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  • 1 What is the Quick Access Toolbar?
  • 2 Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar
  • 3 Accessing the Keyboard Shortcuts

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What is the Quick Access Toolbar?

The Quick Access Toolbar (some call it the Quick Launch Toolbar) is a feature that was added to Excel 2007 that added an extra set of buttons above the normal menus on the Excel Ribbon. You can see it circled here:

Quick Access Toolbar

Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar

You can customize the buttons that appear on the Quick Access Toolbar by clicking the drop-down menu at the end and choosing  More Commands…

Customize Toolbar

If it’s too hard to find them on the list, you can browse the menu tabs, and right-click icons you like to add them to the Quick Access Toolbar .

Right Click To Add

Accessing the Keyboard Shortcuts

Having a custom toolbar is great, but that’s not even the best part about the Quick Access Toolbar . The toolbar has keyboard shortcuts built in!

Press  ALT and they are revealed…

Keyboard Shortcuts

In my example above,  ALT+1 saves the active workbook.  ALT+4 brings up the Freeze Panes dialog.  ALT-6  launches Solver . You can re-arrange the order of the shortcuts to put your favorites closer to the front. All that, and no Macros or VBA in sight!

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Quick Access Toolbar in Excel: how to customize, move, reset and share

Svetlana Cheusheva

In this tutorial, we will have an in-depth look at how to use and customize Quick Access Toolbar in Excel 2010, Excel 2013, Excel 2016, Excel 2019, Excel 2021 and Excel 365.

Getting to the commands you use most often should be easy. And it is exactly what the Quick Access Toolbar is designed for. Add your favorite commands to the QAT so they are only a click away no matter what ribbon tab you currently have open.

What is Quick Access Toolbar?

The Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) is a small customizable toolbar at the top of the Office application window that contains a set of frequently used commands. These commands can be accessed from almost any part of the application, independent of the ribbon tab that is currently opened.

The Quick Access Toolbar has a drop-down menu containing a predefined set of the default commands, which may be displayed or hidden. Additionally, it includes an option to add your own commands.

There is no limit to a maximum number of commands on the QAT, although not all the commands may be visible depending on the size of your screen.

Where is Quick Access Toolbar in Excel?

Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

How to customize Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

By default, the Excel Quick Access Toolbar contains only 3 buttons: Save , Undo and Redo . If there are a few other commands that you use frequently, you can add them to the Quick Access Toolbar too.

Below, we will show you how to customize the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel, but the instructions are the same for other Office applications such as Outlook, Word, PowerPoint, etc.

Quick Access Toolbar: what can and what cannot be changed

Microsoft provides many customization options for the QAT, but still there are certain things that cannot be done.

What can be customized

You are free to personalize the Quick Access Toolbar with things like:

  • Add your own commands
  • Change the order of commands, both default and custom.
  • Display the QAT in one of the two possible locations.
  • Add macros to the Quick Access Toolbar.
  • Export and import your customizations.

What cannot be customized

Here's a list of things that cannot be changed:

  • You can only add commands to the Quick Access Toolbar. Individual list items (e.g. spacing values) and individual styles cannot be added. However, you can add the whole list or entire style gallery.
  • Only command icons can be displayed, not text labels .
  • You cannot resize the Quick Access Toolbar buttons. The only way to change the buttons size is to change your screen resolution.
  • The Quick Access Toolbar cannot be displayed on multiple lines . If you've added more commands than space available, some commands won't be visible. To view them, click the More controls button.

3 ways to get to the Customize Quick Access Toolbar window

Most customizations to the QAT are done in the Customize Quick Access Toolbar window, which is part of the Excel Options dialog box. You can open this window in one of the following ways:

  • Click File > Options > Quick Access Toolbar .

How to add a command button to Quick Access Toolbar

Depending on what kind of command you'd like to add, this can be done in 3 different ways.

Enable a command from the predefined list

To enable a currently hidden command from the predefined list, this is what you need to do:

  • Click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button - the small down arrow at the end of the toolbar.
  • In the list of the displayed commands, click the one you wish to enable. Done!

Add a ribbon button to Quick Access Toolbar

The fastest way to add to the QAT a command that appears on the ribbon is this:

  • Right-click the desired command on the ribbon.
  • Select the Add to Quick Access Toolbar in the context menu.

Add a command that isn't on the ribbon to Quick Access Toolbar

To add a button that is not available on the ribbon, carry out these steps:

  • Right-click the ribbon and click Customize Quick Access Toolbar… .
  • In the Choose commands from drop-down list on the left, select Commands Not in the Ribbon .
  • In the list of commands on the left, click the command you want to add.
  • Click the Add button.
  • Click OK to save the changes.

How to remove a command from Quick Access Toolbar

Rearrange commands on quick access toolbar.

To change the order of the QAT commands, do the following:

  • Open the Customize the Quick Access Toolbar window.
  • Under Customize Quick Access Toolbar on the right, select the command that you want to move, and click the Move Up or Move Down arrow.

Group commands on Quick Access Toolbar

If your QAT contains quite a lot of commands, you may want to sub-divide them into logical groups, for instance, separating the default and custom commands.

Though the Quick Access Toolbar does not allow creating groups like on the Excel ribbon, you can group commands by adding a separator. Here's how:

  • Open the Customize the Quick Access Toolbar dialog window.
  • In the Choose commands from drop-down list on the left, pick Popular Commands .
  • In the list of commands on the left, select <Separator> and click Add .
  • Click the Move Up or Move Down arrow to position the separator where needed.

Grouping commands on the Quick Access Toolbar

Add macros to Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

To have your favorite macros at your fingertips, you can add them to the QAT too. To have it done, please follow these steps:

  • In the Choose commands from drop-down list on the left, select Macros .
  • In the list of macros, select the one you wish to add to the Quick Access Toolbar.
  • Click OK to save the changes and close the dialog box.

Customize Quick Access Toolbar for the current workbook only

By default, the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel is customized for all workbooks.

Please note that the customizations made for the current workbook do not replace the existing QAT commands but are added to them.

How to move Quick Access Toolbar below or above the ribbon

The default location of the Quick Access Toolbar is at the top of the Excel window, above the ribbon. If you find it more convenient to have the QAT below the ribbon, here's how you can move it:

  • Click the Customize Quick Access Toolbar button.

Move Quick Access Toolbar below the ribbon.

Reset Quick Access Toolbar to the default settings

If you wish to discard all your customizations and revert the QAT back to its original setup, you can reset it in this way:

Resetting Quick Access Toolbar to the default settings

Export and import a custom Quick Access Toolbar

Microsoft Excel allows saving your Quick Access Toolbar and ribbon customizations into a file that can be imported later. This can help you keep your Excel interface looking the same on all the computers that you use as well as share your customizations with your colleagues.

Export and import a customized Quick Access Toolbar.

  • The file that you export and import also includes the ribbon customizations . Unfortunately, there is no easy way to export or import only the Quick Access Toolbar.
  • When you import the customizations file to a given PC, all prior ribbon and QAT customizations on that PC are permanently lost. To be able to restore your current customizations in the future, be sure to export them and save as a backup copy before importing any new customizations.

That's how you customize and use the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel. I thank you for reading and hope to see you on our blog next week!

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15 comments

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Great explanation, especially the part about Exporting adn Importing and the consequences for the system it's used on. I was looking for an option to add a drop-down context menu to show a list of actions instead of using the more button but I think that'll have to wait for future updates

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Excel should have a setting so that, as soon as editing has taken place on a spreadsheet, the icon for saving the spreadsheet would change to a different color and would stay that way until the sheet has been saved - then it would go back to its normal/neutral color.

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

My top line top green header bar has disappeared from Excel. Any ideas as how to make it reappear?.

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

how do you remove the text next to the icon in QAT?

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Quick Access Tool bar keep disappear every time I close the excel 365. Does anyone have any ideas how to fix it ?.

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Thank you so much for this

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Please how do i add Pick tool to the quick access

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

how do you organise move add delete and change the position of the buttons on quick access toolbar practice and make a note of them

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Thanks for this ???

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Hello, Pay attention to the following paragraph of the article above https://www.ablebits.com/office-addins-blog/quick-access-toolbar-excel-customize/#customize-Quick-Access-Toolbar

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Thank you for your feedback! It sounds like it might be helpful to connect you to one of our Office support agents.

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

As my QAT is rather extensive and I want to maximize screen space, I have my QAT display in the top green header bar in Excel. Is there any way to remove or alter the display of text after the filename in this green bar? I currently have "[filename].xls - Saved to OneDrive - [Company name]" which is a complete waste of space in my opinion. Suggestions welcome (I realize I can display the QAT below the ribbon).

