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General Officer Assignments

The Chief of Staff of the Army announces the following officer assignments:

Gen. James J. Mingus to vice chief of staff of the Army, Washington, D.C. He most recently served as director, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Lt. Gen. Michele H. Bredenkamp to director's advisor for Military Affairs, Office of the Director of National Intelligence, Washington, D.C. She most recently served as commanding general, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

Lt. Gen. Robert M. Collins to military deputy/director, Army Acquisition Corps, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology), Washington, D.C. He most recently served as deputy for Acquisition and Systems Management, Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army (Acquisition, Logistics and Technology), Washington, D.C.

Lt. Gen. Sean A. Gainey to commanding general, U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command/U.S. Army Forces Strategic Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. He most recently served as director, Counter-Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office; and director of Fires, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Lt. Gen. Karl H. Gingrich to deputy chief of staff, G-8, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C. He most recently served as director, Program Analysis and Evaluation, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-8, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Lt. Gen. Anthony R. Hale to deputy chief of staff, G-2, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C. He most recently served as commanding general/commandant, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca, Fort Huachuca, Arizona.

Lt. Gen. William J. Hartman to deputy commander, U.S. Cyber Command, Fort Meade, Maryland. He most recently served as commander, Cyber National Mission Force, U.S. Cyber Command, Fort Meade, Maryland.

Lt. Gen. David M. Hodne to deputy commanding general, Futures and Concepts, U.S. Army Futures Command, Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia. He most recently served as director, Chief of Staff of the Army Transition Team, Office of the Chief of Staff of the Army, Washington, D.C.

Lt. Gen. Heidi J. Hoyle to deputy chief of staff, G-4, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C. She most recently served as director of Operations, G-43/5/7, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4, U.S. Army, Washington, DC.

Lt. Gen. David T. Isaacson to director, J-6, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C. He most recently served as director, J-1, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Lt. Gen. Mary K. Izaquirre to The Surgeon General, U.S. Army; and commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Command, Washington, D.C. She most recently served as commanding general, Medical Readiness Command, East; and chief of the U.S. Army Medical Corps, Fort Belvoir, Virginia.

Lt. Gen. Thomas L. James to deputy commander, U.S. Space Command, Peterson Space Force Base, Colorado. He most recently served as deputy commander, Combined Joint Task Force Space Operations, U.S. Space Command, Peterson Space Force Base, Colorado.

Lt. Gen. Laura A. Potter to director of the Army Staff, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C. She most recently served as deputy chief of staff, G-2, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Lt. Gen. Andrew M. Rohling to deputy chairman, NATO Military Committee, Belgium. He most recently served as deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany.

Lt. Gen. Mark T. Simerly to director, Defense Logistics Agency, Fort Belvoir, Virginia. He most recently served as commanding general, U.S. Army Combined Arms Support Command/Sustainment Center of Excellence and Fort Gregg-Adams, Fort Gregg-Adams, Virginia.

Lt. Gen. Douglas A. Sims II to director, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C. He most recently served as director for Operations, J-3, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. (Promotable) John W. Brennan Jr. to deputy commander, U.S. Africa Command, Germany. He most recently served as director of operations, J-3, U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

Maj. Gen. (Promotable) Charles D. Costanza to commanding general, V Corps, Fort Knox, Kentucky. He most recently served as commanding general, 3rd Infantry Division and Fort Stewart, Fort Stewart, Georgia.

Maj. Gen. (Promotable) Stephen G. Smith to deputy commanding general/chief of staff, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina. He most recently served as commanding general, 7th Infantry Division, Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington.

Maj. Gen. Andrew C. Gainey, commanding general, 56th Artillery Command, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany, to commanding general, Southern European Task Force-Africa; and deputy commanding general for Africa, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Italy.

Maj. Gen. Gavin J. Gardner, director for Logistics, Engineering and Security Cooperation, J-4, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, Camp H. M. Smith, Hawaii, to commanding general, 8th Theater Sustainment Command, Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

Maj. Gen. Patrick L. Gaydon, vice director for Joint Force Development, J-7, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

Chaplain (Maj. Gen.) William Green Jr. to chief of chaplains, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C. He most recently served as deputy chief of chaplains, Office of the Chief of Chaplains, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. Garrick M. Harmon, deputy commanding general, Security Assistance Group-Ukraine, Operation Atlantic Resolve, Germany, to director of Strategy, Plans, and Programs, U.S. Africa Command, Germany.

