to explore, in depth, your passion for Vermont’s natural resources? 

If you answered yes to this question, then you should attend the Natural Resources Management Academy. Come ready to explore natural resources management, and share a weekend with other youth from around Vermont who have the same interests.

Click here to learn more .

VSAC advocates for students and their families to ensure that they have the information, the counseling, and the financial aid to achieve their education goals. VSAC helps people go to college and train for careers.

Follow this link to see college and career pathways resources .

Click here to see upcoming events .

Join any of a variety of courses offered by Vermont Technical College including electrical, welding, meat cutting, etc. Visit Vermont Tech’s website for more information .

VTC Working Lands Trainings are supporting farms and forests from whelping to welding, farming to food, supply chain and systems, including manufacturing. Flexible learning available. Coming up we have:

  • Food System Trainings such as artificial insemination and craft distilling .
  • Wood Products and Natural Resources Trainings such as Wetland Delineation Certificate, Arborist Certificate, and Soils and Waste Water Trainings .
  • Agriculture Manufacturing Trainings such as welding .

VYCC is all about working on a crew (a small team). You’ll work hard together and laugh a lot. You’ll help each other and be surprised at what you can get done together! Sure, you will start out as strangers. After 36 years of running crews, we can assure you, you’ll leave with friends. Our goal is to make sure you are safe and supported. Your goal will be to complete projects that make your community and the environment healthier. Crews are all about growing food, building trails, cleaning up our waterways, building efficient backcountry shelters, and/or improving forest health. Do you want to get paid to make a difference? If so, we hope you’ll join VYCC!

Click here to apply .

Vermont Youth Employment Program (VYEP) through the Vermont Department of Labor’s Workforce Development Division supports a wide variety of opportunities to ensure Vermont youth and young adults (ages 16-24) have the skills, training, and experience they need to successfully enter the workforce and find meaningful employment.

Click here to connect with our Local Career Specialists and learn more .

college sponsored opportunities

Introduction to College and Careers (ICC) provides students in 8th-12th grade with the opportunity to explore the college experience within the context of their future career goals. Students reflect upon their strengths, interests, values, and goals by focusing on three key questions—Who am I? What are the habits of effective people? What will I do after high school?—and learn about the expectations necessary to succeed in academic and professional settings. In addition to the core curriculum, students will complete four or more modules on a variety of topics, such as time management, test taking, personal budgeting and communication skills. This course also provides students with an introduction to online learning, including an overview of the College’s portal environment. CCV runs several sections of ICC throughout the summer.

Castleton is pleased to offer the very best youth sports camps in the state of Vermont and the surrounding region. Youths from Vermont, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York and beyond have all benefited from our high quality facilities, top-notch instruction, and countless hours of fun and recreation. If you are looking for a high-quality Vermont sports camp, look no further. The camps and clinics include basketball, baseball, field hockey, football, lacrosse, soccer, softball, volleyball, and wrestling.

Saint Michael’s is offering summer camps and clinics through their purple knight camps with men and women basketball, lacrosse, soccer, as well as volleyball, field hockey, and baseball.

The Northern Vermont University-Johnson Athletic Department and its coaches host many summer camps and clinics throughout the year. From the highly successful basketball, soccer, and softball camps, to our new camp additions this summer with volleyball. Youth from Lamoille County and throughout the New England region have the opportunity to learn from some of the finest coaches in the area.

Two new animal science courses are being offered in the summer of 2024 for high school students who are currently involved in or are interested in the fields of agriculture or animal science. Registration is open and there are limited spots.

Science & Medicine of Animals (July 22 – August 2, 2024) : This 3-credit course will provide students with the opportunity to integrate classroom instruction, hands-on learning and farm tours to more thoroughly understand how biology, veterinary medicine, animal behavior, and livestock management intersect. Click here for more information and to register .

Intro: Pet Care and Handling (July 22 – August 2, 2024): Embark on an exciting journey into modern pet care essentials in this 1-credit course. You’ll delve into the diverse world of companion animals, encompassing dogs, cats, fish, reptiles, amphibians, small mammals, and birds. You’ll navigate species-specific care requirements and explore contemporary best practices. Click here for more information and to register .

additional program opportunities

We’re a 1:1 mentorship program that runs year-long and have both community and site-based programs, but do not run any group programming. Our geographic range is the entire state of Vermont, with program concentrations in Windham County, Chittenden County and the NEK. We also serve a handful of children in Windsor, Addison, and Franklin counties and work with multiple school districts.

Target Age Group: Ages 6-17

Click here to register . For more information, email Big Brothers Big Sisters or call 802-689-0092.

Our vision is that every young person in Vermont has the supportive mentoring relationships they need to grow and develop into thriving, productive, and engaged adults. We provide resources and support to youth mentoring programs in Vermont so they can meet the needs of young people in their communities. We serve all counties in Vermont and all ages, you can become a mentor or a mentee.

For more information, visit Mentor Vermont’s website , email Mentor Vermont , or call 802-658-1888.

Find Your Career. You Deserve it.

Afterschool professionals spend their lives and careers instilling in youth the belief that they can achieve their goals. It’s time for you to achieve yours.

  • Latest Jobs
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Teen Coordinator (West Side YMCA)

  • YMCA of Greater NY
  • New York City, Manhattan
  • Job Posted: 05/10/2024

Summer Camp Lead Teacher (Part-Time Position: Mon 1 Jul – Fri 16 Aug 2024)

  • The Kew-Forest School
  • New York City, Queens
  • Job Posted: 05/01/2024

Director, Youth & Family (Rockaway YMCA)

  • Job Posted: 04/17/2024

Want to see more?

Posting a job.

Want to post a job to the Pathfinder website? Our free, instructional video will help answer all of your questions.

Welcome to Pathfinder

Afterschool Pathfinder is the premier career resource for New York State’s afterschool professionals. A comprehensive online forum, Afterschool Pathfinder fosters a vibrant network of afterschool organizations and workers. Sign up for a free account to connect with youth-focused professionals. Become a regular visitor to take advantage of the site’s free resources and receive updated information on job openings. Engage with this online forum to share and explore career opportunities across New York State. Each of us works in afterschool because we truly care about the youth in our communities. Find a job that fulfills you, and you will absolutely have a positive and lasting impact.

Jobseekers:

  • The more you engage with Afterschool Pathfinder, the greater the benefit. Search continually updated listings for jobs for vacancies in afterschool, expanded learning, and youth programs.

Afterschool or youth program managers:

  • Post job openings that will be seen by qualified staff. Achieve your organization’s goals and help a future colleague reach the next stage of their career.

after school work jobs

arc After School and Experiential Education

Competitive Compensation Rates

Most jobs with Arc begin at $20 per hour.

Our work is rewarding, and that includes making sure our team members are taken care of. Our staff are compensated well above industry standards and provided a competitive benefits package.

Highlights Include

  • Health Insurance
  • Dental Insurance
  • Life Insurance
  • Vision Insurance
  • 401k Retirement Plan
  • Paid Sick Leave
  • Paid Holidays
  • Flexible Spending Account
  • Employee Assistance Programs
  • Profit-Sharing
  • Pet Insurance
  • Discounted Tickets
  • Dog-Friendly Office

FEATURED POSITIONS

Program leader.