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Thanks, Svetlana

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ExcelDemy

How to Customize the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

Kawser Ahmed ExcelDemy.com Founder and Excel Expert

The Quick Access Toolbar is a customizable toolbar in Excel that provides quick access to frequently used commands. However, a user may not find all the commands they require for their particular work in the Quick Access Toolbar’s default settings. Customizing Excel’s Quick Access Toolbar is useful in this situation.

In this article, we will explore how to customize the Quick Access Toolbar ( QAT ) in Excel. Adding or removing commands, moving the toolbar, making custom buttons, altering the icon and name of commands, resetting the toolbar, and sharing personalized toolbars with others are some of the subjects we’ll discuss. The readers of this article will be able to customize their Quick Access Toolbar in accordance with their demands and streamline their work process, which will eventually save them time and increase their Excel productivity.

Below is an overview image of customized the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel.

overview image of customized quick access toolbar

What Is the Quick Access Toolbar?

The QAT is a small customizable toolbar that is located at the top of the Excel’s application window. Mainly it contains a set of commands that are used frequently. Independent of the ribbon tab that is now open, these commands can be accessed from practically anywhere in the application.

The QAT contains a drop-down icon where you will find default commands. You can add or hide a command from there. It also has an option to add your own command.

How to Show QAT in Excel

Here, we will show you how you can show the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel by using any tab from the ribbon.

  • Firstly, right-click on any tab from the Ribbon .
  • Secondly, select Show Quick Access Toolbar .

selecting Show Quick Access Toolbar

  • Now, you will see the QAT .

showing QAT

How to Customize the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel: 7 Easy Tricks

By default, QAT is in the upper left corner of the Excel window although you can change its position to suit your needs. This QAT contains a set of frequently used commands. Now, these commands may vary from user to user depending on their needs. So, we will see in this tutorial how to set up this QAT for our own work requirements.

1. Moving the Quick Access Toolbar Above the Ribbon

One of the common ways to customize the QAT is to move it above or below the ribbon in Excel. We will see how to achieve this using the following method.

  • Here, we can see the Quick Access toolbar below the Ribbon in Excel. Now, we want to move it above the Ribbon .

customize quick access toolbar

  • First, right-click on the QAT and select Show Quick Access Toolbar Above the Ribbon .

selecting show quick access toolbar above the ribbon option

  • As a result, this will move the QAT above the ribbon as you can see in the image below.

moving QAT above the ribbon

2. Adding a Command to the Quick Access Toolbar

If you want to add a command to the QAT in Excel that you use frequently, then you can customize it as we have shown below.

  • To start with, click on the drop-down icon and select More Commands .

selecting More Commands option

  • Immediately, this will open the Excel Options window where you can see the Quick Access Toolbar .
  • Here, select a command from the commands list and click Add .
  • Now, this will add the command to the command list on the right side.
  • Finally, click OK .

adding Calculate Now Command

  • Therefore, you will get QAT with the Calculate Now command.

adding command to QAT

3. Removing a Command from the Quick Access Toolbar

Sometimes you may want to clear up the Quick Access Toolbar a bit by removing unused commands. You can customize the removal by following the steps below.

  • Here, in the below image, we can see QAT with the Calculate Now command. We now want to get rid of this command.
  • First, click the drop-down arrow and then choose More Commands .

selecting More Commands option

  • Therefore, the Excel Options window will appear.
  • Now, select a command that you want to remove from the right side box and click <<Remove .
  • Similarly, you can continue to remove more commands and once you are done, click OK .

removing Calculate Now command

  • Therefore, you will see that QAT is without the Calculate Now command.

removing command from quick access toolbar

4. Hiding Quick Access Toolbar

You can also customize the QAT by hiding it from the Excel window. Follow the steps below to do this.

  • Initially, click on the Ribbon Display Options icon.
  • As a result, the below menu appears. Now click on the Auto-hide Ribbon option to hide the Excel Ribbon completely.

clicking on the Auto-hide Ribbon

  • Consequently, you will see that the Ribbon is hidden from the Excel window as shown in the below screenshot.

hiding QAT

  • You can display the Excel Ribbon by clicking on the three dots located in the top right corner of the Excel window (next to Ribbon Display Options ). Or you can press the Alt key from the keyboard to go to any tabs.
  • You can again show the Excel Ribbon by clicking on the Ribbon Display Options and choosing any of the options shown below.

unhiding QAT

5. Changing Order of Commands

There is the option to customize the order of commands in the QAT if you need it. See the steps below.

  • Now, select a command that you want to re-order and use the up-down arrow on the right.
  • Next, once you are happy with the order, click OK .

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

  • Therefore, you will get the following output.

changing order of commands

6. Grouping Commands in Quick Access Toolbar

It may be a good idea to customize the QAT by grouping similar commands together. Let us see how we can do this.

  • Next, select <Separator> from the list of commands and click Add .
  • As a result, all the commands that are above the Separator Line will now form a group.
  • Finally, once you are done with grouping click OK .

adding the separator

7. Add Macros to the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

Here, we will show you how to add a macro to QAT using the Customize Quick Access Toolbar in Excel.

  • First, click on the Customize Quick Access Toolbar drop-down button.
  • Next, click on More Commands .

selecting More Commands option

  • Now, the Excel Options box will appear.
  • After that, select Macros from the drop-down list on the left.
  • Next, select your macro and click the Add button. Here, we will select the TimeStamp macro.
  • Now, to change the icon or displayed text, click the Modify button .

Adding Macro in the QAT

  • Next, the Modify Button box will appear.
  • Then, type a name as Display name . Here, we will type Timestamp .
  • After that, select any Symbol .
  • Finally, click on OK .

selecting modify button

  • Then, click on OK .

click ok to get the output

  • After that, select the cell where you want to insert the current time.
  • Next, click on TimeStamp to run the macro from your Quick Access Toolbar .

click on QAT

  • Finally, the macro will run using the Quick Access Toolbox.

adding entry time

  • Similarly, you can add all the other values in the dataset.

adding other values in the dataset

8. Customize the Quick Access Toolbar for the Current Workbook Only

If you want to customize the QAT for the current Excel workbook only, then this method can help you do that. Follow the steps below to see how.

  • Then, from the drop-down, select the current workbook to apply the commands.
  • Finally, click OK to confirm.

choosing current workbook

Reset Quick Access Toolbar to Default Settings in Excel

If you want to remove all of your adjustments and return the QAT to its original configuration, you may reset it as follows:

  • Next, select the Reset button, and then choose Reset only Quick Access Toolbar .

selecting Reset option

Export and Import a Custom Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

If you want to export or import a custom QAT in Excel, you have to follow the following steps.

  • To export a QAT, you need to select Import/Export , then choose Export all customizations , and finally save the customization file to another folder.
  • To import a QAT, you need to select Import/Export , choose Import customization file , and then browse for the customization file that you saved previously.

selecting Import/Export option

Keyboard Shortcuts for Quick Access Toolbar

In addition, you can use the QATr’s buttons by using a keyboard shortcut. Excel displays all of the keyboard shortcuts for the QAT when you hit ALT .

showing the keyboard shortcuts for QAT

The QAT commands assign numbers to shortcut keys, as seen in the screenshot above.

Excel Quick Access Toolbar Missing

Sometimes the Quick Access Toolbar might be missing from the Excel window. There can be many reasons for this. But below, we will show you one of the most common ways to bring the missing QAT back.

  • To begin with, right-click on any of the tabs and select the Show Quick Access Toolbar .

selecting Show Quick Access Toolbar option

  • Consequently, this should bring the missing QAT above the ribbon as in the image below.

showing QAT above the ribbon

Frequently Asked Questions

1. What is a Quick Access Toolbar in Excel?

One-click access to frequently used operations like Save, Undo, Redo, and Print is made possible via Excel’s Quick Access Toolbar, a resizable toolbar. It is placed above the Ribbon by default, but you can relocate it there if you’d rather.

By adding your commonly used commands or buttons to the Quick Access Toolbar, you may personalize it. You have two options for adding commands to the Quick Access Toolbar: either right-click the command and choose “Add to Quick Access Toolbar” or click the dropdown arrow at the end of the toolbar and choose “More Commands.” You may then select the commands you want to add to the toolbar from there.

You may save time and enhance the Quick Access Toolbar by customizing it.

2. How do I change the icon and name of a custom command in the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel?

To change the icon and name of a custom command in the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel, right-click on the command in the toolbar and select “Modify Button Image” or “Modify Button Text.”

3. How do I restore the default settings of the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel?

To restore the default settings of the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel, click on the dropdown arrow at the end of the toolbar and select “Customize Quick Access Toolbar.” Then, select “Reset” at the bottom of the window.

