• Artificial Intelligence
  • Generative AI
  • Business Operations
  • Cloud Computing
  • Data Center
  • Data Management
  • Emerging Technology
  • Enterprise Applications
  • IT Leadership
  • Digital Transformation
  • IT Strategy
  • IT Management
  • Diversity and Inclusion
  • IT Operations
  • Project Management
  • Software Development
  • Vendors and Providers
  • United States
  • Middle East
  • Italia (Italy)
  • Netherlands
  • United Kingdom
  • New Zealand
  • Data Analytics & AI
  • Newsletters
  • Foundry Careers
  • Privacy Policy
  • Cookie Policy
  • Member Preferences
  • About AdChoices
  • Your California Privacy Rights

Our Network

  • Computerworld
  • Network World

Bob Violino

Career roadmap: Business intelligence analyst

Data is often described as the 'new oil'. But while most understand the importance of data, it is the business intelligence analysts who are able to extract the value from data. As business intelligence technologies continue to grow in popularity, here’s a look at what it takes to become a business intelligence analyst.

business intelligence data visualization tools analytics

Business and technology executives at organizations in every industry understand the importance of being able to gain value from data, by analyzing the information for trends and then using the insights gleaned to help enhance processes, increase sales, improve customer experience, or reap other benefits.

Business intelligence analysts are at the center of those efforts. And they will likely play an increasingly important role at enterprises as business intelligence (BI) technologies continue to grow in popularity.

Research firm Markets and Markets estimates that the global BI market will grow from $23.1 billion in 2020 to $33.3 billion by 2025, at a compound annual growth rate of 8 percent during the forecast period. A number of factors are helping to drive expansion of the market, including the growing focus on digital transformation, greater investments in analytics, increasing demand for dashboards for data visualization, rising adoption of cloud services, and increase in data generation.

From our editors straight to your inbox

The technology has particularly value during the COVID-19 pandemic, when many businesses are facing high-level challenges, the report says. The crisis has expedited the need for all companies to put their data to work to speed up the decision-making process, it says, and a comprehensive BI practice can help organizations define proper metrics to survive a crisis.

BI enables companies to take a closer look at how they’re operating by taking inventory of where they are doing well and where they can improve, the report says.

BI analysts leverage data analytics, visualization, and modeling tools and techniques to identify trends that can help business executives make more informed decisions. The role has become vital to any organization looking to gain the most value from their ever-increasing data volumes. These professionals can help find out where and how companies can reach new customers and markets and stem losses.

Discover Data Science, which provides online learning programs, has noted that BI analysts “are a necessary part of making the vast amount of data now available to companies useful. Business intelligence analysts straddle the worlds of business and [IT], having a firm grasp of each, and are able to mine and analyze data to recommend growth strategies for a company.”

BI analysts evaluate their organization’s data as well as that of competitors and the industry at large to discover ways to improve their own organizations’ market position, Discover Data Science says. That includes looking into systems, procedures, and functions to find areas in which to increase efficiency and profit margins.

These professionals also consider ways in which the organization can create new policies regarding data collection and analysis, including ensuring the integrity of data use. Among their regular responsibilities are meeting with business users to identify their needs; collecting data and extracting it from warehouses; analyzing data; creating summary reports; presenting recommendations to managers; overseeing the implementation of data analytics technologies; and developing new analytical models and techniques.

BI analysts need to possess a variety of business and technology skills, according to Discover Data Science. These include communication and presentation skills; leadership abilities and capability of working with team members on projects; problem-solving and critical thinking; ability to work within a diverse, global workforce; database design and data architecture; data mining and analytics; data security and privacy; data visualization; cloud computing; and data storage.

What does it take to become a business intelligence analyst? To find out, we spoke with Aaron Zuckerman, senior business intelligence analyst at ServiceSource, a provider of outsourced business services.

Zuckerman earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Yeshiva University in 2016, majoring in finance with a minor in information systems. Since then he has been working toward a Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) charter, now taking the second of three levels in the program.

CFA is a postgraduate professional certification offered by the CFA Institute to investment and financial professionals. It has the highest level of global legal and regulatory recognition of finance-related qualifications. The program covers a range of topics relating to statistics, probability theory, advanced investment analysis, security analysis, financial analysis, and other areas.

Job history

Immediately after graduating from college Zuckerman went to work as a business analyst at F3EA Holdings, a private equity firm that’s a subsidiary of 777 Partners. “Getting into technology was not on my trajectory,” he says. “My father runs a systems integrations firm in the [Washington] D.C. area, and I didn’t think it interested me.”

The firm was a holding company of businesses focused on consumer finance. Zuckerman was placed in the call center, putting together a Microsoft Excel reporting system that measured operational efficiency.

“After around 18 months, the company was looking to streamline their reporting stack, [and] our team started using SQL, Python, and SAS for manipulating and reporting our data,” Zuckerman says. “After another six months, we rolled out SAS VA, which is a visualization tool.” The team needed to implement visualizations tools in order to garner deeper insights into the data, he says.

Then six months after that, Zuckerman’s team was moved to the parent company and started building visualization tools for companies in the firm’s portfolio, with a focus on operations and investment management.

Although he didn’t gravitate toward technology early on, Zuckerman was intrigued about how different tools work together. “My father brought me along to see his projects and even asked me to help him with some of his jobs,” he says. “This really showed me how different technologies can work in unison within an integration tool.”

And the experience at the private equity firm reinforced the idea that technology can play a vital role in enhancing processes. “I watched the business go from being operationally inefficient to a well-oiled machine with an extensive automated reporting deck,” Zuckerman says. “I saw the ability technology can have and the ways software and systems can be used to better run businesses.”

In November 2019, Zuckerman left the firm to work as an analyst at FM Capital, a boutique real estate investment firm. He left that position after just six months, due in part to the coronavirus pandemic, and moved on to his current position at ServiceSource.

As a senior BI analyst at the company Zuckerman is working to convert a reporting technology stack from Excel to Power BI. Since he joined ServiceNow in June 2020 he has been focused on setting up reliable extract, transform, load (ETL), the procedure of copying data from one or more sources into a destination system that represents the data differently from the sources or in a different context.

“The issue is that because we are a third-party servicer, we are not the owners of the data, so there is some creativity that comes into play ensuring data quality,” Zuckerman says. “In my experiences, seeing the business from a before-and-after [scenario] made me realize how much this technology can help a business” in terms of bottom-line success.

Memorable moment

“Moving to the parent company at my first job,” Zuckerman says. “Our team had done such a great job streamlining and automating processes for the consumer finance businesses that the parent company tasked us to implement the same deck across their portfolios. It was gratifying to see the appreciation the parent company had for our work. Many times it’s hard for more corporate firms to invest in business intelligence, and I remember thinking how useful BI would be.”

Skills and certifications

At every stage of his career thus far Zuckerman has had to learn new skills. “I went from Excel reporting to SQL to emailing out of SAS to SAS VA to Power BI and Tableau,” he says. “While I haven’t needed any certifications to [be proficient] in these tools, I spent a lot of time ensuring I had a deep enough understanding to be considered a resource.”

Biggest inspirations

“I enjoy the use of concrete logic in the expression of thought,” Zuckerman says. “I think the two figures that shaped my views are [financial historian and economist] Peter Bernstein and [investor and business tycoon] Warren Buffet. Their use of statistics to shape opinion is something I admire, especially during times of misinformation.”

Best career advice received

“You never know where an opportunity will take you,” Zuckerman says. “There is a good deal of creativity that’s needed” to be an effective BI analyst. “In most cases, the data isn’t given to you on a silver platter, and there is some bending required to ensure accurate and effective reporting,” he says. “That’s where Python, SQL, R, and other languages come into play.”

Short-term and long-term goals

“Right now I am trying to automate reporting and working with the company we service to have greater access to the data,” Zuckerman says. “For the future, my goal is to become a wealth of knowledge that can translate into creatively and effectively implementing BI solutions across various business use cases. There is so much BI can accomplish, and I’m excited to be in this field now.”

Advice for others seeking a similar path

“Ask questions on how things work,” Zuckerman says. “By doing that, you’ll have a better understanding of the capabilities and limitations of different systems, and [it] will force you to use creativity to solve problems that arise. If you’re looking to get into this space, then start by asking questions on devices and apps you use. Technology is so prevalent in our lives that we can use our daily interactions as steppingstones to learning more about technological capabilities.”

In addition, and on a more granular level, Zuckerman recommends that aspiring business intelligence analysts learn SQL and Python. “They’re the backbone languages that most companies look for in candidates,” he says.

Related content

Cio announces the cio 100 uk and shares industry recognition awards in flagship evening celebrations, 12 ‘best practices’ it should avoid at all costs, qualcomm’s cisco sanchez on structuring it for business growth, gen ai success starts with an effective pilot strategy.

Bob Violino

Bob Violino is a freelance writer who covers a variety of technology and business topics.

More from this author

Empowering citizen developers for real business impact, making intelligent automation work at scale, digital platform conductors help manage hybrid networks, most popular authors.

business intelligence career roadmap

  • Paula Rooney Senior Writer

Show me more

A fluency in business and tech yields success at nato.

Image

The demand for new skills: How can CIOs optimize their team?

Image

The CIO event of the year: What to expect at CIO100 ASEAN Awards

Image

Teradyne CIO Shannon Gath on GenAI explorations

Image

CIO Leadership Live Canada with Jassi Kaur, Head of IT and Security, Bulk Barn Foods Limited

Image

CIO Leadership Live with Mark Schwartz, Enterprise Strategist, AWS, Author

Image

Sponsored Links

  • There's a new hybrid cloud agenda. HPE has the playbook for success. Learn more here.
  • Connect With CIOs & IT Executives At Gartner IT Symposium/ Xpo™ 2023
  • Tech leaders are grappling with infrastructure needs to accommodate AI--Get the Report
  • dtSearch® - INSTANTLY SEARCH TERABYTES of files, emails, databases, web data. 25+ search types; Win/Lin/Mac SDK; hundreds of reviews; full evaluations
  • Lenovo Late Night I.T. Emmy-nominated host Baratunde Thurston is back at it for Season 2, hanging out after hours with tech titans for an unfiltered, no-BS chat.
  • Harness edge services to build agile hybrid infrastructure—Learn More
  • EcoStruxure™ IT redefines hybrid IT infrastructure management

Business Intelligence Careers

portrait of Christina Payne

www.bestcolleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

Turn Your Dreams Into Reality

Take our quiz and we'll do the homework for you! Compare your school matches and apply to your top choice today.