We are currently staffing several part-time Program Leader positions at various Elementary, Middle and High Schools throughout the Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley, South Bay, and San Diego areas. We are looking for highly qualified team leaders to motivate and empower the youth we serve to realize their full potential.

Site Coordinator

We are currently looking for experienced After School Site Coordinators to fill positions throughout the Greater Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley, South Bay, and San Diego areas. These highly qualified team leaders will motivate and empower the youth we serve to realize their full potential.

Traveling Facilitator

We are looking for experienced leaders to join our after school team and facilitate leadership curriculum to high school youth. Cover topics relevant to our youth while instilling basic life skills including clear communication, team building, empowerment, problem solving, trust, conflict, and more.

We serve communities throughout Southern California

LOS ANGELES     SAN DIEGO     ORANGE COUNTY     IMPERIAL VALLEY     OCEANSIDE     SAN FERNANDO VALLEY     DOWNTOWN LA     WATTS     SOUTH LA     CRENSHAW     MID-CITY     SOUTH BAY     HOLLYWOOD     SILVER LAKE     RESEDA     NORTHRIDGE     VAN NUYS     EAST LA     MAYWOOD     SOUTH GATE     VENICE     NATIONAL CITY     CHULA VISTA     SAN YSIDRO     CLAIREMONT     DOWNTOWN SD     LA JOLLA     PACIFIC BEACH     NORTH PARK     PARADISE HILLS     EL CENTRO     BRAWLEY     CALEXICO

Meet some of our stellar staff

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MEET MARTIN

Meet one of our leaders in Oceanside, Martin Arispe. Get to know why he’s passionate about his career with youth below!

Where are you from and how did you end up at arc?

I was born in San Antonio, Texas until my family moved to Oceanside, California in 1985. I had the privilege of going to Del Rio Elementary, Lincoln Jr. High, and El Camino High School in the Oceanside Unified School District. I’ve been involved with the youth community since my first kid was born. For over 24 years, I’ve coached youth sports like soccer, flag-football, baseball, and softball. I knew even then that I wanted to work with youth. I started my after school career in 2004 at the Boys & Girls Club of San Marcos at San Marcos Middle School being the Site Coordinator. From there, I knew I was in the right field of work. I wanted to give back to the city of Oceanside so I applied for  arc  in year 2014. I’m so glad they hired me!

What do you do at arc?

I am the Site Coordinator at Cesar Chavez Middle School for  arc . In a nutshell, I am responsible for being the primary point of contact for program logistics pertaining to a specific school site and act as a liaison for parents, teachers, administration, students and staff.

“IT IS SUCH A GREAT FEELING TO SEE SO MANY YOUTH LIVES ARE BEING GUIDED IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION.”

What do you love most about working with youth?

I love working with middle school students. I feel the students are like clay materials and I am the sculpture that helps mold their future. It is such a great feeling to see so many youth lives are being guided in the right direction.

What has been one of your most inspiring, coolest, or fulfilling moments while working for arc?

The coolest thing I love about arc is the Teen Adventure Challenge. I love this event because it draws a lot of students to compete against other teams from all over Southern California. It builds teamwork and unity for our youth.

What do you love most about working at arc?

The dedication that  arc  has to enrich the lives of youth.

natalie-kutches-interview

MEET NATALIE

Meet our LEAD Coordinator down in San Diego, Natalie Kutches. Get to know why she’s passionate about working with our youth below!

I am from Everett, WA but moved to San Diego to attend SDSU in 2008. After traveling, graduating college, and more traveling, I did two years of full time community service through the Baha’i Faith. During this time I learned to facilitate groups of youth, accompany other facilitators, and coordinate day and weeklong events. When I applied for a facilitator position at  arc  (and got a call for an interview 2 hours later), it seemed like a perfect fit. As I transitioned from a facilitator to a coordinator I couldn’t believe the overlap in my responsibilities at  arc  with my previous experience. It felt like a confirmation to be working here!

I am the LEAD Coordinator for the San Diego region. One of my main responsibilities is coordinate the GOALS program for all of the SDUSD high schools, and a number of middle schools just north and south of San Diego. My other major focus is to plan and execute the SD LEADS Conferences for SDUSD and SDCOE high schools. I also put together and oversee other programs such as College and Career Bound, Career Aware, and adventure trips for independent clients.

"IT WAS GREAT TO REALIZE OUR PROGRAM HAD MADE AN IMPACT IN SOMETHING SO IMPORTANT AS NAVIGATING THE FUTURE PROFESSION OF A HIGH SCHOOL STUDENT."

I love that youth can do important things without being too serious. Youth will be working on a project, a plan, or a challenging activity but still find time to make jokes with each other and have casual conversation. When working with them I feel like I am on their schedule; we will accomplish what we set out to do, but not without some time to get to know each other and having a few laughs. It allows me to be in the moment.

One of my favorite moments while working at  arc  was during our College and Career Bound program hosted at SDSU over the summer. I was walking a group of students back to our meeting spot at the park after visiting the Union Tribune, as their second job tour of the day. While one student was talking to me about how the tour host had clarified her career path and offered to connect her to the industry, I could hear everyone around me having conversations about how much they learned on their tour and how it inspired them for their future. It was great to realize our program had made an impact in something so important as navigating the future profession of a high school student.

I love the amount of flexibility and creativity that is encouraged. As my supervisor, Brenna is always encouraging me to find a solution and trusts that I will “make it work.” We have created a lot of programs from scratch and improved them little by little. She has provided for a lot of room for me to grow professionally.

Program Coordinator

1702-ryan-johnson-student-group

Meet one of our Site Coordinators for Inglewood Unified, Ryan Johnson. Get to know why he’s passionate about working with our youth below!

I was born and raised in Carson, CA. I am currently pursuing my Bachelor’s Degree at Antioch University with the hope of becoming an Elementary School teacher. I began working in the field of education in 2009 at a charter school for 2 years as a campus aide, then transitioned to after school shortly after. I had heard  arc  had taken over the school where I was once Site Coordinator. After learning more about the company, I felt that their culture would be a nice one to work in.

I am the Site Coordinator for Warren Lane Elementary School in Inglewood. In a nutshell, my duties are to shape and mold lives. The lives that I speak of are not just the students of Warren Lane, but also our Program Leaders. I want to make sure that the students are empowered to do anything they set their minds to and I try my best to do the same with the Program Leaders. While I also do the little things, like tracking attendance and turning in paperwork, the big picture of my job is to make a difference.

“YOU ENTER SOME COMPANIES AND YOU MAY NEVER CROSS PATHS WITH THE CEO OR PRESIDENT, BUT HERE THEY GO OUT OF THEIR WAY TO GREET YOU AND MAKE SURE YOU HAVE EVERYTHING AT YOUR SITE.”

I love working with the kids, interacting with all the different personalities and seeing them grow into scholars. What I love the most is being able to help them along the way. After struggling and working through something, the moment you see the lightbulb flash inside their head and finally grasp what they are being taught means the world to me.

What I love most about working at  arc  is the people. They make you feel like you belong, that you are apart of the  arc  family. You enter some companies and you may never cross paths with the CEO or the President, but here they go out of their way to greet you and make sure you have everything at your site.

diana-carrillo-profile

Meet our Director of Programs for the North Region, Diana Carrillo. Get to know why she’s passionate about working with our youth below!