4. Is it possible to have different Quick Access Toolbars for different workbooks in Excel?

Yes, it is possible to have different Quick Access Toolbars for different workbooks in Excel. To do this, you can customize the toolbar for each workbook separately.

Things to Remember

There is no maximum limit for adding commands to your Quick Access Toolbar . But, depending on the size of your screen you may not be able to see all of them at the same time.

Download Practice Workbook

Download this practice workbook to exercise while you are reading this article.

That’s the end of today’s session. I strongly believe that from now you may be able to customize the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel. You will be able to add or remove commands, move the toolbar, make custom buttons, alter the icon and name of commands, reset the toolbar, and share personalized toolbars with others. If you have any questions please, let me know in the comment section below.

Customize Quick Access Toolbar: Knowledge Hub

  • How to Add the Fill Color Icon to the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

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Kawser Ahmed

Kawser Ahmed is a Microsoft Excel Expert, Udemy Course Instructor, Data Analyst, Finance professional, and Chief Editor of ExcelDemy. He is the founder and CEO of SOFTEKO (a software and content marketing company). He has a B.Sc in Electrical and Electronics Engineering. As a Udemy instructor, he offers 8 acclaimed Excel courses, one selected for Udemy Business. A devoted MS Excel enthusiast, Kawser has contributed over 200 articles and reviewed thousands more. His expertise extends to Data Analysis,... Read Full Bio

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Excel Quick Access Toolbar

QAT

The Excel Quick Access Toolbar or QAT as it’s also known is not only a handy place for commonly used icons, but it also enables some super easy keyboard shortcuts for your favourite tools.

The QAT sits either above or below the ribbon. I prefer to place it above the ribbon as this takes up less space because it sits in the green header bar:

Excel Quick Access Toolbar above ribbon

Whereas below the ribbon adds an extra row to my header area, although the upside is you get nice, coloured icons which are easier to see at a glance:

Excel Quick Access Toolbar below ribbon

You can change the location of the QAT via the drop down:

Excel Quick Access Toolbar drop down menu

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Quick Access Toolbar Keyboard Shortcuts

Adding an icon to the QAT is as easy as right-clicking on the icon > Add to Quick Access Toolbar:

add icons to Quick Access Toolbar

Alternatively, you can click on the drop down at the end of the QAT and choose from popular commands, or open the ‘More Commands’ dialog box as shown with the star in the list in the image below:

Quick Access Toolbar More Commands

The More Commands dialog box allows you to search through all icons available and add them to the QAT:

Customize the Quick Access Toolbar

QAT Keyboard Shortcuts

The first 9 positions in the QAT are the most prime real estate in Excel because with the click of two keys you have a very handy set of keyboard shortcuts. Pressing the ALT key and then a number from 1 to 9 is the equivalent of clicking the icons with your mouse. In the image below you can see the number for each icon which appears after pressing ALT:

Excel Quick Access Toolbar keyboard shortcuts

It’s as simple as learning the number for each icon and you’re off and running!

Note: you can also access the icons after position 9 by entering their number code e.g. the undo icon is number 09 so the shortcut is ALT > 0 > 9, it’s just not quite as nice as entering a single number. And of course, in the case of Undo, it’s easier to press CTRL+Z.

Which Icons to put in the Quick Access Toolbar

There’s no perfect list of icons to include in the Quick Access Toolbar, but for such a prime piece of Excel real estate it’s important to consider what gets a spot based on some strict criteria.

For me that criteria are as follows:

  • There must not already be a super easy keyboard shortcut. e.g. don’t put copy, paste or undo up there. Everyone knows CTRL+C, CTRL+V and CTRL+Z are the keyboard shortcuts for these most commonly used commands.

Clear All icon

  • And of course, it should be something I use regularly. Just because I have an icon in my QAT doesn’t mean you should. If you don’t use Power Pivot, then don’t waste a spot in your QAT with the Power Pivot icon. And remember to update it regularly. Work habits change, so be sure to update your QAT in line with your current needs.

Mynda’s QAT

In case you’re wondering what’s in my QAT, below is a list of the icons:

Mynda's Quick Access Toolbar

You might be wondering why I have some icons I expressly said not to include, so I’ll explain:

  • Paste Values – although there’s a couple of keyboard shortcuts for this, none are as short as ALT > 1
  • Clear All requires two clicks to get to the button and it’s something I use regularly to clear PivotTables, which the DELETE key simply can’t handle.
  • Clear All Filters is super handy when working with Excel Tables, which I do a lot.
  • Refresh All is great for refreshing all queries and PivotTables in a workbook. There’s a keyboard shortcut, CTRL+ALT+F5 but I find it cumbersome.
  • Launch Power Query Editor – there’s no practical keyboard shortcut for getting to this and it’s at least a two click task depending on the route you take.
  • Insert PivotTable – at least a couple of clicks or a cumbersome keyboard shortcut ALT > N > V > T
  • Open Power Pivot Window – at least a couple of clicks unless you’re lucky enough to be on the correct tab of the ribbon when you need it.
  • Select Objects – I use this all the time and it bugs me having to click so many times to get to it.
  • Manage Conditional Formatting Rules – at least two clicks and the option is at the bottom of a long list, which bugs me!

Undo Icon

  • Redo – same as for Redo
  • Save – I have autosave always turned on these days, but sometimes I like the satisfaction of clicking the button and knowing that the file is actually saving. Call me old fashioned!

Mynda Treacy

CIMA qualified Accountant with over 25 years experience in roles such as Global IT Financial Controller for investment banking firms Barclays Capital and NatWest Markets.

Mynda has been awarded Microsoft MVP status every year since 2014 for her expertise and contributions to educating people about Microsoft Excel.

Mynda teaches several courses here at MOTH including Excel Expert , Excel Dashboards , Power BI , Power Query and Power Pivot .

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Reader Interactions

Random User

November 5, 2022 at 10:51 am

I have enjoyed and hugely benefited from your YouTubes. I didn’t know of this site; I just stumbled onto here from using Google for a specific Excel issue. You do excellent work on the site as well as the videos. Thank you hugely for your unselfish contributions to all of us.

November 5, 2022 at 10:42 am

The “trick” for more than 9 with the ASCII number code is brilliant, as well as shrewd comprehension and explanation of the QAT 9 slot scarcity and value of economizing the 9 assignments. But here’s an approach to put, oh, even 30 operations if you want to, on one single QAT icon. It requires use of VBA.

First I should note that I write many VBA macros, always available in PERSONAL, and some I use SO commonly that I assign them to QAT slots. But inevitably I run out of slots. So the “trick” is to have one macro that serves as an interface to many macros, by dropdown or a Form or however you wish, given your VBA capabilities. And note that each “sub macro”, as you might describe them, might just do 1 simple Application.Run. Even if you don’t do VBA, or want faster execution as Application.Run might yield, the learning curve to get just that far is small.

As to a dropdown, here’s a technique. For brevity let’s consider only 3 “sub macros” instead of 30 or 300. Then make the VBA-accessed dropdown be assigned as a user macro on alt-4, and have in the dropdown A Launch Power Query Editor B Insert PivotTable C Select Objects

The payoff is you get to go alt-4, C, enter. Not exactly hideous. Maybe even alt-4, C if there’s a dropdown option to “select and perform” an item (I can’t recall if Excel VBA accessed dropdowns have that property).

I’d love to hear if anyone tries or benefits from this. You do need to set it up in VBA and put in PERSONAL, but if you’re fluent in VBA this might pay off a thousand fold, who knows.

November 5, 2022 at 10:41 am

Your article is valuable and clear. I like it. Bookmarked it. Here I’ll offer some hopefully useful additions.

Microsoft is a cruel monster, blending being forced to accept insanely stupid design decisions (with no option to decline), but sometimes you can blunt the damage by “making compromises” such as finding ways to do things in 3 strokes that never required more than 1 before. You might choose to make the compromises below, since, as you astutely explain, the “prime” collection is limited to a scarce 9. (Funny, before the murderously productivity assassinating 2007 ribbon I used to have 36 alt- shortcuts with icons or text atop the window, but that’s another story. MS, making the world a better place.)

Manage conditional formats is not tragic; you can still go alt-O-D. More expensive than alt-9, but just by one stroke, and you gain a precious “prime slot”, a “small compromise” to gain a “slot”.

Clear all – I go alt-E-A zillions of times daily on cells. If that’s no good for pivot tables, get comfy with this shortcut anyway. Consider this compromise to regain the alt-2 slot?