Maj. Gen. Joseph E. Hilbert, director, Force Development, G-8, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, 11th Airborne Division; and deputy commander, U.S. Alaskan Command, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska.

Maj. Gen. James P. Isenhower III, commanding general, 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss, Fort Bliss, Texas, to assistant deputy chief of staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. Ryan M. Janovic, director of Operations, J-3, U.S. Cyber Command, Fort Meade, Maryland, to commanding general, Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Eisenhower, Fort Eisenhower, Georgia.

Maj. Gen. Paula C. Lodi, commanding general, 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support); and command surgeon, U.S. Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, Hawaii, to commanding general, U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command and Fort Detrick, Fort Detrick, Maryland.

Maj. Gen. Charles T. Lombardo, director of Training, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, 2nd Infantry Division (Combined), Eighth Army, Republic of Korea.

Maj. Gen. Douglas S. Lowrey, commanding general, Mission and Installation Contracting Command, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas, to commanding general, Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Maj. Gen. Jacqueline D. McPhail, director of Architecture, Operations, Networks and Space, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-6, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command, Fort Huachuca, Arizona.

Maj. Gen. Scott M. Naumann, deputy chief of staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to commanding general, 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry) and Fort Drum, Fort Drum, New York.

Maj. Gen. Thomas W. O'Connor Jr., commanding general, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, to director, Force Development, G-8, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. John L. Rafferty Jr., chief of Public Affairs, Office of the Secretary of the Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, 56th Artillery Command, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany.

Maj. Gen. Hope C. Rampy, director, Military Personnel Management, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Maj. Gen. Jeth B. Rey, director, Network Cross Functional Team, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to director of Architecture, Operations, Networks and Space, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-6, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Maj. Gen. Lori L. Robinson, commandant of Cadets, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, to commanding general, U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Maj. Gen. James M. Smith, director of Operations, G-43/5/7, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to deputy commanding general, Installation Management Command, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas.

Maj. Gen. Curtis D. Taylor, commanding general, National Training Center and Fort Irwin, Fort Irwin, California, to commanding general, 1st Armored Division and Fort Bliss, Fort Bliss, Texas.

Maj. Gen. Colin P. Tuley, deputy commanding general, XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to commanding general, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence and Fort Moore, Fort Moore, Georgia.

Brig. Gen. (Promotable) David W. Gardner, commanding general, Joint Readiness Training Center and Fort Johnson, Fort Johnson, Louisiana, to deputy chief of staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina.

Brig. Gen. (Promotable) Monte L. Rone, commandant, U.S. Army Infantry School, U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence; and director, Future Soldier Lethality Cross Functional Team, Army Futures Command, Fort Moore, Georgia to Commanding General, 1st Infantry Division and Fort Riley, Fort Riley, Kansas.

Brig. Gen. Brandon C. Anderson, deputy commanding general (Support), 2nd Infantry Division (Combined), Eighth Army, Republic of Korea, to commanding general, National Training Center and Fort Irwin, Fort Irwin, California.

Brig. Gen. Amanda L. Azubuike, deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Cadet Command, Fort Knox, New York, to chief of Public Affairs, Office of the Secretary of the Army, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Maurice O. Barnett, commanding general, 10th Army Air and Missile Defense Command, Germany, to commanding general, U.S. Army Cadet Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Brig. Gen. Christine A. Beeler, commanding general, Army Contracting Command, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama, to program executive officer, Simulations, Training and Instrumentation, Orlando, Florida.

Brig. Gen. Beth A. Behn, chief of Transportation and commandant, U.S. Army Transportation School, U.S. Army Sustainment Center of Excellence, Fort Gregg-Adams, Virginia, to director of Operations, G-43/5/7, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-4, U.S. Army, Washington, DC.

Brig. Gen. Matthew W. Braman, deputy commanding general (Support), 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, New York, to director, Army Aviation, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Matthew W. Brown, deputy commanding general, 3rd (United Kingdom) Division, United Kingdom, to deputy commanding general, V Corps, Germany.

Brig. Gen. John P. Cogbill, deputy director, Operations Fires and Effects, J-3, U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida to Deputy Commanding General, XVIII Airborne Corps, Fort Liberty, North Carolina.