I was born and raised and South Los Angeles and attended public schools my whole life. When I found out about  arc  I was going through a very difficult time in my life where I was recovering from injuries caused in a car accident. I was looking for a part time job that would help me ease back into being my normal self. Never in a million years did I think that  arc  would have the impact that it has had in my life. I was able to work with a variety of students that continuously encouraged me to be better than I was the day before. arc motivated me to be better not only for myself but for our youth.

I am a Regional Manager for K-12 after school programs. In a nutshell, my job is to develop leaders for our programs. By creating leaders, we create a program that is full of new opportunities to develop our youth. We provide a safe and fun learning environment for our students. I ensure that we meet compliance while still delivering amazing after school programming.

What I love most about working with youth is the world full of possibilities. Working with youth has taught me to reach for stars. They remind you that no matter how many times you fall, you have to keep getting up and trying. No matter how rough a day may be, youth will always help you see the brighter side. Not only do our youth need us, but we also need them. They remind you to stay strong because you are their mentor. There is never a dull day with our students and I would not want it any other way.

“THERE IS NEVER A DULL DAY WITH OUR STUDENTS AND I WOULD NOT WANT IT ANY OTHER WAY.”

The most inspiring and fulfilling moment while working with  arc  for me was to see one of my students reach their potential. She was struggling with school due to having a lot of problems at home. The family no longer knew how to help her so they reached out to me. I had built a good relationship with this student over the years and decided that I would step in and try to see how we could help after school. When I shared what my goals were in life for myself and my students she opened up and shared why she was making bad choices. We were able to get her help and that led to her being motivated again. She began checking in and helping me with everyday tasks. That then trickled down to her school work. She knew we were there for anything she needed. Things at home improved as well. One day the mother showed up to program with food for all of the staff and a touching thank you card. She let us know that we had made such a difference in their life and that her daughter had hugged her. Seeing how happy her mother over a hug made me realize that we do make a difference, whether we see it or not.

What I love most about working with  arc  is the people.  arc  to me is family. We are all always here for each other in the good and the bad times.  arc  challenges me to be better than I was yesterday.

Director of Programs, Los Angeles

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after school work jobs

Changing the odds for kids.

We want a community where all kids get a great education that prepares them for college and career.

Think Together delivers nationally-recognized after school programs, early learning, enrichment, and school improvement in close to 500 schools in California from San Diego to San Francisco – serving over 200,000 students.

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Interested in joining our passionate, teen-focused team?

After School Matters is a non-profit organization that provides enriching and engaging after-school programs to thousands of Chicago teens each year.

Our diverse and talented staff supports city-wide network of high-quality opportunities for teens to discover their potential and shape their future.

Come join our team and help us to transform the lives of Chicago’s youth.

Working at after school matters.

after school work jobs

  • Medical Insurance
  • Medical Flexible Spending Account
  • Discounted Monthly Millennium Park Garage Pass
  • Dental Insurance
  • Dependent Care Flexible Spending Account
  • Commuter Benefits
  • Vision Insurance
  • Paid Parental Leave
  • Retirement Plan

after school work jobs

After working several jobs in Chicago’s non-profit sector, I instantly felt at home working at After School Matters. I believe strongly in our Mission and Vision, helping teens in Chicago tap into their passions and find their future. That’s why I feel my efforts to align and maximize resources for ASM programs and teens can make a lasting impact in the communities we serve.

Chris Nergaard

Senior Program Director for N/NW

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CAMBA CAMBA, Inc.

Join Our Team » Current Openings » Jobs » After School Positions 2023 – 2024

After School Positions 2023 – 2024

Who We Are:  CAMBA is a community of staff, volunteers, clients, donors, neighbors and partners who work together to build an inclusive New York City. CAMBA serves more than 65,000 individuals and families each year, citywide, including almost 13,000 youth. Our 180+ programs in over 100 locations improve the lives of a diverse cross section of New Yorkers. From homelessness prevention in Staten Island to supportive housing in the Bronx; from employment training in Manhattan to after school programs and college access in Brooklyn; from family shelter and support in Queens to increasing affordable housing across the city, CAMBA provides holistic services to help struggling New Yorkers stabilize their lives and become self-sufficient.

CAMBA EYD Programs  operate after-school and summer camp programs in New York City, serving almost 2,400 children in elementary and middle schools. Programs operate during the school year, in the summer, and on most school holidays. Depending on location, we offer environmental, conservation, arts, violence and drug prevention, and music therapy programs with public and private partners.

The person filling these position are expected to, under general supervision and guidance:

Group Leaders

  • Research, develop and execute fun and engaging lesson plans (activities), to create opportunities for discovery learning, adventure, and recreation.
  • Provide group and/or individual assistance to “at-risk” children and/or youth in academic and/or nonacademic activities.

Compensation : $20.00 hourly Status: Part-time

Group Worker

  • Assist the Youth Facilitator
  • Help to establish and maintain a focused environment during and in-between various activities

Compensation : $16.00 hourly Status: Part-time

Minimum Education/Experience Required:

  • Some college
  • Experience working with youth
  • Current high school student or High School Diploma or G.E.D and/or equivalent experience

Other Requirements:

  • Doctor’s note certifying good health
  • Proof of negative results from TB test
  • State Central Registry (SCR) clearance
  • Dept. of Health fingerprint clearance (DOH)
  • Dept. of Education fingerprint clearance (DOE)

CAMBA is an Equal Opportunity Employer. We value a diverse workforce and inclusive workplace. People of color, people with disabilities, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people are encouraged to apply. We consider all applicants without regard to race, color, religion, creed, gender, gender identity, gender expression, national origin, age, disability, socio-economic status, marital or veteran status, pregnancy status or sexual orientation.

Click here to apply

Help New Yorkers in need transform their lives

Each year, CAMBA reaches more than 73,000 individuals and families , including almost 13,000 youth . Without your support, we cannot continue to create and deliver our programs.

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Bice: State Rep. Myers exited school job after numerous complaints from families

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At least state Rep. LaKeshia Myers is no longer double-dipping.

The third-term Milwaukee Democrat had come under fire for working full time both as a member of the state Assembly and as dean of students at Whitman Middle School.

But now Myers, who is running for an open Senate seat , is no longer employed by the Wauwatosa School District under unclear circumstances, meaning the district won't say if Myers, 39, was fired or quit earlier this year.

What is clear is that her departure came shortly after the school district suspended her for a variety of reasons, according to more than 800 pages of heavily redacted documents released under the open records law.

"The purpose of this letter is to inform you that the Wauwatosa School District is conducting an investigation into complaints from multiple families regarding allegations that you have failed to follow district practices regarding disciplinary investigations and have engaged in unprofessional conduct," Sarah Zelazoski , chief of talent for Wauwatosa schools, wrote Myers on Dec. 19, 2023.

"Effective immediately, you are being placed on administrative leave pending completion of the investigation."

One tipster said Myers had picked up the moniker "Dr. Doolittle" around campus.

The records do not indicate what happened after her suspension notice.

Myers did not respond to numerous calls and emails to her personal and campaign accounts.

In July 2, she will square off against fellow Milwaukee Democrat, Rep. Dora Drake , in a primary for the right to fill a Senate seat that was vacated by Lena Taylor earlier this year when Gov. Tony Evers appointed her to the Milwaukee County bench .