Clear filters – again it MIGHT be insufficient in some categories (Tables?) but alt-D-F-S rules. That will unfilter all regular (or advanced) cell filters. Note that this is generally superior to alt-D-F-F which removes the filtering entirely when you toggle it off, meaning to reinstitute the filtering later, you must rebuild (if you can remember!) which columns were filtered, as well as the top and the bottom of the filter area! alt-D-F-S remove the “filtering”, not the “filter”.

Paste values – no doubt alt-1 is superior. But note alt-E-S-V is close, so evaluate “prime real estate” as before. But at any rate be sure you investigate Control-Shift-V, depending on your Excel version. Hard to type, but only one stroke!

I chose the above only because they are QAT choices made in the article. Much more could be said about optimal shortcuts usage. MS catastrophically made it painful to find shortcuts now but there are many out there and even if slightly more work than “alt-4”, sometimes the compromise is worth it. I use shortcuts more than any human in the solar system. Despite Microsoft’s clue-clue-clueless damage to their productive use with the ribbon (because before you could browse every menu item and SEE the shortcut strokes – unfathomable that the designers couldn’t grasp that they ruined that, and shattered productivity) – I still use them to an inhumanly great degree. I hope this little discussion of shortcuts makes someone faster and more accurate and productive 🙂

July 1, 2021 at 7:36 am

Mynda, I really appreciate your excellent tips with Excel! I also use the quick access toolbar and find it frustrating when I use different PCs that do not have my favorite tools saved. Often, if your IT department needs to update (or reformat) your work PC, many customizations are reset. Thanks for sharing the tools you use and I have made a copy of my own toolbar in case I need to create on a new PC. I know you are so wired with the latest Excel updates – have you ever done a command toolbar options comparison between versions. Do new toolbar options get noticed between updates, or do Microsoft add new buttons and we just need to discover them haphazardly? Thank you for helping the world with Excel You are a hero. -Krist (kristwalicky.com)

Mynda Treacy

July 1, 2021 at 9:35 am

Great to hear you enjoyed my tutorial! Microsoft do announce changes, but they’re not easy to find. I haven’t done a toolbar options comparison. I typically find out about new features via my Microsoft MVP email list when other MVPs email about them L0(

June 4, 2021 at 12:03 am

I’m still amazed at the number of experienced Office users who are unaware of this

here’s mine, which has been largely unchanged for a decade, so I often confuse myself on someone else’s set up when I try to use what I think is a standard shortcut

1. freeze pane toggle, because no-one seems to do this with spreadsheets they send me! 2. autofilter on current value 3. autofit column width on current cell, used more than any other QAT, except 5 4. back, often followed by paste values 5. paste values 6-9. commonly used border commands (eg alt-9,8,7 gets me a thick RH border)

and then many higher ones, often for the same reasons (eg Undo, so I can see the stack), some just for the visual (eg wrap text which shows if the current cell is wrapped or not)

June 4, 2021 at 3:58 pm

Thanks for sharing, Jim!

November 5, 2022 at 10:49 am

Jim, since like everyone you’re plagued by the limit of 9, maybe consider memorizing these shortcuts to free up slots: alt-W-F-F to toggle Freeze. The Microsoft Deproductivity department is very proud of this one, because they diabolically recognized that alt-W-F (which has been there forever) was too easy. alt-O-C-A for the autofit. I too go alt-O-C-A often, easily 60 times per day; going alt-3 wouldbe nicer, but, it’s a tradeoff for the limit of 9 slots, you know? Ctrl-shift-V for paste by value. This is I believe a relatively recent addition so may be Excel version dependent.

I like you scheme. Just offering some hopefully helpful tweaks.

June 3, 2021 at 10:44 pm

My company has a Group policy setting that deletes my custom QAT every few minutes. It must cost the company a lot in staff time, but they keep saying I’m the only person who has complained! I used to keep a copy to import on my Desktop, but if you import it you have to minimise and maximise to make it visible. By which time the policy may have reset it anyway. So it is back to finding things on the Ribbon… Adios QAT, you are much missed …

June 4, 2021 at 6:48 pm

What a shame, Andy! I suppose it’s their loss, but still very frustrating for you.

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Finish spreadsheets faster, quick access with keyboard shortcuts.

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This tip gives you a quick way to access your most used commands using keyboard shortcuts.

The Quick Tip shows how to access items in the Quick Access Toolar with the keyboard.

The Bonus Tip lets you customize which commands are included in the Quick Access Toolbar.

With the Expert Tip you can even customize it using only the keyboard!

We hope you find these tips useful.

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Keyboard shortcuts for quick access

The Quick Access Toolbar sits across the top of the Excel screen or window, just above the ribbon toolbar. It is used for quick access to your most commonly used commands or toolbar buttons.

You can use the following keyboard shortcuts to access the commands or buttons in the customizable Quick Access Toolbar:

For example

Quick Access Toolbar example

If your Quick Access Toolbar looks like the one above, the shortcuts will be:

This is only an example; the assignment of shortcuts to commands depends on which items are in your Quick Access Toolbar and the order in which they appear.

If some commands are not available, the other shortcuts do not change. For example, if “Paste” is item 3 but is not available (because you have not copied anything), then item 4 is still shortcut 4; it does not become shortcut 3.

More items in the Quick Access Toolbar

These shortcuts show you how to quickly access any of the first nine items in the Quick Access Toolbar.

If you have more, the others can still be accessed using keyboard shortcuts but will take an additional key press:

  • Alt then 0 then 9 will invoke the 10th item
  • Alt then 0 then 8 will invoke the 11th item
  • Alt then 0 then 7 will invoke the 12th item

You can only have one row of items in the Quick Access Toolbar; it cannot be resized into two rows. If you fill it, any additional items then go into a dropdown button at the end.

Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar

See the Bonus tip for how to customize the Quick Access Toolbar.

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Quick Access Toolbar shortcut keys

Following up on your yesterday’s tip ; I attach a file quite often and use some other commands with long keyboard sequences quite often as well.

Is there any way I can do this quicker instead of typing this (not intuitive) keyboard sequence?

Keyboard Shortcuts button

When adding commands to the Quick Access Toolbar, they’ll get a easy to discover and remember keyboard shortcut as well.

Quick Access Toolbar

Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) button

You can make it either float above (standard) or under the Ribbon. The “Show below the Ribbon” option can be found by pressing the down arrow on the right of the QAT.

It holds some defaults actions like; Send/Receive, Save, Undo, Redo, Previous Item and Next Item.

ALT keyboard sequences for the QAT

ALT Key button

  • When you add even more commands, they get a letter indication in alphabetical order from 0A – 0Z.

Press ALT and then the number for your QAT command to execute it.

Adding a command to the QAT

Add to QAT button

Another way to customize the QAT is via the Options dialog.

  • File-> Options-> Quick Access Toolbar

You can use the “Choose commands from” drop down list at the top of the left pane to select a category of options to choose from.

Simply select the command that you want to add, press the Add button in the middle and sort them accordingly.

Customizing the Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) via the Outlook Options dialog.

Related Content

  • Enable the Quick Access Toolbar in the New Office for Microsoft 365 (and show it above the Ribbon)
  • Backing up all Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar (QAT) customizations at once
  • Backup Quick Access Toolbar settings
  • Print via keyboard shortcut bug in Outlook 2010
  • Quick Commands Bar to Delete, Reply, Move etc… on the right side of a message
  • Related Categories: Configuring • Interface • Mail Composing

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Excel Tutorial: How To Create Shortcut On Excel

Introduction.

As we all know, Excel is a powerful tool for managing and analyzing data. One way to increase efficiency and productivity while using Excel is by utilizing keyboard shortcuts . In this tutorial, we will provide a step-by-step guide on how to create custom shortcuts in Excel, allowing you to streamline your workflow and save valuable time.

Key Takeaways

  • Keyboard shortcuts in Excel can significantly increase efficiency and productivity.
  • Understanding and utilizing commonly used shortcuts is essential for mastering Excel.
  • Creating custom shortcuts in Excel can streamline workflow and save time.
  • Practicing and memorizing shortcuts is crucial for effectively using them in daily Excel usage.
  • Customizing and managing shortcuts according to personal preference can further enhance productivity.

Understanding Excel Shortcuts

Excel is a powerful tool that helps in managing and organizing data efficiently. One way to increase productivity while working with Excel is to use shortcuts. Shortcuts are a faster and more efficient way to navigate and perform tasks in Excel. In this tutorial, we will discuss the importance of shortcuts in increasing productivity and the commonly used shortcuts in Excel.

Importance of shortcuts in increasing productivity

Using shortcuts in Excel can significantly increase productivity by saving time and reducing the need for repetitive mouse clicks. By mastering keyboard shortcuts, users can perform tasks more quickly and easily, allowing them to focus on analyzing data rather than navigating through menus and options.