Brig. Gen. Eugene D. Cox, commanding general, Medical Readiness Command, West; and director, Defense Health Network West, Defense Health Agency, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas, to commanding general, 18th Medical Command (Deployment Support); and command surgeon, U.S. Army Pacific, Fort Shafter, Hawaii.

Brig. Gen. Jason A. Curl, director, CJ3, Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent Resolve, Operation Inherent Resolve, Iraq, to commanding general, Joint Readiness Training Center and Fort Johnson, Fort Johnson, Louisiana.

Brig. Gen. Sean P. Davis, commanding general, 13th Expeditionary Sustainment Command, Fort Cavazos, Texas, and Operation Spartan Shield, Kuwait, to deputy chief of staff, G-4, U.S. Army Forces Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina.

Brig. Gen. Sara E. Dudley, deputy commanding general, U.S. Army Special Warfare Center and School, Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to deputy commanding general for Operations, U.S. Army Recruiting Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Brig. Gen. Patrick J. Ellis, deputy chief of staff, G-3, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany, to director, Network Cross Functional Team, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

Brig. Gen. Joseph E. Escandon, deputy chief of staff for Operations, Plans and Experiments, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army Futures Command, Austin, Texas, to deputy commanding general (Operations), 10th Mountain Division (Light Infantry), Fort Drum, New York.

Brig. Gen. Alric L. Francis, deputy commander (Operations), 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas, to commandant, U.S. Army Field Artillery School, U.S. Army Fires Center of Excellence, Fort Sill, Oklahoma.

Brig. Gen. Kirk E. Gibbs, commanding general, Pacific Ocean Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Shafter, Hawaii, to commanding general, Northwestern Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland, Oregon.

Brig. Gen. George C. Hackler, commanding general, U.S. Army Operational Test Command; deputy commanding general for Operational Testing, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, Fort Cavazos, Texas, to deputy commanding general, Combat Capabilities Development Command; and senior commander, Natick Soldier Systems Center, U.S. Army Futures Command, Natick, Massachusetts.

Brig. Gen. Peter G. Hart, deputy director, Strategy, Plans and Policy, J-5, U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, to deputy director for Joint Strategic Planning, Strategy, Plans, and Policy Directorate, J-5, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Paul D. Howard, commandant, U.S. Army Signal School, Fort Eisenhower, Georgia, to director, J-6, U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

Brig. Gen. Paige M. Jennings, commanding general, U.S. Army Financial Management Command, Indianapolis, Indiana, to director, J-1, Joint Staff, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Gregory S. Johnson, The Adjutant General of the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Human Resources Command; commanding general, U.S. Army Physical Disability Agency; and executive director, Military Postal Service Agency, Fort Knox, Kentucky, to director, Military Personnel Management, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-1, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Curtis W. King, commandant, U.S. Army Air Defense Artillery School, U.S. Army Fires Center of Excellence, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, to commanding general, 10th Army Air and Missile Defense Command, Germany.

Brig. Gen. Niave F. Knell, deputy commanding general (Support),1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kansas, to deputy commanding general, U.S. Army North, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas.

Brig. Gen. Kevin J. Lambert, deputy commanding general, V Corps, Germany, to commanding general, Security Force Assistance Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina.

Brig. Gen. Shannon M. Lucas, deputy provost marshal general, Office of the Provost Marshal General, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C., to commanding general, U.S. Army Operational Test Command; and deputy commanding general for Operational Testing, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, Fort Cavazos, Texas.

Brig. Gen. Mark D. Miles, director of Command, Control, Communications and Cyber, J-6, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, Camp Smith, Hawaii, to deputy commanding general, Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Eisenhower, Fort Eisenhower, Georgia.

Brig. Gen. Constantin E. Nicolet, director of Intelligence, J-2, U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, to director, J-2, U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida.

Brig. Gen. David C. Phillips to program executive officer, Program Executive Office - Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. He most recently served as project manager, Future Long Range Assault Aircraft, Program Executive Office Aviation, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

Brig. Gen. Philip J. Ryan, commander, Special Operations Joint Task Force-Levant, Operation Inherent Resolve, Jordan, to commanding general, U.S. Army South, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas.

Brig. Gen. Andrew O. Saslav, deputy commanding general (Operations), 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to deputy chief of staff, G-3, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany.

Brig. Gen. Jason C. Slider, deputy commanding general (Operations), 3rd Division (France), France, to commanding general, U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, Fort Liberty, North Carolina.