Business intelligence professionals manage data analysis and other critical information to provide a holistic view of business operations. These careers require technical acumen to deliver data-driven business analytics that help companies fix problems and implement more efficient processes.

Potential careers for a business intelligence major include analyst, specialist, consultant, and project manager. Professionals in this field can work in the private or public sectors.

Our guide outlines more information about careers in business intelligence, including job projections and career advancement opportunities. We also highlight common courses and useful publications available in this field.

Why Pursue a Career in Business Intelligence?

Individuals who pursue careers with a business intelligence degree are typically analytical thinkers with a talent for numbers and data collection. These professionals usually work in an office environment and use computers to collect, store, and analyze data to determine the effectiveness of a business.

A career in business intelligence requires an individual to be self-motivated and possess excellent communication skills, as they must report their findings to those with less expertise in this field.

Many companies use business intelligence to reduce costs or find new customers. Business intelligence professionals might work on their own or as part of a team. Some professionals may even advance to managerial positions.

Business Intelligence Career Outlook

Salaries and job outlook data for business intelligence careers vary depending on the location of the job and the level of experience or education of the employee. Readers can find job-specific statistics from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

For example, the BLS reported that cost estimators earned a median salary of $65,250 in 2019, and this field has a projected growth of 9% from 2018-2028. Meanwhile, market research analysts earned a median salary of $63,790 in 2019, and the projected growth for this position is 20%.

The table below shows median annual salary values for common careers for a business intelligence major based on work experience.

Source: PayScale

Skills Gained With a Business Intelligence Degree

Business intelligence degrees impart a broad set of skills, preparing graduates to thrive in myriad professional settings. Aside from the competencies built through coursework, degree-seekers can hone their knowledge through internships, by joining student clubs and organizations, and by seeking relevant certification programs. Graduates develop many important skills while moving through their programs, including those listed below.

  • Collapse All

Business intelligence professionals use their analytical skills to sift through large amounts of data, interpret information, and make recommendations about how to proceed. They must know how to analyze many different types of data to work effectively.

Written and Oral Communication

Individuals in these roles must communicate with stakeholders about complicated and often nuanced information. Therefore, they should know how to write and speak effectively to ensure they do not lose details in translation, which could compromise their reports.

Attention to Detail

As they review large amounts of information, business intelligence professionals must identify details to help answer questions. They should possess a keen eye for relevant information and know how to stay focused during long hours of analysis and research.

Problem-Solving

Companies hire analysts to find solutions to issues such as funding shortages, managerial problems, and technology needs. These individuals must take the information provided and draw conclusions to help the company move past its problem and continue growing in a profitable manner.

Time Management

Analysts may work on an hourly basis, so clients expect them to use their time wisely. The most effective business intelligence professionals know how to stay focused and attuned to their research questions, allowing them to deliver final projects in a timely manner.

Business Intelligence Career Paths

Because the business intelligence field covers such a wide array of disciplines and industries, it is common to find programs that prepare you for specific career paths. For example, some students may feel drawn to working in financial intelligence, while others want to work in the technology or marketing worlds. Whatever your interest, make sure you take the time to find a school that caters to your needs. The paths highlighted below give a glimpse of what's available, but this list is far from exhaustive.

Data Management

These individuals work more on the technical side of businesses. Coursework delves into areas like data analytics, information mining, and outcome mapping. Learners also cover topics related to analytical reasoning, common database servers, and data-based decision-making.

With so much data available, healthcare organizations look for ways to properly organize, secure, and leverage this information. This career path considers how using healthcare analytics can improve patient outcomes. Coursework typically emphasizes healthcare operations, analytics models, security and ethics, and regulatory considerations.

Students pursuing this line of work learn to help companies run smoothly. They mostly focus on operations for manufacturing and/or service professions, with specific studies in regulatory considerations, managing supply chains, negotiating contracts, and improving financial outcomes.

International Business

This career path specializes in organizational models, cross-cultural communication, global ethics, and how different types of organizations (e.g., governmental, corporate, and nonprofit) function across the world.

How to Start Your Career in Business Intelligence

Most business intelligence careers require a degree from a postsecondary institution. Market research analysts, financial analysts, and management analysts all need a bachelor's degree to gain an entry-level position. Earning a four-year degree gives graduates the necessary skills and knowledge they need to thrive in the workplace.

Some professionals may earn a master's or doctoral degree, even if the job does not explicitly require one. Advanced degrees look good on resumes and can help candidates stand out in a competitive job market. Professionals can also use a master's or Ph.D. to advance their careers, such as moving from an analyst position into a managerial role.

Bachelor's Degree in Business Intelligence

Bachelor's degrees represent the most common path into a business intelligence career. The curricula of these programs include general education topics, foundational discipline coursework, and several specialization areas. Analyst and consulting roles typically require this degree, as it provides a solid foundation for entry-level jobs or potential graduate study.

Most bachelor's programs require approximately 120 credits and take four years of full-time study to complete. BestColleges provides a guide on business intelligence degree programs at this level to help you with your search.

What Can You Do With a Bachelor's in Business Intelligence?

Management analyst.

Working with managers, management analysts look for ways to improve efficiency and effectiveness through leadership. After observing an organization and staff, these professionals make recommendations on how to improve outcomes, such as increased income and reduced costs.

Salary : $85,260

Budget Analyst

Budget analysts help organizations improve their financial situations. They review historical financial data, observe problems, and create solutions to improve organizational spending and revenue creation. They also develop and monitor budgets to make recommendations.

Salary : $76,540

Financial Analyst

Financial analysts work with public and private businesses and individuals to help them make sound financial investments. They recommend specific investments based on unique organizational/individual factors, monitor economic trends, and create reports with regular updates.

Salary : $85,660

Market Research Analyst

Whether working in-house or as consultants, market research analysts help companies understand current and future market trends and how these might affect the sale of a product or service. They create market forecasts, review existing marketing plans, learn more about prospective clients, and create actionable and accessible data reports.

Salary : $63,790

Operations Research Analyst

These professionals work in industries such as business, healthcare, and logistics to help organizations create more streamlined operations procedures. They gather input from employees, review operations and sales data, and speak with customers about their experiences before collating data into an actionable plan.

Salary : $84,810

Source: BLS

Master's Degree in Business Intelligence

Individuals seeking roles with more nuanced skill sets often pursue a master's degree. Master's programs in business intelligence usually require two years of full-time study, and many offer specializations. They build on knowledge gained at the bachelor's level and move from foundational studies to advanced learning. Graduates often go on to more senior-level management roles or advanced analyst positions.

If you want to learn additional information about programs at this level, review BestColleges' guides on master's in business intelligence degree programs and top online master's in business intelligence programs.

What Can You Do With a Master's in Business Intelligence?

Economists examine how goods, resources, and services are produced, distributed, and consumed among specific audiences. They collect and analyze this data alongside overarching economic trends and historical data to find ways of improving current trends.

Salary : $105,020

Statistician

Business intelligence professionals who find themselves drawn to the data and analytics portion of their job may enjoy work as statisticians. These individuals use their advanced knowledge of data analysis and statistical modeling to understand and solve problems in business, healthcare, and other industries.

Salary : $92,030

Survey Researcher

These professionals design surveys to collect information about particular topics, such as those related to job satisfaction or opinion/perception. They collate these answers and present them to clients.

Salary : $59,170

Financial Manager

Financial managers ensure a company's overall financial health. They create budgets, monitor spending, produce revenue reports, develop financial projections and reports, stay attuned to market trends, and work with high-level managers to inform the decision-making process. A master's degree is not always required for this position, but it can help candidates stand out.

Salary : $129,890

Political Scientist

Political scientists use their business intelligence skills to better understand how political systems interact with free economies. They study how shifts in power affect businesses and the roles these trends -- and government in general -- play in business arenas.

Salary : $122,220

Doctorate Degree in Business Intelligence

A doctorate is the most advanced degree available in business intelligence. Program graduates can work in the upper echelons of the field as decision-makers, thought leaders, educators, and cutting-edge researchers -- all of whom help shape the discipline's future.

Most teaching and research positions require a doctorate; individuals aspiring to these roles should keep that in mind as they work their way through school. Most doctoral programs take 3-5 years of full-time study, although this depends on how much time students spend researching and writing their dissertations and completing other graduation requirements. Degree-seekers interested in pursuing a doctoral program should review the jobs below to understand whether this qualification serves their needs.

What Can You Do With a Doctorate in Business Intelligence?

Business professor.

These individuals work within colleges and universities to educate the next generation of business intelligence leaders. They prepare lectures, assign projects and exams, advise students on courses, write recommendation letters, and present at academic conferences.

Salary : $87,200

Business intelligence researchers study historic and current data. They look for new ways to analyze data and mine information that might help in these settings. These professionals write reports about their findings and publish them in trade journals or present them at professional conferences.

Salary : $79,720

Top Executive

Also known as C-level employees, these top-tier professionals lead organizations. They provide guidance to other senior staff, offer strategic planning, meet with industry stakeholders, and -- in some cases -- report to a board of directors.

Salary : $104,690

Sources: BLS and PayScale

How to Advance Your Career in Business Intelligence

One of the best ways professionals can advance their career is by returning to school and earning another degree. However, those with careers in business intelligence can also find other methods of career advancement, such as by pursuing certification, continuing education, and/or networking through professional organizations. These methods typically cost less and take less time than earning another degree.

The following sections discuss a few alternative methods of career advancement. Readers should keep in mind that not all jobs set the same hurdles for advancement. Professionals should research their specific careers or talk to their employers to discover how best to increase their prospects of advancement.

Certifications and/or Licensure

Certification can provide a means for professional advancement. Certifications can offer additional training and skills and keep professionals up-to-date about the technologies and standards of their industry. Some workers in this field -- such as entrepreneurs looking to start their own business intelligence company -- may also need a license.

Professionals should always research potential certification options and ensure they meet the standards for employment in their industry and state of residence.

Financial analysts should consider earning a chartered financial analyst (CFA) certification from the CFA Institute, while management analysts should pursue certified management consultant certification from the Institute of Management Consultants. Additionally, market research analysts can find certification through the Insights Association's professional researcher certification .

Continuing Education

Continuing education options include earning a second degree. Some professionals choose to return to college for a master's or a doctorate. Graduate degrees teach advanced and specialized skills, preparing professionals for career advancement after graduation. However, these programs can be expensive and may take several years to complete.