Commonly used shortcuts in Excel

There are several commonly used shortcuts in Excel that can help users work more efficiently. Some of the most common shortcuts include:

  • Selecting cells: Ctrl + Shift + Arrow Key to quickly select a block of cells.
  • Copying and pasting: Ctrl + C to copy and Ctrl + V to paste.
  • Undo and redo: Ctrl + Z to undo and Ctrl + Y to redo.
  • Formatting: Ctrl + B for bold, Ctrl + I for italics, and Ctrl + U for underline.
  • Inserting and deleting: Ctrl + Shift + + to insert a new row or column, and Ctrl + - to delete a row or column.
  • AutoSum: Alt + = to quickly sum a column or row of numbers.

How to Create a Shortcut in Excel

Creating a shortcut in Excel can save you time and streamline your workflow. Whether it's a custom shortcut for a specific function or a macro, you can easily create and assign shortcuts in Excel.

Step 1: Open Excel

Launch Microsoft Excel on your computer.

Step 2: Access the Quick Access Toolbar

Click on the down arrow at the end of the Quick Access Toolbar located at the top left corner of the Excel window.

Step 3: Choose More Commands

Select "More Commands" from the dropdown menu. This will open the Excel Options window.

Step 4: Customize the Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar

In the Excel Options window, click on the "Customize Ribbon" option on the left sidebar. Then, select "All Commands" from the "Choose commands from" dropdown menu.

Step 5: Select the Function or Macro

Scroll through the list of commands and select the function or macro for which you want to create a shortcut.

Step 6: Add the Function or Macro to the Quick Access Toolbar

Click on the "Add" button to add the selected function or macro to the Quick Access Toolbar. This will create a shortcut for the chosen command.

Step 7: Save the Changes

Click "OK" to save the changes and exit the Excel Options window. You will now see the custom shortcut added to the Quick Access Toolbar.

Step 1: Open the Excel Options Window

Follow steps 1 through 3 from the previous section to access the Excel Options window.

Step 2: Customize the Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar

Click on the "Customize Ribbon" option on the left sidebar. Then, select "Macros" from the "Choose commands from" dropdown menu.

Step 3: Select the Macro

Scroll through the list of available macros and select the one for which you want to assign a shortcut key.

Step 4: Assign a Shortcut Key

Click on the "New" button to open the "New Group" dialog box. Then, select the macro from the left column and press the desired key combination in the "Press new shortcut key" field. Click "Assign" to confirm the shortcut key assignment.

Step 5: Save the Changes

Click "OK" to save the changes and exit the Excel Options window. You can now use the assigned shortcut key to execute the selected macro.

Tips for Using Shortcuts Effectively

Shortcuts in Excel can significantly improve your efficiency and productivity. Here are some tips for utilizing them effectively:

Consistency is key:

Focus on frequently used functions:, repetition and muscle memory:, customize your toolbar:, prioritize important shortcuts:, explore additional customization options:, customizing and managing shortcuts.

Excel offers the flexibility to customize and manage shortcuts according to your personal preference. This allows you to work more efficiently and tailor the program to fit your specific needs.

Excel provides the option to modify existing shortcuts to better suit your workflow and preferences. Here's how:

Step 1: Access the Ribbon

To modify existing shortcuts, begin by accessing the Ribbon at the top of the Excel window.

Step 2: Select "Options"

From the Ribbon, click on the "File" tab and select "Options" from the left-hand menu.

Step 3: Customize the Ribbon

Within the Excel Options window, choose "Customize Ribbon" from the left-hand menu to access the keyboard shortcuts customization settings.

Step 4: Modify Shortcuts

From the Customize Ribbon settings, click on "Customize..." next to the "Keyboard shortcuts" label. Here, you can modify existing shortcuts or create new ones to better fit your needs.

In addition to modifying existing shortcuts, Excel also allows users to organize and manage shortcuts to align with personal preferences. Here's how to do it:

Step 1: Create a Custom Group

To organize and manage shortcuts, start by creating a custom group within the Ribbon to house the shortcuts you frequently use.

Step 2: Add Shortcuts to the Custom Group

Once the custom group is created, add the desired shortcuts to this group for easy access and organization.

Step 3: Rearrange Shortcuts

Excel allows users to rearrange shortcuts within the custom group, enabling you to prioritize the most frequently used shortcuts for quick access.

Step 4: Save and Apply Changes

After customizing and organizing your shortcuts, be sure to save and apply the changes to ensure they are reflected in your Excel workspace.

Advanced Shortcut Techniques

In this tutorial, we will explore advanced shortcut techniques in Excel that will help you navigate and work more efficiently within the program.

1. Moving between cells and sheets

Excel offers a variety of keyboard shortcuts to help you quickly move between cells and sheets. For example, pressing Ctrl + Arrow keys allows you to jump to the edge of the data region in a worksheet, while Ctrl + Page Up or Page Down lets you switch between sheets.

2. Accessing ribbon commands

Instead of using the mouse to access commands on the ribbon, you can use keyboard shortcuts. Simply press the Alt key to display the shortcut keys for commands on the ribbon, and then press the corresponding key to activate the command.

1. Using the "Quick Access Toolbar"

The Quick Access Toolbar at the top of the Excel window allows you to create custom shortcuts for functions or commands that you use frequently. Simply right-click the command or function, and then select "Add to Quick Access Toolbar" to create a custom shortcut.

2. Assigning keyboard shortcuts to macros

If you frequently use macros in Excel, you can assign keyboard shortcuts to them for easy access. Simply go to the "Developer" tab, click on "Macros," select the macro you want to assign a shortcut to, and then click "Options" to enter a shortcut key combination.

In conclusion, shortcuts in Excel are essential for improving efficiency and productivity in your work. By incorporating keyboard shortcuts and creating custom shortcuts, you can save time and simplify complex tasks in Excel. We encourage you to practice and incorporate shortcuts into your daily Excel usage to become more proficient in using this powerful tool.

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assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

Customize the Quick Access Toolbar

The customizable Quick Access Toolbar contains a set of commands that are independent of the currently displayed tab on the ribbon. You can move the Quick Access Toolbar from one of the two possible locations, and you can add buttons that represent commands to the Quick Access Toolbar. 

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You cannot increase the size of the buttons representing the commands by an option in Microsoft Office. The only way to increase the size of the buttons is to lower the screen resolution you use.

You cannot display the Quick Access Toolbar on multiple lines.

Only commands can be added to the Quick Access Toolbar. The contents of most lists, such as indent and spacing values and individual styles, which also appear on the ribbon, cannot be added to the Quick Access Toolbar. However, you can Customize the ribbon in Office to personalize the ribbon the way that you want it. For example, you can create custom tabs and custom groups to contain your frequently used commands.

What do you want to do?

Show or hide the quick access toolbar, move the quick access toolbar.

Show or hide command labels on the Quick Access Toolbar

Add a command to the Quick Access Toolbar

Add a command to the quick access toolbar that isn’t on the ribbon, remove a command from the quick access toolbar, change the order of the commands on the quick access toolbar, customize the quick access toolbar by using the options command.

Reset the Quick Access Toolbar to the default settings

Export a customized Quick Access Toolbar

Import a customized quick access toolbar.

When custom groups show a green or blue ball on the Quick Access Toolbar

Right-click in the ribbon and do either of the following:

Image of option to hide the Quick Access Toolbar

Note:  You can also hide the Quick Access Toolbar in the Customize Quick Access Toolbar menu by selecting Hide Quick Access Toolbar . 

The Quick Access Toolbar can be located in one of two places:

Image of Quick Access Toolbar icon above ribbon

Change the location

You can move the location of the Quick Access Toolbar from one location to another.

Select  Customize Quick Access Toolbar .

Quick Access Toolbar drop menu Show above the Toolbar

You can set the location commands in Options .

Select File > Options > Quick Access Toolbar>Toolbar Position.

Show or Hide command labels on the Quick Access Toolbar

If the Quick Access Toolbar is set below the ribbon, you can show or hide the command labels.  

Important:  The Quick Access Toolbar MUST be set below the ribbon to show or hide the command labels.

In the list, select either  Show Command Labels

Quick Access Toolbar drop-down menu select Show Command Labels

On the ribbon, select the appropriate tab or group to display the command that you want to add to the Quick Access Toolbar.

Image of drop-down to Customize Quick Access Toolbar to add commands

In the Choose commands from list, select  Commands Not in the Ribbon .

Find the command in the list, and then select  Add .

Tip:  If you can't find the command you want on the Commands Not in the Ribbon list, try setting Choose commands from to All commands .