Myers, who earns $57,408 a year to serve in the state Legislature , was named to the dean of students post in Wauwatosa in 2022, a job that paid $75,482 annually. With the two positions, Myers was making more than $132,000 per year in taxpayer-funded income.

Others lawmakers have second jobs, but only a few work two government-paid positions.

Records suggest problems in Wauwatosa began right away for Myers, a former teacher and assistant principal .

Shortly after hiring Myers, the school district was informed that her wages needed to be garnished for outstanding debt to Concordia University . At the time, the court informed Tosa schools that Myers owed the college $1,606 in an unpaid judgment.

In April 2023, the state Department of Revenue informed the Wauwatosa school system that it needed to begin withholding 15% of Myers' paycheck because she owed $3,349 in back taxes. The state removed its hold on her wages later that year.

Those were issues outside the office.

Wauwatosa schools put Myers on a performance plan

On Sept. 8, 2023, Myers — who likes to tout her education credentials — was put on a Performance Improvement Plan by school officials just a year into her job.

"As a result of observations which have identified your performance as below expectations, the following PIP has been developed to support necessary improvement during the 2023-2024 school year," said a notice sent to Myers.

Followup documents show that Myers was coming up short in two areas: professionalism and communication/collaboration.

Under the terms of the deal, she was to provide documentation of any medical appointments that required her to leave the office; arrive at meetings on time and stay until the end of these sessions; refrain from doing personal business during the work day; and alert officials when she had to leave the school building.

(State records show that she had registered a new business called Panache Edutainment Travel shortly before being put on the plan. She also owns a farm, a consulting firm and a bingo services provider .)

The improvement plan was to stay in place until Nov. 1, 2023.

But just days before that, Tosa school officials drafted a revised improvement plan for Myers. This one focused on many of the same areas, noting her need to "maintain positive professional behavior," perform duties on time and respond promptly to student, parent and community concerns. This one was to run to Jan. 26.

Instead, Myers was notified in mid-December 2023 that she was being placed on paid administrative leave. The letter said she would be informed of the specific allegations when she sat down with district officials for an interview.

"Failure to comply with the directives provided in this letter in this letter will be considered insubordination and will be grounds for discipline up to and including termination of employment," Zelazoski wrote on Dec. 19.

The final records include exchanges of emails between Myers and district officials trying to settle on a date for her interview. The records do not make clear how the dispute was resolved.

On Jan. 5, Zelazoski declined to say if Myers had been dismissed from her job, but she did acknowledge one thing: "Dr. Myers is no longer employed with the Wauwatosa School District."

Everything else had to come through a records request, which still didn't tell the whole story even after a nearly four-month wait for the information.

The records did show that Myers referred to herself and was referred to as "Dr. Myers" in nearly all correspondence.

LinkedIn refers to law degree from Cooley Law School, but school says she didn't graduate

According to her LinkedIn page , she has two doctorates — a J.D. from Cooley Law School in Lansing, Michigan, and a doctorate in education from Argosy University .

Myers did put in her time and completed a dissertation for the Ed.D, but you will have to look long and hard to find Argosy University. The for-profit chain of 22 career schools closed its doors in 2019 after the U.S. Education Department cut off federal student loan and grant funds upon learning Argosy used $13 million owed to students to cover payroll and other expenses.

As for the law degree, Myers says she was awarded one after attending Cooley from 2019 to 2022, according to LinkedIn. Interestingly, she said the degree was "in progress" in her application to Wauwatosa two years ago.

The law school helped clear up the situation. Cooley has been dubbed the worst law school in the country by several media outlets with lowest bar passage rate among American Bar Association -accredited schools. Western Michigan University broke ties to the law school last year.

"Lakeshia N. Myers did attend with Thomas M. Cooley Law School but did not graduate," wrote Jessica Delaforce , coordinator for student records, in an email.

Contact Daniel Bice at (414) 313-6684 or [email protected]. Follow him on X at  @DanielBice  or on Facebook at fb.me/daniel.bice.

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Student Opinion

Should States Provide Recent High School Graduates With Jobs in Public Service?

Maryland has an initiative to help residents find paid work in areas like community development and public health. Tell us if such a program interests you.

Before a wall painted with a mural of an ocean, a woman in a red shirt and long gray cardigan smiles as children interact in front of her.

By Shannon Doyne

Do you know what you would like to do after graduating from high school? Are you headed to college with a major in mind or to a training program that will lead to employment in a particular field? Will you join the military, take a gap year or seek full-time work in an area with the hope that it will become your career?

If you aren’t sure, you’re certainly not alone. Would you consider a yearlong program that offers paid work, career exploration in the world of public service, a success coach to mentor you and, at the end, $6,000 to put toward your future?

Maryland has started such a program, and taxpayers fund it. In the Opinion essay “ Wes Moore’s Big Experiment for Maryland ,” Pamela Paul explains:

Taking a gap year, or devoting a year to public service, whether to develop yourself or to serve a higher purpose, can be very alluring and, just as often, very impractical: How do you find the right opportunity, or fit it into your life, and most of all, swing it financially? Gov. Wes Moore of Maryland is trying to find a way to make it work for more people. One of the centerpieces of his administration is the newly established Department of Service and Civic Innovation , which includes a public service program with two arms, the Service Year Option , for Maryland residents within three years of high school graduation, and Maryland Corps, which is open to a range of applicants. Each provides access to entry-level positions at nonprofits and state agencies, as well as a small number of businesses with a strong service component, such as public health or community development. Participants are paid a minimum of $15 per hour and provided help with transportation and child care, which could otherwise keep out those with fewer support systems. At the end of the minimum nine-month term, all participants get a $6,000 stipend toward college or to cash out for a down payment on a car, for example, or a home.

In the essay, some participants in the Service Year Option talked about the support they received:

During the pandemic, Romona Harden, 22, transitioned to remote learning after a semester and returned home to Prince George’s County. As she pursued her education, she was not sure how to go from one step to the next. She began working for a nonprofit community organization that had signed up to be a provider for the Service Year Option and then encouraged Harden to apply. “I need a mentor,” Harden wrote in her application. “I have a lot of hopes and dreams, but I need someone to push me.” “My biggest hurdle is myself,” she told me in a Zoom interview. “As much as I know that I put in a lot of work in school and my personal life and professional life of trying to get to the next place, it’s still very discouraging. It’s hard to think that I can compete with other people out there being fresh out of college.” Like all participants, Harden received training, opportunities to network with other participants and a “success coach” who met regularly with her as a kind of mentor. “My success coach is the bomb dot com,” she told me. Harden said her coach has at times felt like a therapist. “She’s helped me to know that I can do it. There are people who believe in me.”

Students, read the entire essay and then tell us:

Does Maryland’s Service Year Option appeal to you? If your state had a similar program for recent high school graduates, or if you live in Maryland, would you consider participating? What aspects of the program do you find most enticing?

Does a career in public service — working for a nonprofit or the government, in a field like public health or community development, or at some other mission-driven organization — interest you? Why or why not?

Is there a cause that you strongly support? If so, how, if at all, are you involved with it? Do you donate money to the cause, volunteer your time, spread its message or work for it part time? Do you see yourself being in a career dedicated to that cause in the future?

Romona Harden, 22, describes how important her “success coach” has been in helping her work toward her career goals. Do you think such a coach would be helpful to you? Do you have someone in your life you consider a mentor, a guide or a role model? How have they aided you?