Professionals who want to pursue continuing education without committing to a full degree can take advantage of certificate programs or enroll in massive open online courses (MOOCs). Professional organizations or postsecondary institutions may also offer fellowships at no or minimal cost to the participants.

Certificate programs, special workshops or training, and online courses often require payment from participants. Readers should reach out to their employers to determine if their workplace will cover any professional development expenses.

Professionals in careers that require a business intelligence degree can find many ways to keep their skills sharp and develop new knowledge in their field. Beyond certification and continuing education opportunities, readers should consider other options for professional development.

Networking helps professionals connect with their peers, exchange ideas, and forge relationships that may help with career advancement. Many professional organizations offer networking opportunities for members through conferences and online forums.

Most fields feature an industry-specific professional organization. Readers should investigate options such as the Institute for Certification of Computing Professionals and the Digital Analytics Association .

How to Switch Your Career to Business Intelligence

People in business-related or data-driven fields can easily transition to business intelligence. Professionals switching to careers in business intelligence may not need to return to college and earn another degree.

Most business intelligence careers require a bachelor's degree, but many will accept degrees in any business-related field. For example, management analysts might hold a degree in business, finance, marketing, or economics.

While professionals might not need a new degree, they may want to consider earning a certification for their new position or taking some courses in their new field. This provides transitioning workers a better understanding of the skills they need for their new job.

Where Can You Work as a Business Intelligence Professional?

As this guide demonstrates, careers for business intelligence degree graduates can be found in many fields, from business and healthcare to technology and finance. Learners who are still unsure of their target career path can review the common industries below to get a sense of the possibilities.

Management of Companies and Enterprises

Individuals in these industries serve as C-level professionals who make important decisions about finances, market placement, operations, and budgeting.

Securities, Commodity Contracts, and Other Financial Investments and Related Activities

Financial analysts, managers, and other finance professionals advise clients on making good decisions with their money.

Management Consulting

A great fit for individuals who want to work with many different clients, these professionals sharpen their managerial skills and teach leaders to better serve their employees and clients.

Computer Systems Design and Related Services

Tech-minded individuals often gravitate toward this industry, which allows them to analyze systems and network needs before making recommendations on improvements.

Local, State, and Federal Government

Government offices at all levels require the expertise of business intelligence professionals to guide questions on spending, revenue, benefits, and employee retention.

Interview With a Professional in Business Intelligence

Portrait of Justin MacLean

Justin MacLean

Justin MacLean -- an independent consultant working in the field of analytics for business -- boasts a background in programming, selling, strategy, and product management.

Justin spent his early career with Oracle, designing and building solutions in enterprise resource planning. He has since worked across sectors, industries, and functions, always with a focus on understanding data and using it to address business problems. He founded InkSpace Analytics in 2018 to produce outcomes with analytics.

Why did you decide to pursue a career in business intelligence? Was it something you were always interested in?

I've been interested in computers since I was a kid and discovered business intelligence shortly after joining the professional workforce as a consultant working in logistics. I was attracted to the space because it provides a wonderful opportunity to apply technology to real business problems. I was also looking for work that allows for the daily opportunity to learn about new functions, industries, and technologies.

What do you find to be the most exciting aspect of working in business intelligence?

For me, what's exciting is the ability of business intelligence to guide decisions in real businesses. To me, this is the central objective of the space, and it's not as easy as it looks. Very often, the business objective gets lost as we build the latest "cool" thing, and we wind up with a solution in search of a problem. What's exciting is identifying a problem, then creating a well-matched solution.

How do you stay up to date with changes in the industry?

First, I do a lot of reading to keep up on information. I find books are great for teaching large concepts and involved or detailed topics. Blogs and newsletters are everywhere online and can be good sources for quick updates on news in the industry. I'm also a big fan of podcasts, which seem to be growing in number and quality.

Second, I put quite a bit of effort into skills development. There is a great deal of free or inexpensive education available online that I make use of. These services are really good for introducing yourself to a new tool, programming language, or business concept. Likewise, many examples of the tools used in business intelligence are open-source, or at least have free trials available, and you can't beat a hands-on experiment to get a handle on something.

Why did you decide to move into independent consulting? Is this a common career path for individuals in the field?

Yes, it's fairly common, and seems to be following the trend toward the gig economy. Of course, there are also many opportunities doing business intelligence work inside organizations, as well. I have always wanted to start my own business, so the independent route was a good fit for me. It's not as stable as a full-time job would be, but I get to be my own boss.

What advice would you give to those considering a career in business intelligence?

Make sure that the types of problems we solve in business intelligence are ones that interest you. The best business intelligence professionals are interested in business first. We use technology as a tool to get jobs done. For example, if you would like to spend time helping a leader understand why one sales territory is doing better than all the others, or how one product's profitability compares to others, then a career in business intelligence may be right for you.

There are also a few concepts that I find relevant to almost every task in business intelligence and would definitely recommend understanding.

First, you must understand relational databases. These are the beating heart of virtually every business software application and data warehouse. Once you understand the thinking behind these, you'll have a start toward building insights for your customers. Second, SQL is the ubiquitous language for asking questions and extracting answers from relational databases, so learning it is critical. Third, in your career in business intelligence you will encounter many different applications, database technologies, and software products. Don't get attached to any of them. There will always be a new tool to learn, a new concept to master, a new possibility to consider.

Get good at learning new things. Your career will have longevity, and you can be valuable to businesses for as long as you want to be!

Resources for Business Intelligence Majors

Business intelligence professionals can find many resources for development and continuing education. The sections below offer a brief list of professional organizations that can help your career in business intelligence; examples of free, open courseware; and a description of several professional publications related to the industry.

Professional Organizations

Association for Financial Professionals : AFP provides training, certifications, an annual conference, regional roundtables, career development, discussion boards, a podcast, career coaches, resume services, and online profile development.

American Association of Finance and Accounting : Founded in 1978, AAFA supports executives in these industries by providing job postings, local affiliates in more than 40 American cities, career advancement opportunities, and a regularly updated blog.

International Institute of Business Analysis : Members of IIBA can take advantage of business analysis membership services, numerous certifications, global thought leadership, local chapters, an annual conference, a career center, business analysis competency models, best practices, and a knowledge center.

Institute of Management Consultants : For over 50 years, IMCUSA has served management professionals by providing local and national events, continuing education opportunities, career support, certification, mentorship opportunities, seminars and webinars, networking opportunities with more than 10,000 members, and online chat rooms.

The Society of Professional Consultants : The SPC helps individual consultants grow and scale their businesses by providing opportunities for networking, mentoring programs, continuing education, monthly meet-ups in Boston, nationwide events, and consultant directories.

Open Courseware

Analyzing and Visualizing Data : With Power BI - Davidson College: This course teaches students to use Power BI -- a business analytics tool created by Microsoft. The program lasts four weeks and focuses on working with and visualizing data. Students learn to import and prepare data, identify types and trends within data, and prepare reports by synthesizing information.

Database Management Essentials : University of Colorado: Students learn to create databases, satisfy business reporting requests, and analyze table designs and databases for redundancies. Online learners can complete this course in about 42 hours. The program teaches students to use Oracle, MySQL, and ER Assistant to create and manage their databases.

Data Warehouse Concepts, Design, and Data Integration - University of Colorado : This course teaches students how to manage large sets of data in a data warehouse environment. The program uses Microstrategy's online analytical processing and visualization capacities. Students can complete the course in about 23 hours. Online learners focus on building business reporting and analytical processing skills.

Business Intelligence: Concepts, Tools, and Applications - University of Colorado : This program takes about 25 hours for students to complete. The course shows students how business intelligence technology and data gathering can affect the decision-making process across industries.

Publications

Business Intelligence Journal : Created by Transforming Data with Intelligence (TDWI), this quarterly publication focuses on business intelligence tools and data warehousing solutions. The data-driven journal helps data management and analytics professionals across industries. Only TDWI members may access the publication. Professionals may become a member on TDWI's website.

Analytics Magazine : This publication covers new trends and technologies in the world of business intelligence. Created by the Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences, the magazine offers information about analytics, reviews of software, and in-depth dives into topics like the evolution of pricing. Professionals may subscribe to the magazine online.

Successful Business Intelligence by Cindi Howson : Written by a business intelligence analyst, this book uses real-world examples to illustrate how business intelligence can shape industries. Readers learn about the best strategies employed by successful companies. The book also explains how to craft winning strategies to meet diverse needs and goals in business.

Business Intelligence Guidebook by Rick Sherman : This book explores business intelligence theory and teaches readers how to apply those theories in the real world. The author offers practical solutions for common business intelligence problems and includes a companion website with more references.

Big Data in Practice by Bernard Marr : This book offers real-world examples of business intelligence in action. The author explores big-name companies and how they successfully implement different business intelligence strategies. The book delves into the problems that companies seek to overcome with business intelligence and the challenges that might impede progress.

Business Intelligence Roadmap by Larissa T. Moss and Shaku Atr : This book lays out the strategies for implementing business intelligence procedures in a step-by-step progression for professionals at the start of their careers. The book walks readers through every stage, from concept to deployment of business intelligence strategies. It also includes references and helpful tools.

Frequently Asked Questions About Business Intelligence Careers

Is business intelligence a good major.

Earning a business intelligence degree can lead to many careers in data analytics and consulting in the private and public sectors. Students can even use this major to enter other business-related career paths, such as marketing, finance, or management. Business intelligence majors develop important critical thinking and data analysis skills.

What is the average salary for a business intelligence degree?

The salaries for business intelligence careers vary depending on factors like location, job title, and level of experience. However, the BLS found that market research analysts earned a median annual salary of $63,790 in 2019, while management analysts earned $85,260. Readers can access BLS data for specific jobs online.

What you can do with a business intelligence degree?

A business intelligence degree allows graduates to pursue many different business-related careers. Some students might choose to work as market research analysts or financial analysts, while others might go into consulting or management. Business intelligence teaches vital skills in critical thinking and data analysis, which translate across jobs and industries.

How do you start a career in business intelligence?

Most careers in business intelligence require a bachelor's degree. Readers interested in business intelligence should research business intelligence bachelor's programs. However, a bachelor's degree in business, economics, finance, or a related field can provide enough training and knowledge for graduates to enter the field of business intelligence.

Read More About Business Intelligence on BestColleges

Explore more college resources, business administration careers.

portrait of Thomas Broderick

Public Relations Careers

portrait of Staff Writers

Behavioral Psychology Careers

BestColleges.com is an advertising-supported site. Featured or trusted partner programs and all school search, finder, or match results are for schools that compensate us. This compensation does not influence our school rankings, resource guides, or other editorially-independent information published on this site.