Right-click the command you want to remove from the Quick Access Toolbar.

Select  Remove from Quick Access Toolbar on the shortcut menu.

Right-click the Quick Access Toolbar then select  Customize Quick Access Toolbar on the shortcut menu.

Under Customize Quick Access Toolbar , select the command you want to move.

Select the Move Up or Move Down arrow.

You can add, remove, and change the order of the commands on the Quick Access Toolbar by using the Options command.

Select  File > Options >  Quick Access Toolbar .

.

Notes:  To find an item in the Choose commands from list, it may be helpful to first confirm its location and name within the app. Commands that are no longer visible in the app could still be listed here under All commands . To help identify this type of command, a more descriptive tooltip name may appear in parentheses next to the legacy command name in this form: 

Address [Document Location] 

Formatting [Paste Formatting]

Formulas [Paste Formulas]

Values [Paste Values]

Open the Quick Access Toolbar short-cut menu, and then select  Customize Quick Access Toolbar .

Reset and Import Export fields in QAT File Options

You can export your ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar customizations into a file that can be imported and used by a coworker or on another computer.

Select  File > Options > Quick Access Toolbar .

Select  Import/Export >  Export all customizations .

For more information about how to customize the ribbon, see Customize the ribbon in Office .

You can import customization files to replace the current layout of the ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar. By being able to import the customization, you can keep Microsoft Office programs looking the same as your coworkers or from computer to computer.

Important:  When you import a ribbon customization file, you lose all prior ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar customizations. If you think that you might want to revert to the customization you currently have, you should export them before importing any new customizations.

Select File  >  Options >  Quick Access Toolbar .

Select  Import/Export >  Import customization file .

When custom groups show a green or blue ball on the Quick Access Toolbar

Icons represent custom groups of commands on the Quick Access Toolbar when an icon is chosen. If a custom group on the Quick Access Toolbar displays a green or blue ball for an icon, it means that an icon has not been selected for that custom group.   You can add an icon for a custom group after the group has already been created and displays on the Quick Access Toolbar.

In the Quick Access Toolbar drop-down, select More Commands .

In the left navigation bar, select Customize Ribbon .

In the Customize the Ribbon column on the right, select the custom group.

Select Rename .

Select an icon.

Select OK > OK .

Note:  To create a custom group of commands, refer to  Customize the ribbon in Office.  

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How To Create A Shortcut In Excel 2013

Key takeaway:.

  • Creating shortcuts in Excel 2013 can help save time and increase productivity. Shortcuts can be created for opening a specific workbook, for frequently used commands or functions, for specific cells or ranges, and for macros.
  • To create a shortcut for opening a specific workbook, right-click on the Excel icon in the taskbar, right-click on the name of the workbook, and select “Pin to Taskbar”.
  • To create a shortcut for a frequently used command or function, use the Quick Access Toolbar or assign a custom shortcut key to the command or function.
  • To create a shortcut for a specific cell or range of cells, use the Name Box to assign a name to the cell or range, and then use the name in a shortcut.
  • To assign shortcut keys to macros, use the Macro Options dialog box to assign a shortcut key to the macro.
  • Tips for effectively using Excel shortcuts include customizing and organizing the Quick Access Toolbar, using consistent naming conventions for shortcuts, and memorizing frequently used shortcuts.
  • Overall, creating and using shortcuts in Excel 2013 can greatly improve efficiency and save time in daily tasks.

Are you wasting your time manually entering data into Excel? Create a shortcut and save yourself time and effort! You can easily set up custom keyboard shortcuts in Excel 2013 to streamline your workflow.

Creating a shortcut for opening a specific workbook

To create a quick way to open a specific workbook in Excel 2013, follow these simple steps:

  • Locate the workbook you want to create a shortcut for.
  • Right-click on the workbook and select “Create shortcut.”
  • Drag the shortcut to the desired location, such as your desktop or a folder.

For added convenience, consider renaming the shortcut to something easily recognizable.

Pro Tip: Creating shortcuts can help streamline your workflow and save time, so don’t be afraid to create shortcuts for frequently used workbooks.

Creating a shortcut for a frequently used command or function

Creating Keyboard Shortcuts for Commonly Used Commands and Functions in Excel 2013

To increase efficiency in your Excel worksheet, you can create keyboard shortcuts for frequently used commands or functions. Here’s how:

  • Select the command or function that you want to create a shortcut for.
  • Right-click on the command or function and select “ Add to Quick Access Toolbar .”
  • Press “ Alt ” on your keyboard to display the shortcuts for the Quick Access Toolbar.
  • Press the corresponding key for the command or function you want to access.
  • To modify the shortcut key, right-click on the command or function in the Quick Access Toolbar, select “ Customize Quick Access Toolbar ,” and then “ Keyboard shortcuts .”
  • Enter the desired keyboard shortcut and select “ Assign .”

It’s important to note that some keyboard shortcuts may already be in use. In this case, Excel will warn you and offer alternative shortcuts. To avoid conflict, choose a different shortcut that is easy to remember and doesn’t interfere with other shortcuts commonly used in your workflow.

Pro Tip: To view a list of all your custom keyboard shortcuts, go to “ File ” > “ Options ” > “ Quick Access Toolbar ,” and then select “ Customize Ribbon ” and “ Keyboard Shortcuts .”

Creating a shortcut for a specific cell or range of cells

Creating a Quick Access Shortcut for Specific Cells or Range in Excel 2013

To create a Quick Access Shortcut for specific cells or range in Excel 2013, follow the given steps:

  • Select the cell or range of cells you want to create a Shortcut for.
  • Right-click on the cell or range and select “Add to Quick Access Toolbar”.
  • The selected cell or range of cells will be added as a Shortcut to the Quick Access Toolbar.
  • To use the Shortcut, click on it in the Quick Access Toolbar.

To avoid the hassle of searching for desired cells every time, create a Quick Access Shortcut. It’s a time-efficient way to improve productivity while working with extensive spreadsheets.

Try customizing your Quick Access Toolbar with frequently used shortcuts to save time and enhance your work speed. To do this, simply click on the “Customize Quick Access Toolbar” button present in the Toolbar.

Assigning shortcut keys to macros

In Excel 2013 , you can create a shortcut key for a macro to instantly execute it with just a few keystrokes. This saves time and adds convenience in performing repetitive tasks.

Here is a simple 4-Step Guide to assign shortcut keys to macros:

  • First, open the Excel file that contains the macro you want to give a shortcut key.
  • Then, go to the “Developer” tab , click on “Macros” and select the macro for which you want to create a shortcut key.
  • Next, click on the “Options” button and a new window will appear. In the “Shortcut Key” field, press the key you want to assign as the shortcut and click on “OK” .
  • Finally, select “OK” again to close the Macro window, and your shortcut key is ready to use.

It is essential to note that a shortcut key can consist of one letter, numerical digit, or a combination of both . Also, the key should not conflict with the existing Excel commands.

Additionally, ensure that you save the Excel file as a Macro-Enabled Workbook (.xlsm) format to preserve the macro and the assigned shortcut key.

To avoid errors, double-check the shortcut key before using it and remember that it only works in the Excel file where you assigned it.

These steps will help you assign a shortcut key to a macro with ease . Using this feature can significantly increase your productivity and simplify your work process.

Tips for effectively using Excel shortcuts

Discover Effective Ways to Employ Excel Shortcuts

Efficient utilization of Excel shortcuts can enhance productivity and accuracy in your work. Here we provide tips to help you effectively apply Excel shortcuts.

6 Steps to Effectively Employing Excel Shortcuts

  • Identify the most common tasks in your Excel workbook.
  • Use Excel’s in-built shortcuts for these common tasks.
  • Customize shortcuts if needed for frequently used tasks that don’t have built-in shortcuts.
  • Reduce time spent formatting by using shortcuts for + (addition), – (subtraction), * (multiplication), / (division).
  • Use “Ctrl + Shift + :” to enter the current date or time in a cell.
  • Optimize navigation with keyboard shortcuts for accessing the Ribbon, GoTo dialog box or formula bar.

Advanced Tips to Boost Your Excel Expertise

Improve your Excel speed and accuracy by avoiding mouse usage, and using Excel shortcuts for exploring and manipulating data. These tips are particularly helpful when working with large data sets.

A Real-Life Example of Excel Shortcut Applications

The use of Excel shortcuts in data entry and analysis saved a marketing team a considerable amount of time and effort. By quickly using shortcuts for aligning and formatting cells, they met deadlines with ease.