Gov. Wes Moore of Maryland said: “This is the kind of program that gives people such hope and inspiration. I really do believe in the idea that service will save us.” What do you think he means by that? Do you agree?

Should all states provide residents with opportunities to work in public service — and have taxpayers fund it — as Maryland is doing? Why or why not?

Students 13 and older in the United States and Britain, and 16 and older elsewhere, are invited to comment. All comments are moderated by the Learning Network staff, but please keep in mind that once your comment is accepted, it will be made public and may appear in print.

Find more Student Opinion questions here. Teachers, check out this guide to learn how you can incorporate these prompts into your classroom.

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Joe sheridan heads to adrian college for football, track and field, medical studies.

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News Photo by Owen Kinzey Joe Sheridan, center, signs to continue athletic and academic careers at Adrian College. Sheridan plans to be a dual-sport athlete, participating in both football and track and field.

ALPENA — If there’s one student at Alpena High School who defines sports, values, and hard work, it’s Joe Sheridan.

Most collegiate athletes have a sharp focus on athletics after high school, setting themselves up with a major that allows them to dedicate time to the sport they love.

Meanwhile, Sheridan plans to focus on not one but two sports, along with pursuing his dreams of becoming a pre-medical student at Adrian College.

With an eventual goal of becoming a surgeon, Sheridan’s time as a Bulldog will be essential in determining the next steps in his life.

Although the choice to join Adrian wasn’t easy for Sheridan, the opportunity to indulge in hurdles for track and field while simultaneously playing tight end for the football team seemed impossible to pass up.

after school work jobs

News Photo by Owen Kinzey Joe Sheridan poses with friends and family during his signing on Wednesday to continue his athletic and academic careers after high school graduation at Adrian College. The Wildcat will be a part of the football and track and field teams while also planning to be in the pre-medical program.

“I went into the recruiting process looking for smaller schools, and I ended up finding Adrian,” Sheridan said. “They initially recruited me for track, but I also decided to join the football team. My visits to the campus made a great impression, and I just really liked everything about it.”

Finding a home as a Bulldog and taking a massive step up in athletics and academics will be substantial changes, but Sheridan is ready for the challenges.

Track and field times will translate quite easily because you’re running against a clock, but after a season-ending football injury, Sheridan will have to bounce back against even tougher competition.

This could feel daunting to any athlete, but Sheridan is confident that he’ll be able to work into speed and compete with anybody at any level.

“As for track, Adrian has an elite team of hurdle recruits that I’m super excited to join,” he said. “We have the potential to be a top-five nationally-ranked hurdle group. For football, they’re lacking a tight end, so I hope to add my skills to both of those teams.”

after school work jobs

Between both sports, Sheridan has his work cut out for him, but the pre-med path will be an even more formidable challenge.

Managing this could seem impossible, but Sheridan finished in the top ten percent of his graduating class and even a top ten student in grade point average overall at Alpena High School.

He understands classes will be more difficult, but his mindset, similar to that of sports and past schooling, means he’s ready for anything.

Before traveling and moving downstate, reminiscing and remembering everything accomplished at AHS is also important.

Of every athletic event and moment he’s participated in, he said the countless nights spent with the football team at Applebee’s tend to stand out the most.

after school work jobs

The tightly-knit relationships with teammates are unforgettable and truly mean the world to Sheridan and his fellow graduates.

Before signing off and officially becoming a Bulldog, Sheridan expressed his gratitude to everyone who gave him this chance.

“I would like to appreciate my family for supporting me, coming to my games, and taking me to all my different events and Coach Kraft for track, who has worked with me very personally to become better at hurdles and helped to shape me into the man I am today,” Sheridan said.

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Art in the Loft’s ‘SummerView 2024’ opens Wednesday

Alpena county courts committee to meet.

The Alpena County Courts and Public Safety Committee will meet today at 4 p.m. in the Howard Male Conference Room ...

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PHOTO: 2nd annual Mental Health Movement

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On Tuesday, the Alpena High School baseball team competed at Gaylord, losing 5-3 and 5-4. In game one, Kaleb ...

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Sanctuary Cinema in Alpena exceeds expectations in first year of operation

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Starting at $2.99/week.

Chicago sees spike in Black teens out of school and work, study shows

Experts say the pandemic disrupted the pathways that helped teens get a job or an education after high school. young adults are “discouraged” about not getting hired, a youth mentor says..

Three African American teenagers work at a Chicago Park District location

Young people often get their start working through a job with the city of Chicago or the Park District, including these junior labor seasonal workers in Humboldt Park in 2014.

Michael Schmidt/Sun-Times file

Chicago’s youth unemployment rate is higher than the rest of Illinois and the nation at large, according to a new study , demonstrating a sign of the uneven recovery since the COVID-19 pandemic .

Though the U.S. unemployment rate has largely recovered since the pandemic, many teens and young adults — particularly people of color — still struggle to find consistent work.

Researchers from the University of Illinois Chicago’s Great Cities Institute looked at employment and school-going rates for youth between the ages of 16 and 24 in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois and the U.S between 2019 and 2022, the most recent data available.

“It seems that many teens are not successfully transitioning from high school to going out and getting a job, going to college, entering a trade or receiving any sort of education,” said Matthew Wilson, study author and an associate director at the Great Cities Institute. “Those pathways were disrupted by the pandemic.”

The researchers found that teens and young adults of color struggled the most to land a job. Even more concerning was the number of youth both out of work and school.

Black 16- to 19–year-olds saw their rates of employment and school-going decline between 2021 and 2022, widening a gap that existed before the pandemic. Some 17.5% of Black teens were out of school and not working in 2022, up from 9.4% in 2021.

  • Mayor-elect Johnson’s plans to double number of summer jobs for Chicago’s teens might require some work

“The fact that so many Black teens are jobless is just inexcusable,” said Jack Wuest, the executive director of the Alternative Schools Network, which commissioned the report.

The highest percentages of joblessness among teens in Chicago — nearly 93% — were concentrated around the South and Southwest side neighborhoods of Pilsen, Bridgeport, McKinley Park, Fuller Park and Back of the Yards.

Overall, the researchers found more than 45,000 young people and teens were both out of school and jobless.

But there’s also some good news: The number of Black 20- to 24-year-olds in Chicago who are out of school and jobless fell from roughly 39% in 2021 to almost 30% in 2022.

Wilson said this was because “adults tend to recover from recessions much quicker in terms of their ability to obtain work.”

Out-of-school and jobless rates for 20- to 24-year-olds also vary across Chicago. The lowest number of out-of-school and jobless young adults was recorded in a section of the North Side, at 1.7%, while the highest rate was recorded on the West Side, 48.3%.

Evette Johnson, a youth mentor at Pedro Albizu Campos High School on the West Side, said a lot of the teens she works with “are discouraged when it comes to trying to apply for a job because they aren’t getting hired.”

But job programs like the one she helps run at her school are helping teens who struggled during the pandemic get back on track by teaching them everything from how to draft cover letters to prepping for job interviews.

  • Illinois could lower unemployment with more apprenticeship programs

Wuest of the Alternative Schools Network said more jobs for teens and young adults would result in less crime across Chicago. He points to One Summer Chicago Plus, a job program highlighted in the study, which research showed decreased arrests for violent crimes among participants by 45%.