Compare Your School Options

View the most relevant schools for your interests and compare them by tuition, programs, acceptance rate, and other factors important to finding your college home.

Business Intelligence Career Path: How to Land a Business Intelligence Job in 2022

Business Intelligence Career Path: How to Land a BI Job in 2022

Business intelligence is one of the fastest-growing job sectors in the United States. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, hiring for business intelligence analysts is expected to grow by 14% over the next decade.

Business intelligence careers generally have three tracks: Analytics, Engineer, or Architecture . Business intelligence analysts evaluate business data and generate insights to help businesses reduce costs, maximize profits or gain a competitive edge. Business intelligence engineers, architects and developers design and construct the infrastructure to store and process data.

To launch a business intelligence career, you will likely need a minimum of:

  • A bachelor’s degree in computer science, analytics or a related field.
  • 4 years of professional experience (often in a related role like data or marketing analyst).
  • Advanced skills in SQL, database design, Tableau, analytics and statistics.

This business intelligence career guide provides an overview of the field, an introduction to different BI job titles, and offers tips for breaking into business intelligence careers. You can also start by practicing these business intelligence interview questions .

What Is Business Intelligence?

Business Intelligence is a combination of analytics, data mining and data visualization. The chief function of BI is to translate data into insights that facilitate data-driven decision making.

Here is how explanation by a current practitioner about the huge impact BI professionals have on their organizations:

“Business intelligence (also called BI) refers to the technology that allows businesses to organize, analyze, and contextualize business data from around the company,” says Ben Johnson, a Business Intelligence Analyst at Access Bank. “BI makes a difference by introducing options to summarize insights, making business operations smarter, providing visibility to facts concealed under complex data, and providing a competitive edge to business everywhere.”

Modern business intelligence systems utilize a mix of tools and processes, including:

  • Data mining - Analysis of large datasets using statistics and machine learning.
  • Dashboarding - Using dashboards to share visualizations and analysis with stakeholders for faster decision making.
  • KPIs and benchmarking - This is a key function of BI: Comparing current data to historical data to benchmark performance.
  • Descriptive analytics - Answering questions using analytics data like: What happened? When did it happen? Who performed what? How many?
  • ETL development - Building data infrastructure to process and prepare large volumes of data for analysis.

What Do Business Intelligence Professionals Do?

Within business intelligence there are developers and engineers who build BI and analytics infrastructure, and the analysts who evaluate the data, meet with stakeholders and generate reports that inform business decisions. Some of the most common job functions include:

  • Meeting with stakeholders to determine BI needs.
  • Collaborating cross-functionally to obtain feedback.
  • Collecting and extracting data from warehouses for reporting.
  • In depth data analysis, using SQL and analytics solutions.
  • Presenting reports and visualizations to key stakeholders.
  • Developing analytics models and techniques that meet the company’s needs.

Solving a Business Intelligence Problem

Let’s say an e-commerce business is experiencing high abandoned cart rates. To solve this business intelligence problem, the BI department would first meet with stakeholders to determine the types of data they would need to scope out the issue at hand.

In this case, customer experience analytics could help identify where in the sales funnel customers abandoned their cart, which types of customers are abandoning and potentially why they are abandoning. After meeting with stakeholders, a business intelligence engineer would design and build databases and dashboards to process the raw customer analytics data.

Then, a business intelligence analyst would analyze the aggregated data assembled by the engineer and identify where customers were dropping off in the sales funnel, which types of customers, etc. Reporting this information back to the product and development teams, the analyst can help improve customer experiences to reduce abandonment rates and drive new revenue.

Business Intelligence Careers: Job Titles

Almost all business intelligence professionals start in analyst roles, before working their way up the career ladder. The most common roles in business intelligence include:

Business Intelligence Analyst - BI analysts typically deal with processed data. They perform statistical analysis to generate reports and isolate insights about the business. They typically focus on marketing, operations or finance for the business.

Customer Insight Analyst - This role is common in larger companies (like Amazon), and is an analytics role focused solely on customer experiences. Customer insight analysts typically serve customer experience and marketing departments to help them gain a better understanding of their core customers and answer questions about how to best serve the customer’s needs.

Business Intelligence Engineer - Similar to the data engineer role, BI engineers build dashboards, databases and ETL pipelines to process raw analytics data. They are also responsible for using visualization tools like Tableau to implement dashboards for stakeholders.

Business Intelligence Developer - BI developers have a similar role to engineers, but developers typically work more closely on front-end solutions, helping to develop dashboards, software and applications to present business data.

Business Intelligence Architect - In large organizations, BI architects are responsible for designing a roadmap for development. Architects are not necessarily responsible for building or implementing the solutions; rather, they are responsible for translating the needs of an organization into a plan for the developers and engineers to build.

Business Intelligence Manager - Business intelligence managers oversee a team of analysts and developers/engineers, and they are responsible for driving the performance of the BI department. Managers collaborate cross-functionally with leadership teams, building and interacting with stakeholders to shape the roadmap for BI development and analysis.

Business Intelligence Analyst vs. Engineer

In simple terms, business intelligence, or BI, is the practice of applying insights from data to the problem of running an enterprise business. This field is split between two common careers (BI analysts and BI engineers).

While there is some overlap between the two roles, a BI engineer mainly constructs and maintains the data pipeline that a BI analyst uses to deliver insights to their employer. Therefore, BI engineers have a more technical role than BI analyst and require specialization in data storage and ETL tools.

What Does a Business Intelligence Analyst Do?

The core responsibility of a business intelligence analyst is to gather, clean and analyze business data. This can include data like revenue, sales, or customer engagement metrics. In particular, BI analysts are required to:

  • Interpret data - Analysts are tasked with identifying patterns and anomalies that signal an area for improvement. A BI analyst, for example, might analyze customer engagement data to determine optimization techniques for a sales funnel.
  • Share findings - BI analysts regularly present their work to stakeholders, product teams and leadership. Analysts may be required to build visualizations or present reports to make their insights more accessible.
  • Make recommendations - Based on their analyses, BI analysts also make recommendations to help the business become more efficient or to grow.

What Does a Business Intelligence Engineer Do?

Business intelligence engineers and developers core responsibility is building and maintaining the BI data environment. They may create pipelines to process daily transaction data or develop custom BI reporting tools. Responsibilities of a business intelligence engineer include:

  • Data architecture - BI engineers develop the frameworks for storing and processing data, including databases, data warehouses, and pipelines.
  • BI development - Engineers design, implement and maintain BI tools that facilitate analysis, including reports and dashboards.
  • Customizing BI platforms - Engineers may also be tasked with adding new capabilities to existing BI platforms, or developing new BI tools and platforms for the company.

What Skills Do You Need for Business Intelligence Careers?

No matter the role, careers in business intelligence require a strong background in business, economics, statistics, or a related field. BI professionals also require strong technical skills, as well as the ability to communicate their insights to people who may not be familiar with data science.

Required business intelligence skills include:

Non-Technical Skills

  • Exceptional verbal and written communication/presentation skills to share technical insights and recommendations with colleagues in an easy to understand manner.
  • Project management and leadership skills, as well as the ability to work effectively in a team.
  • Problem solving skills and critical thinking.
  • Ability to operate in a workforce targeted at consumer satisfaction. Many roles, especially BI analysts, will be called in to work with external partners and clients.

Technical Skills

  • Expert knowledge of SQL
  • Knowledge of Python
  • Cloud computing and data storage technology such as Google’s Big Query and Amazon’s Redshift
  • Database design and data architecture
  • Data security and privacy
  • Data mining and visualization including Tableau, Microsoft Power BI, or QuickSight
  • Business intelligence tools like Hyperion, MicroStrategy, or Cognos

Education Requirements for a BI Career

A bachelor’s degree is a minimum requirement to land a BI job. However, most BI jobs are not entry-level and require 4 years of professional experience on average.

With that professional experience component in mind, it is important to choose a major that provides skills that are well-aligned to BI careers and that will help you land an entry-level role like data analyst. The best subjects to study for BI careers include:

  • Statistics or applied math
  • Computer science
  • Engineering (Computer / electrical / industrial)
  • Business (with a technology-related minor)

Do You Need a Master’s Degree?

Beyond a bachelor’s degree, you will likely need supplemental training for the role. In fact, a master’s degree is an increasingly common ‘preferred’ qualification for business intelligence jobs. There are two ways you can gain additional training:

Professional certifications - Certificate programs in SQL, data analytics, visualization tools like Tableau, QuickSight and Python will make you more competitive for BI roles. Bootcamps can also help you level up your skills in a short amount of time.

Master’s degree - A master’s degree in statistics, data analytics, data science, or a related quantitative field are preferred for many BI roles. MBAs are another option, but would require additional training in BI technology. Typically, a master’s degree is helpful for those making career transitions or those who want a deeper understanding of data science.

Landing Your First Business Intelligence Job

As we have discussed, a BI analyst is not an entry-level role. This is because employers prefer analysts who have solid experience in data and business analysis. Having an MBA or data science master’s can substitute for a portion of real-world experience, however you should still expect to be asked for 1-2 years in the field in addition to the degree.

Since most BI roles require 4 or more years of professional experience, many BI analysts, engineers and developers start their careers as data analysts, business analysts, or in entry-level data engineering jobs.

These roles provide a strong foundation in skills like SQL, data analytics and database design, which are all must-have foundations for BI roles. Similarly, these roles provide an introduction to tools like Tableau, AWS Glue and Hadoop.

Building Business Intelligence Skills

Other than working for a company there are many ways for you to build business intelligence skills. You can:

video

  • Work on business intelligence projects using existing datasets
  • Master SQL and data analytics
  • Consider a certification, bootcamp or a master’s degree

Preparing for Business Intelligence Interviews

Ultimately, no matter your mix of experience and outside learning, you have to do well in the interview. Business intelligence interviews focus heavily on SQL, as well as analytics and SQL case studies, product/business sense, and statistics. For example, the Amazon business intelligence engineer interview includes 4-5 rounds that focus on:

  • Statistics and SQL technical interview with a Business Intelligence Engineer. This interview assesses your SQL and basic statistics knowledge. It also has some behavioral elements to it.
  • Behavioral plus SQL interview with some case-based questions around leadership principles.
  • Case Study Interview and behavioral interview with a hiring manager.
  • Behavioral Interview with a focus on leadership principles.
  • Statistics and Product-Sense interview with a data scientist. This interview round assesses your basic knowledge of data science concepts and metric definition.