Five Facts About How To Create A Shortcut in Excel 2013:

  • ✅ You can create a keyboard shortcut for any Excel command or function. (Source: Microsoft)
  • ✅ You can create a shortcut to a specific worksheet or cell within a workbook. (Source: Excel Easy)
  • ✅ To create a shortcut, you need to know the command or function name and its corresponding keystroke combination. (Source: Excel Campus)
  • ✅ Shortcuts can save time and increase productivity in Excel. (Source: Lifewire)
  • ✅ Creating and using shortcuts is particularly useful for repetitive tasks in Excel. (Source: Business Insider)

FAQs about How To Create A Shortcut In Excel 2013

How do i create a simple shortcut in excel 2013.

To create a simple shortcut in Excel 2013, simply right-click on the file or folder you wish to create a shortcut for, then click “Create Shortcut.” This will create a new shortcut that you can rename as desired.

How do I create a shortcut key for a function or macro in Excel 2013?

To create a shortcut key for a function or macro in Excel 2013, navigate to the “File” tab and select “Options.” In the “Options” dialog box, select “Customize Ribbon” and then click the “Keyboard Shortcuts” button in the bottom right corner. From here, you can assign a key combination to any function or command in Excel.

How can I add a shortcut to the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel 2013?

To add a shortcut to the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel 2013, simply right-click on the command or function you wish to add and select “Add to Quick Access Toolbar.” This will place a shortcut to the command or function on the toolbar, making it easily accessible.

Is it possible to create a shortcut to a specific worksheet or cell in an Excel 2013 workbook?

Yes, it is possible to create a shortcut to a specific worksheet or cell in an Excel 2013 workbook. First, select the cell or worksheet that you wish to create a shortcut for. Next, right-click on the cell or worksheet and select “Hyperlink.” In the “Insert Hyperlink” dialog box, select “Place In This Document” and then select the worksheet or cell you wish to link to.

How do I create a shortcut to a specific workbook in Excel 2013?

To create a shortcut to a specific workbook in Excel 2013, right-click on the Excel icon in the Windows taskbar and select “Pin this program to taskbar.” Next, click and hold the Excel icon in the taskbar and select the workbook you wish to create a shortcut for from the list of recent workbooks. Drag the workbook to the desktop and release the mouse button to create a shortcut to the specific workbook.

Can I create a shortcut to a specific add-in in Excel 2013?

Yes, you can create a shortcut to a specific add-in in Excel 2013. First, navigate to the “File” tab and select “Options.” In the “Options” dialog box, select “Add-ins” and then click the “Manage” dropdown menu. From here, select “Excel Add-Ins” and then click “Go.” In the “Add-Ins” dialog box, select the add-in you wish to create a shortcut for and click “Copy to Folder.” Select the folder where you wish to place the shortcut and then click “OK.” This will create a shortcut to the add-in in the specified folder.

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

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quick access tool bar - email shortcut

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Iry Chen MSFT

  • Microsoft Agent |

Hi Ariel Leibowitz,

Since you posted your thread in Excel category, may I know if you mean you want to move email shortcut to Quick Access Toolbar is in Excel as below?

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

If yes, please check if you upgraded your Office for Mac to latest version via Check for Updates . If the issue persists after you upgraded to latest version, please check if you can add other tools to Quick Access Toolbar and use them.

If no, please provide us a screenshot about the email shortcut in the quick access toolbar you mentioned.

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Inactive profile

thanks for your response.

i have already had the latest update of 16.14.1 so i dont think it is the version.

here is the snap shot of my current quick access toolbar:

assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

I did try to add a diffrent shortcut whichas you can see is the border short cut and it worked with no problem. 

The email shortcut still is not working and i have remved and added back as well as restore to originial settings.

is it a possibility the accounts need to be linked? i doubt this myself as the same feautre in word worked with no problem. 

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Shortcut Keys and Quick Access Toolbar

Locked lesson.

  • Lesson resources Resources
  • Quick reference Reference

About this lesson

This is a guide to getting the quickest keyboard commands and buttons to work in your favor.

Exercise files

Download this lesson’s exercise file.

Quick reference

Shortcut keys and quick access toolbar (qat).

Savvy users will quickly learn to skip around Outlook using shortcut keys and custom QAT buttons.

When to use

You will use these features daily and quickly skip around the Outlook Navigation sections.

Instructions

To set up the Quick Access Toolbar:

  • Click the dropdown arrow on the right side of the QAT
  • Put a checkmark on each of the desired button options
  • As the last step, decide if you want the QAT below the ribbon, or leave it on the Title bar, above the ribbon.

You can add more buttons as you find them:

  • Right-click any button on any ribbon and select "Add to Quick Access Toolbar"

And likewise, you can remove buttons from the QAT:

  • Right-click any button on the QAT and select "Remove from the Quick Access Toolbar"

Hints & tips

Quickly switch between Inbox, Calendar, Contacts and Tasks:

  • Ctrl + 1 : Inbox
  • Ctrl + 2 : Calendar
  • Ctrl + 3 : Contacts
  • Ctrl + 4 : Tasks
  • 00:05 There is a great way to move around your Outlook interface and
  • 00:08 that's with some keyboard commands.
  • 00:11 Up here on the right-hand side, you can see I've got them listed, Ctrl+1 for
  • 00:15 inbox, Ctrl+2 for calendar, 3 for context, 4 for tasks.
  • 00:19 Let's go ahead and
  • 00:20 see that in action and keep an eye on this left-hand navigation pane.
  • 00:25 All right, I'm already on my inbox, so I'll hit Ctrl+2,
  • 00:29 there's my calendar, Ctrl+3, there's my contacts,
  • 00:33 Ctrl+4 for tasks, and Ctrl+1 puts me back at my inbox.
  • 00:39 Now another great way to learn tooltips is to simply float your mouse on any button,
  • 00:44 and you can see the tooltip comes up, and says Ctrl+N for new email.
  • 00:48 What about delete?
  • 00:49 When I float my mouse there, Ctrl+D for delete.
  • 00:53 How about reply?
  • 00:55 Ctrl+R.
  • 00:56 Now not all of the buttons have shortcut keys, but many of them do and
  • 00:59 then you can decide if you want to memorize them or not.
  • 01:03 All right, let's take you to the top of the screen to the Quick Access Toolbar,
  • 01:06 also known as a QAT.
  • 01:08 It resides right alongside the Outlook icon.
  • 01:12 Now, by default, I have a Send-Receive, or a Refresh, and then I have an Undo.
  • 01:16 Now, notice the dropdown arrow.
  • 01:18 When I click this,
  • 01:19 I can now put a checkmark on any of these items on the list.
  • 01:23 The list vanishes, I have to hit it again and put another checkmark.
  • 01:27 Now let me assure you, you only have to set this up one time.
  • 01:30 They won't go away, they'll remember that you set them up.
  • 01:33 So I'll go ahead and finish these.
  • 01:43 After you have them set up, you now have the option to show below the ribbon.
  • 01:51 A lot of people don't like this because it takes up yet
  • 01:53 another quarter inch of their screen and shrinks the area of their inbox.
  • 01:58 I happen to agree with that.
  • 02:00 In the case of Outlook, I prefer my QA team to be on top.
  • 02:03 So I'll hit that dropdown arrow, and I'll hit the show above the ribbon,
  • 02:07 but remember, it's your personal preference.
  • 02:11 There's another way to add and remove buttons on the QAT.
  • 02:14 So let's say I want this button,
  • 02:16 Send to OneNote to be on my QAT because I use it all the time.
  • 02:20 So I'll simply hit the right-click on the Send to OneNote, read the list,
  • 02:25 the option at the top says add to quick access.
  • 02:29 Notice it did pop up right here.
  • 02:32 Now it looks different on the ribbon, it's color purple, but
  • 02:35 on the QAT it's a white outline.
  • 02:36 And there's a way to remove buttons from your QAT.
  • 02:41 For instance, the touch mouse mode.
  • 02:44 I don't really want that on my QAT.
  • 02:46 It simply spreads apart the buttons or shrinks the buttons, but I never use it.
  • 02:52 So I'm just going to remove that button entirely.
  • 02:55 So I can hit the dropdown and uncheck it, or
  • 02:58 I could right-click on that button and remove from QAT.
  • 03:03 So as you can see,
  • 03:04 sometimes it's faster just to right-click than to hit the dropdown.
  • 03:08 Another way to find buttons or remove buttons is by the More Commands.
  • 03:12 So I'm going to hit the dropdown at the end of the QAT,
  • 03:15 click on the More Commands, and over on the right-hand side, I really don't want
  • 03:20 Find Contacts on my QAT, so I can click it once and hit Remove, and it's gone.
  • 03:26 Maybe there's a button over here on the left that you want to add.
  • 03:28 Go ahead and click the button and hit Add, and it'll pop over there.
  • 03:33 So I'll go ahead and click OK right now.
  • 03:36 Please practice that.
  • 03:37 It's a great way to set up and customize your user interface.
  • 03:41 And if you want to memorize, Ctrl+1, 2, 3, and 4.
  • 03:44 I highly recommend it.