Chaplain (Brig. Gen.) Jack J. Stumme to deputy chief of chaplains, Office of the Chief of Chaplains, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C. He most recently served as command chaplain, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany.

Brig. Gen. James D. Turinetti IV, director, J-6, U.S. Central Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, to commanding general, U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command and Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland.

Brig. Gen. Camilla A. White, deputy program executive officer, Command, Control and Communication (Tactical), Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, to program executive officer, Combat Support/Combat Service Support, Warren, Michigan.

Brig. Gen. Jeremy S. Wilson, deputy commanding general (Maneuver), 3rd Infantry Division, Fort Stewart, Georgia, to deputy commanding general-Training, U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

Brig. Gen. Scott C. Woodward, deputy commanding general-Training, U.S. Army Combined Arms Center, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, to deputy commanding general (Support), 2nd Infantry Division (Combined), Eighth Army, Republic of Korea.

Brig. Gen. Joseph W. Wortham II, deputy commanding general (Operations), 1st Special Forces Command (Airborne), Fort Liberty, North Carolina, to assistant commander-Support, Joint Special Operations Command, U.S. Special Operations Command, Fort Liberty, North Carolina.

Brig. Gen. David J. Zinn, deputy commanding general (Operations), 25th Infantry Division, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii, to director of Training, Office of the Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7, U.S. Army, Washington, D.C.

Col. Andrew L. Landers,* commander, 68th Medical Command (Deployment Support); and command surgeon, U.S. Army Europe-Africa, Germany, to deputy chief of staff for Operations, U.S. Army Medical Command, Falls Church, Virginia.

Col. Yolonda R. Summons,* deputy chief of staff for Operations, U.S. Army Medical Command, Falls Church, Virginia, to commander, Medical Readiness Command, West; and director, Defense Health Network West, Defense Health Agency, Joint Base San Antonio, Texas.

* Officer has been nominated for promotion to brigadier general. Assignment of this colonel should not be construed as the Senate's consent of this promotion nomination. There will be no action to frock or promote these officers until confirmed by the Senate.

Army Reserve

Maj. Gen. Deborah L. Kotulich, director (Inactive Ready Reserve), Army Recruiting and Retention Task Force, Washington, D.C., to deputy chief of Army Reserve (Individual Mobilized Augmentee), Office of the Chief of Army Reserve, Washington, D.C.

Brig. Gen. Kent J. Lightner, deputy commander - Support (Troop Program Unit), 412th Engineer Command, Vicksburg, Mississippi, to deputy commander - Support (Troop Program Unit), 81st Readiness Division, Fort Jackson, South Carolina.

Brig. Gen. Katherine A. Simonson, deputy commander (Troop Program Unit), 3rd Medical Command, Forest Park, Georgia, to deputy commanding general (Inactive Ready Reserve), U.S. Army Recruiting Command, Fort Knox, Kentucky.

Brig. Gen. Richard W. Corner II, commander (Troop Program Unit), 85th U.S. Army Reserve Support Command, Arlington Heights, Illinois, to special assistant to the assistant secretary of the Army (Individual Mobilized Augmentee), Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Washington, D,C.

Brig. Gen. Brian T. Cashman, deputy commanding general (Individual Mobilized Augmentee), Southern European Task Force Africa, Italy, to commander, Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, U.S. Africa Command, Djibouti.

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army aviation assignments

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Trending topics, approximately 30 percent of sailors remain in same area following new billet assignment, cnp says.

army aviation assignments

Three in 10 sailors did not have to move due to their new billet assignments, the head of naval personnel said Wednesday.

As a result of changes to billet assignments, such as the detailing marketplace assignment policy , sailors are able to stay in the same geographic area longer, Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. Richard Cheeseman said Wednesday during a Navy Memorial talk. The detailing marketplace assignment policy is the Navy’s billet-based advancement program that aims to give sailors more control over their promotions and next assignments.

While 30 percent does not come across as particularly high, Cheeseman said it is for the sea service. Retired Rear Adm. Frank Thorp, president of the U.S. Navy Memorial, said he remembered during his service that the rate was less than 1 percent. When people got new assignments, they expected to move.

Consistent geographic location is one way the Navy is working to retain sailors. Cheeseman noted that the service is on track to meet its goals for retention. For some sailors, especially those with families, the chance to stay in the same location can be enough of an incentive to keep them in the service.

Selected reenlistment bonuses are another tactic, he said. In some cases, the Navy has done so well at retention that it does not need to offer retention bonuses for some billets, he said.