Business case studies are a key part of BI interviews, and it helps to practice with as many mock interviews as possible. Here is one such example, a walk-through of a business intelligence mock interview :

Duplicate Product

Moving Up to Senior-Level BI Roles

A senior level BI analyst role typically requires at least eight years of experience in business intelligence, analytics, product management/development or technology. In addition, for senior-level roles an MBA or master’s degree in data science, business analytics, or statistics is often required. Besides both experience and a higher education, some employers also require Certified Business Analysis Professional certification through the International Institute of Business Analysis.

Here is a complete list of requirements for a senior level BI role:

  • A working knowledge of data mining principles, predictive analytics, mapping, collecting data from multiple data systems on premises and cloud-based data sources.
  • Strong SQL skills, ability to perform effective querying involving multiple tables and subqueries.
  • Understanding of, and experience using, analytical concepts and statistical techniques. These include: hypothesis development, designing tests/experiments, analyzing data, drawing conclusions and developing actionable recommendations for business units.
  • Strong programming skills with querying languages: SQL, SAS, etc.
  • Experience with data visualization tools: Tableau, Power BI, Metabase, chart.js, etc.
  • Strong ability to manage numerous processes and projects simultaneously.
  • Experience working with and creating databases and dashboards using all relevant data to inform decisions.

Landing a Business Intelligence Manager Role

Business intelligence manager roles typically require an MBA or master’s degree in business analytics. Similarly, these roles require 10-12 years of BI or related experience, and employers may also request some form of BI certification.

BI managers generally work closely with leaders across operations, product, business development and other related departments to support and implement tools that facilitate more agile data-driven decision making. The key role of a BI manager is to lead the BI team - including analysts, engineers and developers. Managers play an integral role in conceptualizing, building, maintaining and generating insights from the organization’s BI tools.

Some requirements include:

  • Experience in planning and coordinating the development, design and implementation of organizational analytics systems.
  • Experience managing data warehouse and reporting infrastructure to help scale reporting needs while still maintaining a high-performance environment for reporting.
  • Understanding of reporting and business intelligence best practices.
  • In-depth knowledge and understanding of data governance best practice.
  • Experience in people management and/or project management.
  • Experience building and maintaining an enterprise data warehouse.
  • Strong communication and collaboration skills.

Launch Your Business Intelligence Career

Interview Query offers a variety of resources to help you prepare for business intelligence interviews. Start with our guide to Business Intelligence Interview Questions , or become a premium member to access:

  • 500+ Real Data Science Interview Questions
  • Data Science Interview Course (with modules in Product Sense , Analytics/SQL , and Statistics )
  • Practice Take-Home Exercises
  • Data Science Skills Tests
  • Online Degree Explore Bachelor’s & Master’s degrees
  • MasterTrack™ Earn credit towards a Master’s degree
  • University Certificates Advance your career with graduate-level learning
  • Top Courses
  • Join for Free

What Is a Business Analyst? 2023 Career Guide

Business analysts help maximize a business's effectiveness through data-driven decisions. Learn about what business analysts do and what it takes to become one.

[Featured image] A business analyst stands in an office hallway holding a laptop computer as they prepare for a meeting.

Leer en español. (Read in Spanish.)

Business analysts use data to form business insights and recommend changes in businesses and other organizations. Business analysts can identify issues in virtually any part of an organization, including IT processes, organizational structures, or staff development.

As businesses seek to increase efficiency and reduce costs, business analytics has become an important component of their operations. Let’s take a closer look at what business analysts do and what it takes to get a job in business analysis. 

What does a business analyst do?

Business analysts identify business areas that can be improved to increase efficiency and strengthen business processes. They often work closely with others throughout the business hierarchy to communicate their findings and help implement changes.

Tasks and duties can include:

Identifying and prioritizing the organization's functional and technical needs and requirements

Using SQL and Excel to analyze large data sets

Compiling charts, tables, and other elements of data visualization 

Creating financial models to support business decisions

Understanding business strategies, goals, and requirements

Planning enterprise architecture (the structure of a business)

Forecasting, budgeting, and performing both variance analysis and financial analysis

What's the difference between a business analyst and a data analyst?

Both data analysts and business analysts support data-driven decisions in their companies. Business analysts tend to focus more on recommending solutions for business needs, while data analysts work more closely with the data itself.

Read more: Data Analyst vs. Business Analyst: What’s the Difference?

Why pursue a career in business analysis?

As a business analyst, you'll have the opportunity to support your organization's success through data-driven insights. It's a career where every day brings new challenges and new ways to put your skills into practice. If you enjoy helping people, asking questions, solving problems, and working independently, a career as a business analyst could be a good fit.

Business analyst salary

The average salary for business analysts in December 2021 in the United States is $77,218, according to Glassdoor [ 1 ]. Your exact salary will vary depending on the company, location, and amount of experience you have.

Job outlook

The demand for business analysts has increased in recent years and is projected to continue. The US Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects job growth between 2020 and 2030 for similar roles to range from seven percent (computer systems analysts) to 25 percent (operations research analysts) [ 2 , 3 ]. Other related job titles include management analyst and operations analyst—both of which perform duties similar to business analysts.

How to become a business analyst

Becoming a business analyst may require gaining skills and credentials applicable to the work and the industry you're interested in. Coursework, certifications, or degrees can each aid your path to a job as a business analyst.

1. Sharpen your business analyst skills.

Here are some skills you’ll typically want to have as a business analyst. 

Business acumen: A solid understanding of finance, accounting, and business principles will help you surface what operational issues exist, and how best to address them.

Communication: A business analyst is often expected to communicate with several different players within an organization, including upper management and other teams. Being able to present your ideas clearly and convincingly—both verbally and in writing—will be a large asset as a business analyst.

Data analysis : Gathering, tracking, and analyzing performance metrics will be central to a business analysis role. Having a good grasp of data analysis and visualization tools like Tableau, Excel, and BI Tools can be useful. Some knowledge of a programming language like SQL may also come in handy.

Business analysis methodologies: Depending on your industry, it could help to be familiar with specific methodologies, like Agile Business Analysis, Six Sigma, or Rational Unified Process.

Industry expertise: Different industries have different business needs and challenges. Developing business solutions for an IT company might look different than it does for a health care company. Industry experience, even in another role, can give you a competitive edge when applying for jobs.

2. Take a course.

Refreshing your familiarity with the skills expected of a business analyst can show employers your knowledge is up to date and adequate. Coursework, either in person or online, can give you the tools needed to get your foot in the door in the field of business analytics.

Gain a holistic understanding of the job with courses in data analytics or business analytics . Or familiarize yourself with the tools used in business analytics through coursework in Tableau or Excel and MySQL .

3. Earn a business analyst certification.

Earning a certification can expand your skill set, and potentially increase your earnings or make you more competitive for jobs. Here are some business analysis certifications to consider:

IIBA Entry Certificate in Business Analysis (ECBA)

IIBA Certified Business Analysis Professional (CBAP)

IIBA Certification of Capability in Business Analysis (CCBA)

PMI Professional in Business Analytics (PMI-PBA)

If you’re just starting out as a business analyst, the ECBA can show hiring managers you’ve received several hours of training and know the basics of business analysis. If you have some experience with business analytics, the CBAP, CCBA, and PMI-PBA can show employers your competency and experience.

4. Consider a degree.

Many employers like to see at least a bachelor’s degree on your resume, though some may prefer candidates with a master’s degree.

Bachelor’s degrees: Bachelor’s degrees are common for entry-level positions in analytical fields, according to the BLS. Getting your bachelor's degree in a quantitative field like economics, finance, computer science, data science, statistics, information management, or a similar field can prepare you for business analysis jobs.

Master’s degrees and MBAs: Some employers might prefer candidates with a master’s degree in a relevant subject. You may also consider getting a Master of Business Administration (MBA) ; several programs offer specializations in business analytics. Getting your master's degree in business analytics or business administration could help advance your skills and knowledge, and give you a competitive advantage in the job search arena.

5. Start with an entry-level role.

Internships and entry-level positions in accounting, finance, or business settings can build your experience before you advance to a higher-level position. In your job search, look for titles like junior business analyst or entry-level business analyst. If you’re still in school, making an appointment with a career counselor can help you understand what opportunities are out there.

If a career in business analysis sounds interesting, start by exploring how you can bolster your skill set. Courses in business analytics or business systems can give you a broad introduction to the profession.

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

Is business analyst an it job ‎.

Not all business analysts work for a company's IT department. If you're interested in both data analysis and IT, consider a role as an IT business analyst. In this job, you'd analyze the needs and pain points of the IT department, and recommend technology and business solutions. ‎

Should I become a data analyst or a business analyst? ‎

Business analytics might be a better fit if you're more business minded. If you enjoy working with numbers and excel in mathematics and statistics, then consider data analysis as a career path. Many of the skills overlap, so it's possible to start as a business analyst and move into a role as a data analyst (or vice versa). ‎

What is a business intelligence analyst? ‎

A business intelligence analyst , or BI analyst, is a hybrid role somewhere between data analyst and business analyst. BI analysts analyze, model, and visualize data on industry trends and the competitive landscape to help businesses drive profits. ‎

Article sources

Glassdoor. " Business Analyst Salaries , https://www.glassdoor.com/Salaries/business-analyst-salary-SRCH_KO0,16.htm." Accessed December 10, 2021.

US Bureau of Labor Statistics. " Computer Systems Analysts , https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm." Accessed December 10, 2021.

US Bureau of Labor Statistics. " Operations Research Analysts , https://www.bls.gov/ooh/math/operations-research-analysts.htm." Accessed December 10, 2021.

This content has been made available for informational purposes only. Learners are advised to conduct additional research to ensure that courses and other credentials pursued meet their personal, professional, and financial goals.

RUB 1 unlocks unlimited opportunities

  • For a limited time, get your first month of Coursera Plus for RUB 1 .
  • Get unlimited access to 7,000+ courses from world-class universities and companies like Google, Microsoft, and Yale.
  • Build the skills you need to succeed, anytime you need them—whether you’re starting your first job, switching to a new career, or advancing in your current role.