Wuest praised Mayor Brandon Johnson for his commitment to expanding job opportunities for young people citywide. But Johnson’s expanded summer youth employment program has been slow to take off . He had hoped to double its size last summer but ended up only adding about 2,000 new job openings for people between the ages of 14 and 24.

Johnson aims to add another 4,000 new job openings for young people this summer. The city says that will bring the program size to about 29,000 jobs .

Wuest wants Springfield legislators to help by approving $300 million in funding to expand job opportunities for teens and young adults across Illinois. Lawmakers are expected to finalize their budget by the end of this month.

Anna Savchenko is a reporter for WBEZ.

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NEW: Other driver charged with DUI-manslaughter in crash that killed eight farmworkers

after school work jobs

A bus carrying farmworkers to a job site crashed and overturned Tuesday morning off State Road 40 West in west Marion County. Eight people died and eight more were critically injured, according to the Florida Highway Patrol and Marion County Fire Rescue. SR 40 West was closed between U.S. 41 and County Road 328 as first responders and investigators continued their work at the scene. The workers were heading to Cannon Farms in Dunnellon when the crash happened, officials said.

GoFundMe account set up

The Farmworker Association of Florida has set up a GoFundMe account to help the victims and their families.

— Austin L. Miller

Arrested driver has a traffic record

According to records on file with the Marion County court clerk, Bryan Maclean Howard was cited for numerous traffic-related offenses from 2004 to 2019, including failure to wear seatbelt, driving on a suspended or expired driver's license, failure to stop at a red light, careless driving and leaving the scene of an accident with property damage.

In the latter case, according to court records, Howard was driving in northeast Ocala and struck a utility pole, splitting it in half. He later told an Ocala police officer he left the scene because he did not have auto insurance, according to an arrest affidavit.

Howard also has been convicted of possessing drug paraphernalia and grand theft.

— Austin L. Miller and Jim Ross

Update: Other driver in the crash has been arrested

In a news bulletin emailed just before 5 p.m. Tuesday, FHP announced that the other driver involved in the crash has been arrested and held on eight counts of DUI-manslaughter.

The driver was identified as Bryan Maclean Howard, 40, of Ocala. He was driving a 2001 Ford Ranger pickup. Additional details about the arrest were not provided. He was arrested at a local hospital, where he had been taken for treatment.

In the statement, the FHP said only that it will "conduct both a thorough and exhaustive traffic crash and criminal investigation."

Advocacy group: Deaths were 'very tragic and needless'

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), which describes itself as the nation's largest and oldest Hispanic civil rights volunteer-based organization, issued a statement on Tuesday expressing "profound sorrow" and calling the deaths "very tragic and needless."

"They are the ones who put the food on our tables and nourish the state and our country," said Asia Clermont, Florida LULAC state director, in the statement. "It is too easy to dismiss this as just another accident. Florida must take every possible step to protect its essential workers, who are human beings and the backbone of the state's economy. We ask all Americans to join us in prayer and support for the recovery of the injured and help for the loved ones of those we've lost."

The group said that the bus passengers "were farmworkers en route to a farm in the area, underscoring the critical role these individuals play in sustaining the agricultural sector and feeding our communities."

It further noted that "officials have confirmed that the workers had the necessary documentation to be employed in Florida."

"Our hearts go out to the families of those who have been killed," Clermont says in the statement. "I know what it feels like to experience such a loss, especially when far away from home. As immigrants, we can feel even more vulnerable in times of crisis.

"Florida LULAC wants the affected families to know that we're standing behind our fellow workers and are here to support them in any way we can. They definitely need our assistance, whatever that might be. Also, we will be more than happy to cooperate with the various agencies working on finding out what happened and providing aid to the victims," she adds.

The group said that the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is "actively monitoring the situation."

Updates on the patients at local hospitals

As of 3:20 p.m. Tuesday, AdventHealth Ocala had transferred two of its 16 crash patients to other facilities. "The remaining 14 patients in our care are in the process of being discharged from the hospital," a spokesperson said.

HCA Florida Ocala Hospital listed seven crash victims in critical condition and two in stable condition. Its sister facility, HCA Florida West Marion Hospital, had one patient in stable condition.

Praise for the cooperation on scene

Marion County Fire Rescue Chief James Banta praised the interagency cooperation. He said 35 units from his agency alone responded, working the scene with FHP and other agencies.

“I also want to thank our partners at the Marion County Sheriff's Office, Emergency Management, HCA Ocala, AdventHealth Ocala, and the Marion County Public School system for their invaluable assistance in transporting 45 patients to local hospitals. Their coordinated efforts were crucial in managing this crisis,” Banta said in a Marion County Fire Rescue Facebook post.

'We're heartbroken'

Julie Taylor, executive director of the National Farm Worker Ministry , was contacted by the Star Banner.

"We're heartbroken," she said.

The organization was formed in 1971 and fights for better working and living conditions for farmworkers.

She said when farmworkers are killed or injured in these kinds of situations, her organization worries about several things. For example, many farmworkers don't have health insurance. Also, her agency worries about the families: When the injured people don't work, the families often are left without income. How will the families cope?

Concerned about the first responders

The Professional Firefighters of Marion County and the International Association of Fire Fighters have reached out to the crew members who responded to the scene, offering assistance during this difficult time.

A comment from Cannon Farms in Dunnellon

On its Facebook page, Cannon Farms announced that it will be closed Tuesday out of respect for the crash victims.

The post said the company involved was Olvera Trucking Harvesting Corp.

Other fatal crashes in Marion County

Eight is the highest number of fatalities in one Marion County vehicle crash in recent memory. Here's a look at some other recent crashes with multiple fatalities.

'My heart goes out to them'

Speaking late Tuesday morning during a press conference at the crash scene, Sheriff Billy Woods said: "My heart goes out to them," in reference to the victims and their families.

Woods said his agency is assisting investigators, especially with Spanish language translation. Officials are trying to notify the victims' families.

The sheriff said the people on the bus are hard working individuals and the crash was a tragedy.

Pickup truck driver is in serious condition

The driver of the other vehicle involved in Tuesday morning's crash is hospitalized in serious condition, FHP reported late Tuesday morning.

FHP: The number of fatalities could increase

Speaking late Tuesday morning during a press conference at the crash scene, an FHP official said it's possible the number of deaths could increase, given the conditions of the critically injured bus occupants.

More details about the crash

According to the Florida Highway Patrol, the crash happened about 6:35 a.m. Tuesday and the location was SR 40 approximately 500 feet west of Southwest 148th Court.

FHP also reports that the bus is a 2010 International bus and the other vehicle involved is a 2001 Ford Ranger.

Laborers were heading to a watermelon farm in west Marion County

Officials on scene said the farmworkers worked for a private company and were being taken to a watermelon farm. There is no name on the side of the bus, and the owner of the private company was aboard the vehicle and had to be transported to a hospital after the crash. No additional details were available as of 9:05 a.m.

There were 53 people aboard the bus, officials said. Eight died, eight more were critically injured and the rest had minor or no injuries, but still were taken to local hospitals for evaluation.

Updated information on State Road 40 West closure

The Florida Department of Transportation has announced that State Road 40 West is temporarily closed between U.S. 41 and County Road 328.

Tuesday morning crash did not involve Marion County Public Schools bus

The bus involved in the crash was not affiliated with the school district. The vehicle is owned by a private company and was transporting farmworkers. The school district did provide a school bus to help transport victims.