“But you got to figure out where to take risk. Can we have some really critical skills that we’re going to need now and going forward? So how do we incentivize those folks correctly?” Cheeseman asked rhetorically.

But while the Navy can retain sailors, getting them in the door is a different issue, Cheeseman said.

It’s unlikely that the Navy will meet its recruiting mission, which set a goal of 40,600 sailors for Fiscal Year 2024, Cheeseman said. The Navy’s goal is higher than its one in Fiscal Year 2023, which the service also missed.

But the Navy saw more contracts in FY 2023 than in FY 2022 despite meeting its goal in FY 2022. In order to meet its recruiting goals, the Navy drained its delayed entry program – the group of people who sign contracts but are not immediately sent to bootcamp, Cheeseman said.

Without the buffer provided by the delayed entry program, the service needs to bring in more people to meet its goal, the personnel chief said.

While the Navy is likely to miss its recruitment goal, the service is slowly closing the gap. Earlier in the year, the service estimated it would miss the mark by 6,700 sailors. Now, it’s at 6,200.

How many sailors the Navy will be short is still unclear, Cheeseman said, but recruiters are working every day to close the gap.

Heather Mongilio

Heather Mongilio

Heather Mongilio is a reporter with USNI News. She has a master’s degree in science journalism and has covered local courts, crime, health, military affairs and the Naval Academy. Follow @hmongilio

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US Army Advances on Key Aviation Modernization Projects Amidst Delays

T he US Army’s advancement of critical aviation projects underscores the service’s commitment to modernization, even in the face of setbacks. A notable one-year delay in fielding its Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) has emerged due to a protest by Lockheed Martin over the Army’s selection of Textron Bell’s V-280 Valor, an advanced tiltrotor aircraft.

The FLRAA competition, a significant aspect of the Army’s aviation modernization efforts, saw Bell’s V-280 pitted against Sikorsky and Boeing’s Defiant X, which boasts coaxial rotor blades. Bell, a subsidiary of Textron, emerged as the winner in late 2022, but the decision was contested by Sikorsky, a Lockheed Martin subsidiary. The protest lodged with the Government Accountability Office (GAO) was ultimately rejected in April 2023.

Despite the procedural hiccup, Major General Wally Rugen, the director of Army aviation in the service’s G-3/5/7 branch, expressed confidence, stating at the Army Aviation Association of America summit, “we are working steadily on the program, and I will say that the team came together this past quarter and did a tremendously detailed plan to look at every aspect of this fielding.” The Army now plans to equip the first unit with the FLRAA in fiscal year 2031, “We really have to look to the limited user test in ’27-’28.”

Jeff Schloesser, Executive Vice President of Strategic Pursuits at Bell, outlined the progress in the program’s design phase. He conveyed that while the preliminary design closely resembles the demonstrator version of the V-280 Valor, some adjustments have been made. Additionally, Bell has taken steps to enhance its production capabilities, with two virtual prototypes expected in the next 12 to 24 months, and the inception of a weapon systems integration lab in Arlington, Texas. “We’re starting to populate that with the systems that we will run — and [the Army] will overwatch — as we go through all of this against the weapons systems. It’s not just the flight controls, it’s the actual weapons system,” he said.

As the Future Long-Range Assault Aircraft moves towards becoming an official program of record, the Army will receive the first aircraft in 2026. Bell is also determining the locations for manufacturing certain components, like drivetrains and rotor blades, with a decision anticipated later in the year.

This development parallels the Army’s reassessment of aviation needs in light of the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine. The Army scrapped the Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) program after recognizing its vulnerability to modern threats like precision munitions and drone swarms. However, the service still endorses the need for the FLRAA’s long-range troop transport capabilities.

Senior Army officials, including Brigadier General Phillip Baker, head of the Future Vertical Lift aviation modernization effort, and Major General Michael McCurry, chief of the Army’s aviation branch, reaffirmed their commitment to the V-280 during the same summit. They emphasized that the FLRAA remains a transformative capability with unmatched speed and range, pivotal for troop movements, supplies, and medical evacuation missions.

In tandem with the FLRAA, the Army is also progressing in its Future Tactical Unmanned Aircraft System (FTUAS) competition, advancing to flight demonstrations with two competing teams, Griffon Aerospace and Textron Systems. This initiative represents another dimension of the Army’s modernization, with the first unit equipped expected in 2026.