Trending now

Top 90+ tableau interview questions and answers, top 18 business analytics tools used by companies today, business analytics in 2021: a comprehensive trends report, business analytics applications and notable use cases, how to use excel if function: a comprehensive guide, how to become a data scientist, top 30 excel formulas and functions you should know, 50 excel shortcuts key that you should know in 2023, learn how to build your own netflix-like movie recommendation engine, how to use vlookup in excel a step-by-step guide, business intelligence career guide: your complete guide to becoming a business analyst.

ebook

  • Overview and market study for BI enthusiasts
  • Top skills and job roles, and major companies hiring BI pros
  • Salary potential and career growth in BI

About the Career Guide

Over the last few years, technology has evolved rapidly, enabling faster processes and bringing in large volumes of data. And organizations are opening their doors to Business intelligence (BI) that leverages software and services to transform data into actionable insights and help them make informed and tactical business decisions.

The new-age Business Intelligence tools and solutions present analytical findings in reports, dashboards, graphs, and maps to provide users with detailed intelligence about the state of the business. In today’s customer-centric, digital-first world, many companies are bombarded with ‘information overload’ and urgently seek greater control, understanding, and intelligence from their organization’s data. The best solution: adopting Business Intelligence roadmap and strategy and making it an integral part of your operation. Opportunities in the field of Business intelligence are limitless, with plenty of possibilities and high-paying salaries.

The Business Intelligence Roadmap Career Guide is your complete guide to the skills required, career opportunities available and the ideal BI roadmap learning path needed to propel a career in the thriving and lucrative field. The business intelligence roadmap guide also provides the most trending technologies, the BI roadmap and career path to becoming a business analyst, and the top companies hiring business analysts. On the other hand, if you wish to strengthen your chances of landing your dream job, you should consider enrolling in our top programs, including:

1. Post Graduate Program In Business Analysis

Become an ai-powered business analyst.

Become an AI-powered Business Analyst

2. Master of Business Administration with IU, Germany

Learn essential skills for effective leadership.

Learn Essential Skills for Effective Leadership

Don't wait any longer! Take advantage of this BI roadmap, download our Business Intelligence Roadmap Career Guide and take the first step towards a successful career today!

About the Author

Nikita Duggal

Nikita Duggal is a passionate digital marketer with a major in English language and literature, a word connoisseur who loves writing about raging technologies, digital marketing, and career conundrums.

Recommended Programs

Post Graduate Program in Business Analysis

Business Analyst

*Lifetime access to high-quality, self-paced e-learning content.

Recommended Resources

The Complete Business Intelligence Tool Guide for the Modern Analyst

The Complete Business Intelligence Tool Guide for the Modern Analyst

6 In-Demand Business Analyst Career Paths and Pitfalls to Avoid

6 In-Demand Business Analyst Career Paths and Pitfalls to Avoid

Business Analytics Basics: A Beginner’s Guide

Business Analytics Basics: A Beginner’s Guide

How to Become a Business Analyst

How to Become a Business Analyst

Data Analyst Resume Guide

Data Analyst Resume Guide

Business Analyst vs Data Analyst: Differences and Career Paths Explained

Business Analyst vs Data Analyst: Differences and Career Paths Explained

  • PMP, PMI, PMBOK, CAPM, PgMP, PfMP, ACP, PBA, RMP, SP, and OPM3 are registered marks of the Project Management Institute, Inc.

CK Logo

  • Best Coding Bootcamps
  • Best Online Bootcamps
  • Best Web Design Bootcamps
  • Best Data Science Bootcamps
  • Best Technology Sales Bootcamps
  • Best Data Analytics Bootcamps
  • Best Cybersecurity Bootcamps
  • Best Digital Marketing Bootcamps
  • App Academy vs Fullstack Academy
  • BrainStation vs Hack Reactor
  • Hack Reactor vs Thinkful
  • App Academy vs Coding Dojo
  • Galvanize vs Hack Reactor
  • CareerFoundry vs Springboard
  • Devmountain vs Hack Reactor
  • App Academy vs Codesmith
  • Flatiron School vs General Assembly
  • Flatiron School vs Thinkful
  • Los Angeles
  • San Francisco
  • Web Development
  • Machine Learning
  • Bootcamps 101
  • Data Science
  • Software Engineering
  • Full-Stack Development
  • Career Changes
  • Mobile App Development
  • Cybersecurity
  • Product Management
  • Digital Marketing
  • UX/UI Design
  • What is a Coding Bootcamp?
  • Are Coding Bootcamps Worth It?
  • How to Choose a Coding Bootcamp
  • Best Online Coding Bootcamps and Courses
  • Best Free Bootcamps and Coding Training
  • Coding Bootcamp vs. Community College
  • Coding Bootcamp vs. Self-Learning
  • Bootcamps vs. Certifications: Compared
  • What Is a Coding Bootcamp Job Guarantee?
  • How to Pay for Coding Bootcamp
  • Ultimate Guide to Coding Bootcamp Loans
  • Best Coding Bootcamp Scholarships and Grants
  • Education Stipends for Coding Bootcamps
  • Get Your Coding Bootcamp Sponsored by Your Employer
  • GI Bill and Coding Bootcamps
  • Tech Interviews
  • Career Advice
  • Publication
  • Reskill America
  • Partner with us
  • Our Enterprise Solution
  • Connect with Us

How to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst

Data is becoming increasingly more relevant and necessary for different industries. One of the important new data science fields is business intelligence analytics . Business intelligence analysts extract value from data and use this information to help improve business operations.

Business intelligence analysts, also known as BI analysts, play an important role in the tech industry and will continue to have an increasing demand in the future. To learn how to become a business intelligence analyst, including job requirements, skills, educational paths, and salary, keep reading our comprehensive guide.

What Is a Business Intelligence Analyst?

A business intelligence analyst is a data science professional who uses data to help businesses make accurate decisions. This can help them improve their business operations and become more efficient. This role is ideal for anyone interested in data analysis and business growth.

Business intelligence analysts are also known as BI analysts. They use data analytics, data visualization, and data modeling techniques to make data-driven decisions. BI analysts work with other professionals including engineers, managers, and executives to accomplish their goals.

Business Intelligence Analyst Job Description

The job of a BI analyst is to manage data retrieval and data analysis for a business. They help businesses leverage data, identify opportunities for improvement, spot business trends, and recognize potential issues. Business intelligence analysts offer solutions and ways to improve.

It is the job of a BI analyst to ensure that the business is following trends, improving efficiency, increasing productivity, and making profits. They collect data and use it to decide the best path for the company to take in the future. They communicate with business executives, management, and the IT department to determine the company’s needs.

Business Intelligence Analyst Salary and Job Outlook

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median annual salary of management analysts is $87,660. With the right education, skills, and experience, there are various fields for a BI analyst to work in. These include healthcare, finance, education, law enforcement, and technology. 

The field has huge potential, and the BLS also reports that employment is projected to grow by 14 percent between 2020 and 2030. This is higher than average for other careers. This is due to the increase in demand for professionals in the field as most companies are seeking a more accurate way to increase their efficiency.

Top Reasons to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst in 2021

Like most careers in tech, becoming a business intelligence analyst is a good choice because it has a high potential for growth and lucrative salaries. As a professional BI analyst, you can find a job in a variety of fields. Read below to learn about more benefits of being a BI analyst.

  • Job Opportunities. One of the top reasons to start a career as a business intelligence analyst is the opportunity to work in almost any field. There is a demand for BI analysts in numerous areas, as most businesses need professionals to help them make informed business decisions and increase profits.
  • High Salary. The median salary for BI analysts is $87,660, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This is high compared to other occupations.
  • Secure Future. As the need for BI analysts is growing, industries are beginning to employ more BI professionals. This need will only increase in years to come.
  • Career Growth.  A business intelligence analyst can work in different roles not limited to business analytics. They can work as data engineers, data warehouse architects , and business intelligence managers.

Business Intelligence Analyst Job Requirements

To find employment as a business analyst, you need to meet certain requirements. Some of these include earning a degree, certifications, job experience, data skills, and communication skills. While all of these don’t guarantee landing a job, they increase your chances with potential employers.

  • Education. The most important requirement to get a job as a business analyst is to earn a degree. Most business analysts pursue an advanced degree like a master’s degree. However, many entry-level roles only require a bachelor’s degree . You can also try to get a bootcamp education.
  • Job Experience. Most employers prefer to hire individuals with at least three years of experience. Recent graduates can apply for internship roles to gain the required experience.
  • Analytical Skills. These experts must have analytical skills because they are the foundation of the job. A good BI analyst should be able to inspect and interpret data with ease. 
  • Communication Skills. Business analysts have strong written and verbal communication skills as they will need to work with other teams through projects.

Types of Business Intelligence Analyst Careers

One of the best parts of being a business intelligence analyst is the career opportunities. There are various job roles for professionals in the field. You can work as a data architect, data scientist, data engineer, business intelligence manager, business intelligence architect, or data analyst.

  • Data Analyst

A data analyst works to collect, analyze, interpret, and store data to help businesses and organizations make better decisions. They ensure the quality and accuracy of data to make beneficial decisions for organizations. A BI analyst is just a type of data analyst, so you can enter this broader field first.

Business Intelligence Manager

A business intelligence manager oversees a team of analysts and developers. This manager and their team gather information, assess company needs, and report industry trends to management. The skills necessary to become a business intelligence analyst include data analysis and team management.

  • Machine Learning Engineer

Machine learning engineers are in charge of developing self-running AI software to automate predictive models for recommended searches, virtual assistants, translation apps, chatbots, and driverless cars. Machine learning is a growing topic in the data science field, so it is a good skill to have even if it’s not your career of choice. 

Business Intelligence Analyst Meaning: What Does a Business Intelligence Analyst Do?

The daily duties and responsibilities of business analysts differ based on the industry they are working in. They are mainly responsible for improving the processes and structures of a company. These experts also perform research and analysis to find solutions to business issues and improve business operations.

Gathers Business Intelligence Data

A business intelligence analyst has to collect data from internal and external sources like industry reports or public information. They will use this information to stay updated on industry trends and make informed business decisions to increase the productivity of the company. BI analysts have to gather high-quality data.

Analyzes Collected Data

After collecting useful data, BI analysts then analyze the data to get adequate information that can be used to make decisions for the business. This analysis is the most important part of a business intelligence analyst’s role because it combines their data science skills and business knowledge.

Utilizes Data to Make Decisions

After performing adequate analysis, business analysts use the information generated to make well-informed decisions that can increase the efficiency, productivity, and profit of the business. This will help it keep up with the competition and maximize its profits.

Essential Business Intelligence Analyst Skills

To excel as a business intelligence analyst, there are certain skills that you need to thrive. These skills demonstrate to the employer that you are a good fit for the role and give you a competitive edge in the job market. Read below to read more about essential BI analyst skills.