— Star Banner staff

Special FHP team will investigate bus crash

The FHP's SIRT Team will investigate this crash. SIRT is short for Specialized Investigations Reconstruction Team.

Update: FHP confirms 8 people have died in the bus crash

The Florida Highway Patrol has confirmed that eight people were killed in the crash and eight more were critically injured. The injured were taken to HCA Florida Ocala Hospital. Ten people were seriously injured. At least 25 occupants suffered minor injuries.

Here's how the bus crash happened

According to the Florida Highway Patrol, the bus was heading west on SR 40 and a brown Ford Ranger was eastbound on the same road. A witness told troopers that for some reason the Ranger moved into the westbound lane and the vehicles sideswiped.

The bus ran onto the south shoulder, struck a board fence and two trees, then overturned, troopers said.

Marion County Sheriff's Office announces temporary road closure because of crash

The Marion County Sheriff's Office has announced that State Road 40 West is temporarily closed between Southwest 180th Avenue Road and Southwest 140th Avenue as crews respond to the bus crash.

This is a developing story

54 Houston ISD schools closed today due to storm damage and power outages

Brandon Hamilton Image

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- Work is underway to get more Houston ISD schools reopened following last week's destructive storm.

On Monday, some students will return to class, while 54 campuses will remain closed due to damage and power outages.

SEE FULL LIST OF HISD SCHOOLS OPEN ON MONDAY

HISD released a list of schools that will be open on Monday. If your student's school is on the list, the campus has power, with a fully functional cooling system and ready-to-serve food service.

Scarborough High School is among the campuses that are still in the dark.

ABC13 was at the school on Monday, where crews were seen working to restore the power. We asked the district if generators were being installed but could not get an answer.

Nearby, damage was also spotted at Sinclair Elementary School in the Lazybrook-Timbergrove area.

PREVIOUS REPORT: HISD releases list of select campuses that will open on Monday after closures due to deadly storm

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HISD said Sinclair is one of four campuses with significant damage - Pugh, Robinson, and Paige elementary schools are the others.

Superintendent Mike Miles said schools without power is the biggest issue.

"The goal is to try and get every school ready by Monday, if the power comes on, so kids can go to school. It will be their choice. If the power is out at their house, hopefully, they will be in a position to come to school where there is power," Miles said.

Miles says depending on the situation, they may bus students from schools with no power to schools that do have power.

SEE OTHER DISTRICTS: Southeast Texas schools announce reopening plans following destructive storm

HISD and the Houston Food Bank will be helping families in need with a food and supply distribution on Monday and Tuesday.

Monday, May 20

  • Brock Sunrise Center -- 1417 Houston Ave.
  • Morefield Sunrise Center -- 5950 Selinsky Rd.
  • Starts at 10 a.m.

Tuesday, May 21

  • YDC Sunrise Center - 6050 Bretshire Dr.
  • Starts at 9 a.m.

For news updates, follow Brandon Hamilton on Facebook , Twitter and Instagram .

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NEWS... BUT NOT AS YOU KNOW IT

How ‘predator’ teacher Rebecca Joynes groomed two schoolboys for sex

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How 'predator' teacher Rebecca Joynes groomed two schoolboys for sex

One boy, aged 15, lied to his parents that he was going around to a friend’s house to play Fifa .

The other, 16, told his he was going to watch a Manchester United match.

In fact, both were secretly going to meet their maths teacher, Rebecca Joynes, at her riverside apartment in Salford Quays.

The 30-year-old now faces jail for grooming the boys, one of whom is the father of her baby.

So how did the ‘shy and quiet’ girl who later secured her ‘dream job’ as a teacher transform into a ‘sexual predator’ targeting her own pupils?

Joynes was born in December 1993 and grew up in a £500,000 semi-detached home in the Merseyside town of Birkenhead.

Her parents, café owners Stuart, 54, and Mel, 55, supported her throughout the trial, with the former often pictured with his arm around his daughter as she walked to court.

Maths Teacher Rebecca Joynes and her dad leave Manchester Crown Court after she was convicted and warned she faces jail (Picture: Bruce Adams/Daily Mail)

A childhood friend of Joynes’s recalled her as ‘a very talented gymnast’.

Speaking to The Times, they said: ‘When she was older she had a long-term relationship and we all thought they would end up getting married. It was surprising when they broke up. I would never have thought she would be capable of something like this.’

Following her postgraduate studies Joynes became a maths teacher in 2018.

Petite, softly spoken and described by teenage pupils as ‘really pretty’, she soon gained the nickname ‘Bunda Becky’.

By the time of the offences, she was 28, had undergone a messy break-up after the end of a nine-year relationship, struggled during the Covid pandemic, and was lonely when she became ‘flattered’ by the attention.

Joynes said Boy A got her mobile number after she gave him all but one of the digits, and as a problem-solving exercise, he had to work out the final digit.

They connected on Snapchat and he sent her flirty texts with the pair agreeing to meet in secret.

Boy A told his mother his schoolteacher was ‘well fit’ and all the boys fancied her, which she dismissed as a ‘typical teenage’ boy’s comment.

Two weeks later the youngster lied to her that he was staying over at a friend’s house to play Fifa after school finished on Friday.

Instead Joynes picked him up near his home in her Audi A1, took him to the Trafford Centre and bought him a £350 Gucci belt.

Teacher Rebecca Joynes ,with father(R), leaves Manchester Crown court, charged with two counts of sexual activity with two different children and having a baby from one of them. - Pic Bruce Adams / Copy Tozer - 14/5/24

On the way Joynes laughed and said, ‘Oh shut up!’ when Boy A, referring to driving, said, ‘I’m not old enough’.

Back at her flat they kissed then had sex twice, Joynes telling the boy, ‘No one had better find out’.

The next day the boy’s mother noticed a love-bite on her son’s neck which he dismissed as, ‘nothing’.

However, Boy A had taken a photo on his Snapchat and rumours began to circulate as police received a tip-off.

Come Monday morning, officers were at the school along with Boy A’s ‘distraught’ mother who stormed into reception after being told her son had spent the night with a teacher.

Boy A initially told police it was just ‘banter’ between the boys that got out of hand, as Joynes was suspended and a police investigation began.

His semen was later recovered from bed sheets seized at the teacher’s flat.

She was bailed on condition she have no unsupervised contact with anyone under 18.

Joynes said she then had a ‘breakdown’ and moved back to her parents on the Wirral.

She was at a low point when Boy B messaged her on Snapchat asking how she was. ‘I genuinely thought he cared,’ Joynes said.

Teacher Rebecca Joynes ,with father (R), arrives at Manchester Crown court, charged with two counts of sexual activity with two different juveniles. - Pic Bruce Adams / Copy Tozer - 15/5/24

Soon Boy B was also messaging, ‘Get your tits out’, Joynes replying, ‘Not tonight’.

She moved back to Salford Quays and Boy B visited, with Joynes straddling him and they kissed, but she suggested waiting until he was 16 before going any further.

After his birthday Boy B lied to his parents telling them he was off to watch a Manchester United match but instead again went to Joynes’ apartment.

He told jurors how he was ‘nervous’ when he lost his virginity to Joynes, warning her, ‘Don’t expect anything big, I’m only 16’.

As he stripped Joynes said, ‘Oh! You lied to me’.