Relevant articles:

– US Army to field long-range combat aircraft to first unit in FY31 , Defense News

– US Army still sees need for long-range airborne troop carrier in future conflict , flightglobal.com

– Army heads into competitive flight demos for future tactical drone , Defense News

The US Army’s advancement of critical aviation pr […]

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King Charles Appoints Prince William to Military Role Linked to Prince Harry in Controversial Move

The Prince of Wales is now the Colonel-in-Chief of his brother Prince Harry's former regiment

King Charles has appointed Prince William to a military position with close ties to Prince Harry .

On Monday, May 13, King Charles bestowed the title of Colonel-in-Chief of the Army Air Corps upon his eldest son in a military ceremony at the Army Aviation Centre in Hampshire. In his new role, William, 41, is now the leader of his brother Prince Harry 's former regiment. Harry, 39, trained as an Army Air Corps pilot in 2009, before serving with the Corps during his second tour in Afghanistan up until 2014.

The appointment has sparked controversy as the title was widely thought to have been intended for Harry. The timing of the ceremony announcement, made last week, also raised eyebrows, coinciding with Harry's return to the U.K. for a brief visit to attend the Invictus Games Foundation’s 10th-anniversary celebration at St. Paul’s Cathedral in London on May 8.

PEOPLE understands Harry extended invites to his father, brother and sister-in-law Kate Middleton . However, none of the senior members of the royal family attended the celebration.

Chris Jackson/Getty Images

Princess Kate, 42, has not returned to royal duties after announcing her cancer diagnosis , and is still undergoing treatments. Meanwhile, William conducted investitures at Windsor Castle on the day of the service. A few miles away, Charles and Queen Camilla hosted the first garden party of the season at Buckingham Palace.

A spokesperson for the Duke of Sussex previously confirmed the prince would not see his father during his time in the U.K. "In response to the many inquiries and continued speculation on whether or not The Duke will meet with his father while in the U.K. this week, it unfortunately will not be possible due to His Majesty’s full program," the spokesperson said. "The Duke of course is understanding of his father’s diary of commitments and various other priorities and hopes to see him soon."

AP Photo/Kin Cheung

King Charles first announced the Prince of Wales' appointment in August 2023. In addition to being named Colonel-in-Chief of the Army Air Corps, he was also bestowed the titles of chief of RAF Valley (his old unit from his time in service) and Colonel-in-Chief of The Mercian Regiment.

"I did just want to say what a great joy it is to be with you even briefly on this occasion," King Charles said in a brief speech on May 13, according to Hello! magazine . "But also tinged with great sadness after 32 years of knowing you all and admiring all your many activities and your achievements throughout the time, I've been lucky enough to be Colonel-in-Chief of the Army Air Corps."

"So all I can say is that having had the pleasure of knowing you for so long, I do hope you'll go from strength to strength in the future with the Prince of Wales as your new Colonel-in-Chief," he continued, proceeding to praise Prince William's aerial skills.

"The great thing is he's a very good pilot indeed so that's encouraging. So ladies and gentlemen, look after yourselves and, and, and I can't tell you how proud it has made me to be involved with you all this time," the sovereign said.

On Monday, Charles met William in front of an Apache helicopter, where he officially passed the title over to his son. After the ceremony, Charles and William met with serving aircrew in front of the aircraft.

Charles then departed the event, leaving the prince to carry out his first engagement as the Army Air Corps' Colonel-in-Chief. William received a briefing from Lieutenant General Borton before meeting with soldiers in the regiment. He concluded his day by departing in an Apache capability flight to give him a better understanding of the equipment, as well as the people who operate it.

Ben Birchall/PA Images via Getty Images

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Both Harry and William are trained military pilots, but while Harry served with the Army Air Corps, the Prince of Wales served as a search and rescue pilot for three years.

Following his brief visit to the U.K., Harry and Meghan Markle headed to Nigeria for their first visit to the country. The couple arrived on May 10, and began their tour by visiting a local school in Nigeri called the Lightway Academy.

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During their visit to the school, Meghan, 42, expressed how proud she is of Harry after he gave a speech on mental health to the children in the school.

“You see why I'm married to him?” Meghan said to the students and faculty. “It’s so inspiring because he speaks the truth.”

Meghan and Harry's trip to Nigeria marks their first international tour since stepping away from their royal duties in 2020. The couple were invited to visit the country by its Chief of Defense Staff, the highest-ranking military official.

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