Data Analysis Skills

BI analysts should have excellent data analysis skills as the majority of their job involves collecting, analyzing, and measuring data. This includes technical tools and programming languages. As a business intelligence analyst, you should learn SQL and other tools depending on your job.

Business Skills

A good business analyst should have skills in writing and verbal communication, critical thinking, problem-solving, teamwork, and leadership. These are essential because business analysts work with members of different teams and have to create reports detailing their decisions.

Programming Skills

Business intelligence analysts should have good programming skills in languages like R, SQL, Python, and Java. They need these skills to be able to perform their tasks, including designing web applications, creating automated databases, and analyzing product sales performances.

How Long Does It Take to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst?

On average, it takes about four years to become a business intelligence analyst. You will need to get an education and relevant job experience to land an entry-level job. However, it may take longer depending on the chosen educational path. If you choose to get a degree, you would spend about four years in college. Coding bootcamps can take a few months to complete.

Can a Coding Bootcamp Help Me Become a Business Intelligence Analyst?

Yes, a coding bootcamp can help you become a business intelligence analyst. You can try one of the best data analytics bootcamps to learn the tech skills you need for the job. These bootcamps cover the technical and academic aspects of training as they prepare students to land jobs after graduation.

Coding bootcamps also equip their students with career skills to ensure that they are fit for real-world jobs by offering career services. These services include interview prep, resume writing skills, and personal branding. Bootcamps typically last only a few months, which makes them faster and more affordable than degree programs.

Can I Become A Business Intelligence Analyst From Home?

Yes, you can become a business intelligence analyst from home if you enroll in an online coding bootcamp or take online courses. While you may need to get further education after taking an online class, it is possible to learn all the necessary skills to start a career in business intelligence. 

How to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst: A Step-by-Step Guide

You can start a career as a business intelligence analyst by following these steps. While it is not mandatory to follow them, it is recommended as it will make your journey into the field easier. Every career journey is different, but you can become a BI analyst more quickly and easily if you meet these milestones.

Step 1: Earn a Degree

The first step to start a career as a business intelligence analyst is to earn a degree. You can pursue a bachelor’s degree in any of the relevant fields for business intelligence analysts. These include computer science, data science, business, and finance.

Step 2: Gain Job Experience

Most potential employers give preference to candidates with job experience. It is recommended that you gain some real-world experience before going for your dream job. To do this, you can apply for internships with companies that interest you.

Step 3: Get Professional Certifications

Getting a certification in the industry will boost your chances of landing better jobs. Employers place value on professional certifications because they validate your skills. These certifications can be earned anytime before applying for business intelligence analyst positions as they provide a competitive advantage.

Step 4: Get an Advanced Degree

After joining the field and starting your career, you can apply for advanced degrees. These degrees help to emphasize your skills as a professional and show employers that you are capable of performing your job effectively.

Best Schools and Education for a Business Intelligence Analyst Career

There are different educational paths for anyone looking to start a career as a business intelligence analyst. You can choose to earn a degree, enroll in a coding bootcamp, attend a vocational school, or join a community college. 

Business Intelligence Analyst Bootcamps

BI analyst bootcamps are designed to train students with the skills necessary to start a career and land a job soon after graduation. They typically last for three months to nine months, depending on the school you choose, and are more affordable than colleges. Some BI analyst bootcamps include Thinkful , Le Wagon, General Assembly, and Springboard.

Bootcamps offer various formats of learning, including online, in-person, full-time, part-time, and hands-on learning. Some bootcamps have all of these options available, while others only have a few. Coding bootcamps also offer career services, job guarantees, and job assistance to their students to ensure that they get jobs after completion of the program.

Vocational School

Vocational schools are also known as career schools, and they provide practical training for students to start a job or task in a specific field. It is best for people who are looking to start a new career, transition to a new career, or enhance their skills. 

Vocational schools only provide education for specific careers and do not offer unrelated academic courses, unlike the traditional education system. They also offer training for professionals who are already in a field to help enhance their skills. Vocational schools typically last for ten weeks to two years, depending on the course and other factors.

Community College

Community colleges offer two-year academic, technical, and vocational programs to students. Students who complete community colleges can transfer to colleges to earn bachelor’s degrees. They are more affordable and can help lower college costs. They also have a more flexible admission process.

Community colleges have smaller class sizes, and most of them do not require SAT scores. Students of community colleges can work while schooling, and the courses offered are more flexible to allow students to have lives outside the school. It allows part-time and full-time classes, depending on the schedule of the student.

Business Intelligence Analyst Degrees

To earn a degree as a business intelligence analyst, students will have to apply for programs in computer science, mathematics, economics, business, finance, and other related fields. The most common degree among business intelligence analysts is the bachelor’s degree. However, you can earn a master’s degree afterward to increase your chances in the job market.

Degrees are more expensive than any other option on this list, but they are still useful. They can be a good choice if you’re not yet sure about your specialization. For example, you can get a Bachelor’s Degree in Computer Science and decide to become a BI analyst later on.

The Most Important Business Intelligence Analyst Certifications

Certifications are necessary for career growth. They help to improve your skills and act as evidence to employers that you have the relevant knowledge needed to work efficiently. There are many certifications available to choose from, but some are more valued than others. Below are some of the most important business intelligence analyst certifications in the industry.

Certified Business Intelligence Professional (CBIP)

This certification is awarded to senior-level professionals in the information and technology industry, with a focus on data management and business analytics. It shows that you are up to date on the latest BI trends, practices, and solutions. To earn this certification, you will need to have two years of full-time experience in the field.

Certified Analytics Professional (CAP)

This certification shows your skills in using data analysis to make informed business decisions. To earn this certification, you need to have a master’s degree and a minimum job experience of five years. Candidates without a master’s degree should have a bachelor’s degree and at least seven years of experience in data or analytics.

PMI Professional in Business Analysis (PBA)

This certification focuses on hands-on projects and tests experts on business analysis principles, tools, and essentials. This credential requires a bachelor's degree and three years of work experience. You can earn this certification after passing an exam from the Project Management Institute.

How to Prepare for Your Business Intelligence Analyst Job Interview

To prepare for a business analytics job interview, you need to have the necessary job requirements and skills. The job interviews typically cover key knowledge and technical and soft skills that a business intelligence analyst should have. Below are some interview practice questions to get you started.

Business Intelligence Analyst Job Interview Practice Questions

  • How would you define the role of a business intelligence analyst?
  • What is your educational background, and what fields do you have experience in?
  • Which programming languages are you familiar with?
  • Which BI tools have you used?
  • How do you see data gathering and analysis evolving in the next few years?

Should I Become a Business Intelligence Analyst in 2021?

Yes, you should become a business intelligence analyst in 2021. Business intelligence analysis is a good career to pursue, and it offers many job roles and opportunities. These professionals are in demand in various industries and tend to earn above-average salaries. It is a good career path if you have an interest in data analytics and project management.

  • Can You Become a Business Intelligence Analyst Without a Degree? You can become a business intelligence analyst without a degree if you enroll in a coding bootcamp or take online classes. Coding bootcamps have become popular in recent years, and their graduates are highly valued by employers.
  • Is It Hard to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst? No, it is not hard to become a business intelligence analyst. If you follow the necessary steps like getting an education and building relevant skills, you will be well on your way to a fulfilling career.
  • What Education Do You Need to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst? To become a business intelligence analyst, you need to have a degree or training from a coding bootcamp. You should earn analytical skills, data skills, and communication skills.
  • Is Business Intelligence a Good Career? Yes, business intelligence is a good career for anyone who wants to start a career in tech and has a background in mathematics. The demand for BI analysts is high, and the employment opportunity is expected to keep growing in years to come.

Explore other careers

  • Firefighter
  • Data Scientist
  • User Researcher
  • PHP Developer
  • Enterprise Architect
  • Cyber Security Engineer
  • Veterinary Technician
  • Blockchain Developer
  • Geriatrician
  • Community Health Worker
  • Physical Therapist
  • Nutritionist
  • Medical Assistant
  • Full Stack Developer
  • Scrum Project Management
  • Pharmacy Tech
  • Interaction Designer
  • iOS Developer
  • Travel Agent
  • Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist

DiscoverDataScience.org

How to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst – A Complete Career Guide

As the data collected by businesses grows more and more vast and complex, it becomes that much more important for companies to utilize that data effectively. This “untidy data” can become difficult to even navigate, let alone slice, dice, and refine in order to gain real insights. That’s where a business intelligence analyst comes in.  

Business intelligence analysts help a company put the data it already collects to use in order to increase the company’s efficiency and maximize profits. They comb through large amounts of data by querying databases effectively, and then produce reports and identify trends to generate actionable business insights. Business intelligence analysts must have a range of data analytics skills that serve them well in the world of big data, especially data analysis, as well as keen business understanding that is crucial in a field that hinges so heavily on soft skills like teamwork and polished communication skills in both the written and verbal realms.  

What is a Business Intelligence Analyst?  

Business intelligence analysts are a necessary part of making the extensive amount of data now available to companies useful. Business intelligence analysts straddle the worlds of business and information technology, having a firm grasp of each, and are able to mine and analyze data to recommend growth strategies for a company.  

Once a business intelligence analyst makes recommendations for technological advances in a company, they are often needed to lead seminars for colleagues, including training managers to implement and monitor these new systems.  

What does a Business Intelligence Analyst do?  

In the data science workforce of today, the business intelligence analyst evaluates both the data of the company itself as well as data from competitors and others in the industry, in order to discover ways to improve their own company’s market position. Good business intelligence analysts will look into their company’s systems, procedures, and functions, and find areas in which the company can increase efficiency and profit margins. 

Business intelligence analysts also must consider new ways in which a company can develop new policies regarding data collection and data analysis methodologies, including ensuring integrity of data use. Business intelligence analysts may also be charged with hiring other data specialists at times, such as data architects. 

To learn about related careers visit our data science career center.

Five Steps to Launching a Successful Business Intelligence Analyst Career:  

Step 1: Earn your Undergraduate Degree  

Undergraduates should look for degrees in information systems, computer science,  data science , business administration, engineering, economics, or a related field that gives you insight into business processes and organizational operations. You’ll need to understand as much as you can about data before entering the profession, so look for classes in data architecture, database design, data mining, data visualization, and so on. You’ll also want to have strong Excel and SQL skills before graduating. 

Step 2: Complete an Internship and Gain Entry-level Work Experience  

Business intelligence analysts are expected to have work experience before entering the job, unless able to supplement that experience with something like a Master’s in Business Administration, which may suffice for some employers. One good way to begin your training is to get an internship in the financial industry, which will give you the opportunity to learn about the inner workings of a business.  