He later told police he regarded the relationship as ‘friends with benefits’ and said they regularly had sex while he was still at school.

He said Joynes had told him she could not have a baby and they had unprotected sex, but in fact she discovered she was pregnant.

The relationship also soured, with frequent rows, as Joynes became jealous and controlling, he claimed.

In a bid to save the relationship and just a day before Joynes was arrested for a second time, she invited Boy B round for a ‘date night’ involving an Ann Summers scratchcard of sexual activities, rose petals and hidden notes around her flat, leading to ‘surprises’ which he played along with and followed.

At the end it was a baby grow, saying, ‘Best Dad’ on the front.

‘I was like, ‘What the f***!’’ Boy B told police.

Teacher Rebecca Joynes (pictured) at Manchester Crown court, charged with two counts of sexual activity with a child. - Pic Bruce Adams / Copy Tozer - 7/5/24

In a letter to Boy B, Joynes wrote: ‘Every inch of you is perfect. You are all I ever dream about.’

She was arrested the next day for breaking her bail conditions and spent five months in custody until she was bailed in November last year, giving birth in early 2024.

Joynes wore a pink baby’s bonnet tucked into her trousers while coming into court, wiping tears away as she told how the baby was taken away from her 24 hours after giving birth.

The bonnet was a ‘naked attempt to garner sympathy’, prosecutor Joe Allman said.

Joynes denied any sexual activity with Boy A ever took place and said that when he stayed over at her flat he slept on the sofa.

And she said sexual activity with Boy B only began after he had left school and she had been dismissed from her job, so no offence had been committed as she was no longer in a position of authority.

She said she felt lonely, let her guard down and ‘caved in’ to the attention she was getting, making ‘stupid mistakes’ by meeting youngsters out of school, but denied wrongdoing.

Mr Allman suggested she saw her position differently because she was a woman, and no-one would have any sympathy for a 30-year-old male teacher taking teenage girls to his flat.

Jane Wilson, senior crown prosecutor for CPS North West, said: ‘Rebecca Joynes is a sexual predator.

‘Joynes was entrusted with the responsibility of teaching and safeguarding children. She abused her position to groom and ultimately sexually exploit schoolboys. Her behaviour has had a lasting impact on them.

‘The CPS worked with Greater Manchester Police to build a strong case to put before the jury, including eyewitness testimony, phone evidence showing the messages sent by Joynes and CCTV footage.

‘I would like to thank the victims for supporting the prosecution. Joynes will now face the consequences of her actions.’

Get in touch with our news team by emailing us at [email protected] .

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MORE : Gang jailed after turning nursing home into £450,000 cannabis farm

MORE : Teacher Rebecca Joynes found guilty of having sex with two pupils

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Who Is Harrison Butker's Wife? All About Isabelle Butker

Kansas City Chiefs kicker Harrison Butker and his wife, Isabelle Butker, got married in 2018

Harrison Butker has been married to his wife, Isabelle Butker, since 2018.

The Kansas City Chiefs kicker became engaged to Isabelle in 2017 after she converted to Catholicism, and the pair have since centered their faith in their marriage.

In May 2024, Harrison spoke more about his gratitude for his wife in his controversial commencement speech for Benedictine College, describing how her “life truly started” when she became his wife and a mother to their two children: a son, James, and a daughter whose name has not been shared.

“I can tell you that my beautiful wife Isabelle would be the first to say her life truly started when she started living her vocation as a wife and as a mother,” he said. “I’m on this stage today, able to be the man that I am, because I have a wife who leans into her vocation.”

So who is Harrison Butker’s wife? Here’s everything to know about Isabelle Butker and her relationship with the athlete.

She was an athlete in college

Isabelle, who grew up in Georgia, attended Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. She played for the school’s basketball team all four years, graduating in 2016.

Throughout her college career, she played in 26 games and averaged seven minutes per game, per her profile .

She met Harrison in high school

Isabelle and Butker began dating during their freshman year of high school and attended prom together in April 2013.

They continued dating throughout college despite the distance between them, as Isabelle went to school in Memphis while Harrison was at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta.

“We met in high school,” Harrison said during a January 2023 appearance on the Kansas City Mom Collective podcast. “A lot changes with Division I football, playing in the NFL, but she’s been by my side through everything.”

She converted to Catholicism after they started dating

In 2022, Isabelle joined The Unraveled Podcast and spoke about her experience converting to Catholicism after she began dating Harrison. She said she didn’t grow up very religious and was always more “independent,” but in her senior year of college, as Harrison grew more devout in his faith, she began to explore it more herself.

“He stopped trying to force anything on me, he was just praying for me,” Isabelle said.

After a spiritual experience during Mass, Isabelle said that she felt Catholicism was where she belonged and after she told Harrison, the two of them both broke down crying as he admitted he’d been praying every day for her to convert.

The following Easter, she entered the church, and a month later, she and Harrison were engaged.

They got married in 2018

Harrison proposed to Isabelle in May 2017, just a month after he was drafted into the NFL.

“After almost 7 years of being best friends with this girl, I finally popped the question,” he wrote in a since-deleted post on Instagram. “From the first moments of our relationship, back in freshman year of high school, I always envisioned marrying you and raising a family together.”

He added, “You push me to be a better man and are so patient and forgiving when I fall short. I am truly amazed at how God has worked in your life and in our relationship and pray we continue to learn and grow from each other. Can’t wait to see what our future holds together as a married couple! I love you Izzy.”

The two got married on April 5, 2018, in a Catholic church.

“I will continue to pray for the strength and perseverance to sacrifice for you everyday of our marriage,” he wrote on X (formerly Twitter) after their nuptials. “I love you Izzy!”

They share two children

Isabelle and Harrison welcomed their first child together, James Augustine Butker, in January 2019. They welcomed another child, a daughter, in the years after, though the kicker didn’t make a formal announcement of her birth.

Both kids supported their dad after the Chiefs won the Super Bowl in 2023 when they joined him on the field after his game-winning kick. James and his sister were dressed in Butker jerseys, with James matching his top with red shorts and the little girl donning a red tutu.

He referenced Isabelle in his controversial commencement speech

During his graduation speech for the Benedictine College class of 2024, Harrison made a series of controversial comments, sharing his thoughts on abortion, President Biden and COVID-19, among other topics. He also mentioned Isabelle when discussing what he believes to be the "most important title" a woman can hold, that of a "homemaker."

Addressing the women in the room directly, Harrison said they “have had the most diabolical lies told to you,” by people encouraging them to hold jobs and start careers instead of staying home. He said he “would venture to guess that the majority of you are most excited about your marriage and the children you will bring into this world.”

He went on to add that he was “beyond blessed” with his marriage and that Isabelle was most fulfilled by her role as a “homemaker.”

“It cannot be overstated that all my success is made possible because a girl I met in band class back in middle school would convert to the faith, become my wife and embrace one of the most important titles of all: homemaker,” Harrison said.

He continued, "Isabelle's dream of having a career might not have come true, but if you ask her today if she has any regrets on her decision, she would laugh out loud without hesitation, and say, 'Hey, no.' "

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Read the original article on People .

Jamie Squire/Getty Harrison Butker, Isabelle Butker, and their baby after the Chiefs defeated the Tennessee Titans in the AFC Championship Game on January 19, 2020 in Kansas City, Missouri.

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