Lesson notes are only available for subscribers.

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IMAGES

  1. Quick Access Toolbar in Outlook

    assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

  2. Guide to Quick Access Toolbar and Useful Shortcut Keys in Excel

    assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

  3. How to Create a ‘Quick Access’ Taskbar Shortcut in Windows 10. (aka

    assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

  4. Excel Quick Access Toolbar

    assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

  5. Excel Quick Access Toolbar (A Complete Guide + Tips)

    assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

  6. How to Create a ‘Quick Access’ Taskbar Shortcut in Windows 10. (aka

    assign shortcut key to quick access toolbar

VIDEO

  1. QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR IN MS WORD 2007

  2. Word VBA What is Macro in Hindi by AppliedK

  3. How to use shortcut key to Color text in Excel

  4. How to assign shortcut key in blender? Blender Tutorial

  5. Galaxy S23's: How to Set the Side Key Double Press to Open Up Your Favorite App

  6. Creating Keyboard Shortcuts To Launch Apps

COMMENTS

  1. Use a keyboard to customize the Quick Access Toolbar

    If the Quick Access Toolbar is above the ribbon, press the Up arrow key once to move the focus to the top of the screen. Press the Right arrow key until you reach the button ( Customize Quick Access Toolbar ). To expand the menu, press Alt+Down arrow key. Press M. The Quick Access Toolbar tab in the app options opens.

  2. Make Custom Excel Keyboard Shortcuts with Quick Access Toolbar

    The toolbar has keyboard shortcuts built in! Press ALT and they are revealed…. In my example above, ALT+1 saves the active workbook. ALT+4 brings up the Freeze Panes dialog. ALT-6 launches Solver. You can re-arrange the order of the shortcuts to put your favorites closer to the front. All that, and no Macros or VBA in sight!

  3. Quick Access Toolbar in Excel: how to customize, move and reset

    Open the Customize the Quick Access Toolbar dialog window. In the Choose commands from drop-down list on the left, pick Popular Commands. In the list of commands on the left, select <Separator> and click Add. Click the Move Up or Move Down arrow to position the separator where needed. Click OK to save the changes.

  4. Customize the Quick Access Toolbar

    In the Quick Access Toolbar drop-down, select More Commands. In the left navigation bar, select Customize Ribbon. In the Customize the Ribbon column on the right, select the custom group. Select Rename. Select an icon. Select OK > OK. Note: To create a custom group of commands, refer to Customize the ribbon in Office.

  5. Excel Quick Access Toolbar

    The keyboard shortcut to undo is Alt+2. There are two ways to use the keyboard shortcut. Press and release Alt to view the shortcut numbers next to each icon. Then press the number of the QAT item you want to use. Better Option: Press and hold Alt then press the number of the QAT item. This is much faster once you have your QAT shortcut numbers ...

  6. How to Customize the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel

    To start with, click on the drop-down icon and select More Commands. Immediately, this will open the Excel Options window where you can see the Quick Access Toolbar. Here, select a command from the commands list and click Add. Now, this will add the command to the command list on the right side. Finally, click OK.

  7. Excel Tips: Quick Access Toolbar Shortcuts

    Right-click the Sort A to Z option and select Add to Quick Access Toolbar . The command will now appear in the Quick Access Toolbar at the top of the screen. The shortcut is the Alt key, followed by a number. You can see which number is associated with each command by pressing the Alt key, as shown below. In our example, the Sort A-Z command is ...

  8. Excel Quick Access Toolbar • My Online Training Hub

    Quick Access Toolbar Keyboard Shortcuts. Adding an icon to the QAT is as easy as right-clicking on the icon > Add to Quick Access Toolbar: Alternatively, you can click on the drop down at the end of the QAT and choose from popular commands, or open the 'More Commands' dialog box as shown with the star in the list in the image below: The ...

  9. Quick access with keyboard shortcuts

    Quick Access Toolbar example. If your Quick Access Toolbar looks like the one above, the shortcuts will be: Example Quick Access Toolbar item. Example keyboard shortcut. Item 1: Automatically Save. Alt then 1. Item 2: New. Alt then 2. Item 3: Open.

  10. Excel Tutorial: How To Add Quick Access Toolbar In Excel

    Here's how you can do it: A. Open Excel and navigate to the toolbar. Launch Microsoft Excel and open a new or existing worksheet. Look for the quick access toolbar at the top left corner of the Excel window. B. Click on the drop-down arrow next to the quick access toolbar. Click on the drop-down arrow that is located on the right side of the ...

  11. Quick Access Toolbar shortcut keys

    The Quick Access Toolbar (QAT for short) is the toolbar that is located directly on the Title Bar at the top of your screen. You can make it either float above (standard) or under the Ribbon. The "Show below the Ribbon" option can be found by pressing the down arrow on the right of the QAT. It holds some defaults actions like; Send/Receive ...

  12. Excel Tutorial: How To Show Quick Access Toolbar In Excel

    Steps to assign keyboard shortcuts: Click on the arrow next to the Quick Access Toolbar. Select "More Commands" to open the Excel Options dialog box. Choose the command you want to assign a keyboard shortcut to from the "Choose commands from" drop-down menu. Select the command and click "Add" to add it to the Quick Access Toolbar.

  13. Easily access Quick Parts without going to Insert > Quick Parts

    You can also assign keyboard shortcuts to individual entries. Assigning Keyboard Shortcuts in Microsoft Word 2007-2021 (365) ... (Quick Access Toolbar) to easily select from a dropdown. The list for commands is long; you want to look for "Explore Quick Parts" to add to the QAT. I have this added in Outlook and Excel as well.

  14. Quick Access Toolbar SHORTCUTS

    Learn the Quick Access Toolbar Shortcuts to become more productive on Excel!📈 Get 25% off Felix using code KENJIFELIX: https://bit.ly/3tmfu6m 🆓 DOWNLOAD Fr...

  15. Excel Quick Tip: Quick Access Toolbar Shortcuts

    In this video, you'll learn more about using the shortcuts available on the Quick Access Toolbar in Excel. Visit https://www.gcflearnfree.org/excel-tips/quic...

  16. The Top 100 Excel Shortcuts You Need To Know

    For quick access, assign commonly used macros to a shortcut key combination or a button within the Quick Access Toolbar. Create custom Ribbon tabs and groups to organize your most-used functions, and then assign keyboard shortcuts for speedier access.

  17. Create A Custom Keyboard Shortcut To Quickly Insert A ...

    Click on "Customize Ribbon". Click on "Keyboard shortcuts: Customize" to open the "Customize Keyboard" dialog box. Select "Home Tab" from the "Categories" menu, and then select "Format Cell Borders" from the "Commands" menu. Assign the desired shortcut key (e.g., Ctrl + Shift + B) and click "OK.". Apart from the ...

  18. Excel Tutorial: How To Create Shortcut On Excel

    Step 2: Customize the Ribbon and Quick Access Toolbar. Click on the "Customize Ribbon" option on the left sidebar. Then, select "Macros" from the "Choose commands from" dropdown menu. Step 3: Select the Macro. Scroll through the list of available macros and select the one for which you want to assign a shortcut key. Step 4: Assign a Shortcut Key

  19. Customize the Quick Access Toolbar

    In the Quick Access Toolbar drop-down, select More Commands. In the left navigation bar, select Customize Ribbon. In the Customize the Ribbon column on the right, select the custom group. Select Rename. Select an icon. Select OK > OK. Note: To create a custom group of commands, refer to Customize the ribbon in Office.

  20. How To Create A Shortcut In Excel 2013

    To create a shortcut key for a function or macro in Excel 2013, navigate to the "File" tab and select "Options.". In the "Options" dialog box, select "Customize Ribbon" and then click the "Keyboard Shortcuts" button in the bottom right corner. From here, you can assign a key combination to any function or command in Excel.

  21. quick access tool bar

    quick access tool bar - email shortcut. I am trying to utilize the email shortcut in the quick access toolbar. I have gone to preferences to add this and it shows up on the toolbar. once i click on the icon, no actions occur and seem to just not be working at all. I have reset the preferences to the factory and added it back to see if anything ...

  22. Shortcut Keys and Quick Access Toolbar

    Download this lesson's exercise file. Shortcut-keys-and-quick-access-toolbar - Exercise File.docx. 57.8 KB. This is a guide to getting the quickest keyboard commands and buttons to work in your favor.