After you graduate, consider a job as a data analyst , business analyst, or a data report writer. Look for chances in these jobs to query SQL, model and analyze data, and define and manage the scope of projects. All of these experiences will give you vital contacts in the industry, as well as a better sense of the end-to-end process of the kind of projects that a business intelligence analyst completes on a regular basis. 

Step 3: Get a Professional Certification  

The best professional certification for business intelligence analysts is  Microsoft Certified: Data Analyst Associate . This certification proves that you have the skills necessary to design and use SQL to deliver data-based solutions. The exam includes querying and administering SQL databases, implementing a data warehouse and data models, and designing business solutions.  

Another option is  TDWI’s Certified Business Intelligence Professional , which you can test for and receive at the levels of either “practitioner” or “mastery.” You’ll need at least 2 years of relevant work experience to register for this exam. You may also want to get a certification in specific computer languages, like  SAS . 

Step 4: Become a Business Intelligence Analyst  

Typically, a business intelligence analyst is not an entry-level role, although you may find having already earned an MBA (more on that below) can substitute for some years on the ground in the eyes of certain employers according to  Indeed . Once you have developed the necessary skills, gained work experience, and gotten certified professionally, you can apply for business intelligence analyst positions. You will be required to have an average of about 4 or 5 years of work experience, though some roles require up to 8 years of work experience. You will also likely need 1 or 2 years of supervisory experience within an organization, as business intelligence analysts are often project managers and can sometimes have hiring responsibilities. 

Step 5: Pursue an Advanced Degree  

A  master’s degree in business administration (MBA)  is preferred for this role, though master’s are generally not required if a candidate has sufficient work experience and professional certifications. You can also get a master’s in information technology, or a master’s in the industry you want to specialize in.  

Business Intelligence Analyst Job Description  

  • Meet with clients to identify needs and concerns 
  • Conduct information-gathering interviews and obtain feedback from clients and customers 
  • Collect data and extract data from warehouses for reporting, using querying techniques 
  • Analyze current data with software applications 
  • Create summary reports of a company’s current standings  
  • Present recommendations to senior management about ways in increase efficiency  
  • Oversee implementation of technological initiatives 
  • Develop new analytical models and techniques for a company to standardize data collection 

Skills Needed to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst  

Business Skills:  

  • Excellent communication and presentation skills in order to share recommendations often based on highly technical data with colleagues in an approachable, easily digestible way 
  • Superior leadership abilities, as well as ability to brainstorm and collaborate with team members on a data science project 
  • Creative problem-solving skills and critical thinking 
  • Ability to work within a diverse, global workforce that is oriented around customer satisfaction, particularly as many business intelligence analysts are asked to work directly with clients 

Technical Skills:  

  • Database design and data architecture 
  • Data mining and analytics  
  • Data security and privacy  
  • Data visualization, including tools such as  Tableau  and Qlik 
  • Handle all variants of  SQL  
  • Proficient in ETL (extract, transform, load) 
  • Understand which situations need  Hadoop ,  R , and  SAS  and use these effectively  
  • Cloud computing and data storage technology, such as Google’s  BigQuery  and Amazon’s  Redshift  

Business Intelligence Analyst Salary  

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) categorizes business intelligence analysts as operations research analysts. As of May 2021, the BLS reports that the median annual salary for business intelligence analysts under this general classification is $82,360 . This can vary based on location.

For instance, the BLS says the mean salary for a business analyst in California is $99,220 . However, professionals in Virginia have a mean salary of $117,480. But even though California has a lower mean salary overall, the San Jose metropolitan area hosts a mean salary of $164,730, the highest in the country as of May 2021. Depending on the area and business, skills in data warehousing, data modeling, and data mining may increase an analyst’s salary potential.

Business intelligence analysts often move into higher-level jobs within 10 years, including roles such as analytics manager, business intelligence manager, business intelligence architect, and analytics manager.  

Business Intelligence Analyst job outlook  

The job market for business intelligence analysts is expected to grow by 23% from 2021 to 2031 according to the BLS’s operations research analyst page. They are required in many different fields, from healthcare to education to finance to law enforcement. Organizations in all of these fields and more are looking for ways to compete and stand out, and business intelligence analysts can provide necessary insights using data to create these advantages. Thus, they are highly sought-after individuals. Provided you have the right skills, experience, and interest in solving problems you will be able to set yourself apart in this competitive yet thriving job market.

Gain the skills and necessary degree to pursue your career as a business intelligence analyst. Explore choosing a Master’s in Business Analytics, including Business Intelligence and online business intelligence program options , or What is the Difference Between Business Intelligence and Data Science and take the next step in your journey. Your future as a business intelligence analyst awaits you!

2021 US Bureau of Labor Statistics salary and employment figures for operations research analysts reflect national data, not school-specific information. Conditions in your area may vary. Data accessed January 2023.

business intelligence career roadmap

  • Related Programs

wiley university servieces logo

Help everyone explore and learn from data—no SQL required.

Business intelligence for everyone

Share insights with anyone, anywhere

Create seamless in-product analytics

Self-service BI in 5 minutes

Advanced tools and controls

White glove treatment

to see how to set up and publish a dashboard

Guides on working with data

News, updates and ideas

Join a live event or watch on demand

Real companies, real data, real stories

Share and connect with other users

Find an expert partner

Practical advice from our community

Read now: The Startup's Guide to Financial Modeling

Business intelligence career paths

The metabase team.

‧ 8 min read

Share this article

In this post we’ll take a look at some common roles within data teams and what it takes to get them.

Businesses structure their data teams differently — there’s no one-size-fits-all structure or org chart that will map to every organization out there.

While it’s not unheard of for data professionals to shift from one of these roles to another, they each have their own focuses and require distinct skill sets. If you’re interested in exploring a BI career and enjoy working with data, one of the roles below may match your skills and career goals.

Data analyst

Data analysts are typically tasked with gathering, processing, and evaluating the data that their organization generates. This includes analyzing and interpreting information, creating reports, and extracting insights drawn from different datasets. Data analysts tend to be heavily involved in the business side of things, like presenting findings to important company stakeholders; they often work closely with product managers, who shape the direction a product based on those findings. Ultimately, analysts are there to help their organization make smarter and better-informed decisions.

As a data analyst, you’ll need a strong grasp of SQL to succeed, along with data visualization skills and experience with statistics and statistical programming. You should know how to use — but not necessarily develop — spreadsheet software, databases, and data warehousing applications . You should also develop soft skills like critical thinking and storytelling, as analysts must be able to draw conclusions from data and convey their findings to others within their organization.

There’s plenty of room for growth if data analysis is your chosen career path. Since analysts rely on soft skills in addition to technical knowledge, they’re often well-equipped to manage teams, and may, after some years of experience, end up with titles Analytics Manager, Data Lead, or VP of Data. If you aren’t interested in managing a team, you can still level up as an analyst as you become more and more of an expert, either in general analytical skills or in the analysis of a particular domain.

Data scientist

While data analysts examine historical data, data scientists deal with data modeling and prescriptive analytics. For example, a data scientist may build machine learning models to make predictions about their organization’s data. These predictions could involve about their company’s product, forecasting demand, or predicting internal matters like anticipating fraud.

Knowing SQL and how to best visualize data is important for data scientists, along with programming languages like Python and R. Since data scientists work so extensively with predictive models, these roles also demand strong mathematics skills like linear algebra (especially where machine learning is involved), multivariable calculus, and statistics. You probably won’t spend every moment of every day as a data scientist working alone on a machine learning model — communication skills and the ability to work well with a team are important too.

The career trajectory of a data scientist can fall along similar lines as an analyst. However, just like in software engineering, not all data scientists will eventually end up managing people. Many data scientists remain individual contributors, especially once they’ve carved out an invaluable niche at their organization.

BI developer

You can think of business intelligence developers as situated somewhere between analysis-heavy roles like data scientists and analysts and engineering roles like an analytics engineer or data engineer. The “BI” part is important here — while there may be some overlap with data analysts, the work of BI developers tends to have a greater focus on data that directly affects business decisions and outcomes. This can involve creating and tracking metrics like KPIs , as well more in-depth usage of a BI tool. A lot of this work involves building out dashboards to encourage self-service analytics, creating reports that can be used again and again, and knowing how to best harness the tools in an organization’s data stack , both through the lens of analysis and infrastructure.

A good BI developer possesses a strong foundation in database technologies and crafting complex and performant queries (most likely in SQL), but also knows what information their colleagues need in a dashboard and how best to present that. Possessing some business acumen helps a lot too, as BI developers anticipate the needs of their organization and how the results of their analyses can lead to successful outcomes.

Data engineer

Data engineers are intimately familiar with the inner workings of an organization’s data infrastructure and pipelines, as they’re tasked with building and/or maintaining those pipelines. These engineers make sure that data can make its way from the source to the data warehouse and onward to an organization’s BI tool. They’re also the ones preparing data for analysts and data scientists, making sure that systems are functional and efficiently structured, and working with other engineers to define what data gets captured in the first place.

Strong coding skills are a must for people who take on these roles, where there’s less focus on analysis and interpretation than the positions discussed above. Familiarity with elements of the data pipeline is important too; knowing how to work with different data warehouse platforms will give you a leg up.

Analytics engineer

Analytics engineers are typically tasked with modeling data, doing ETL work, and transforming and munging data within datasets to make it usable by analysts and scientists. Analytics engineers are the ones on the team making sure that end users have clean datasets to work with, part of an industry-wide shift toward encouraging self-service analytics within organizations.

Analytics engineers tend to have a broader skill set than data engineers, and possess some applied knowledge of how end users are working with the data they transform and prepare. If you want to go this route, sharpening your SQL skills is a good idea, as is knowing how to use different data transformation tools. Don’t neglect the soft skills either, since communication is fundamental to working across teams in a role like this one.

Educational pathways to a BI career

Data science programs — like undergraduate majors, Master’s degrees, bootcamps, and certificates — have exploded in recent years, but there’s still no surefire educational pathway to landing one of these roles.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, a lot of BI jobs, particularly those on the engineering end, attract people from STEM backgrounds, like those with expertise in statistics, computer science, or mathematics. However, plenty of data professionals from unconventional backgrounds like the humanities or communication thrive in this field, drawing on skills like critical thinking and effective decision-making to analyze and interpret data.

Breaking into business intelligence

If you recently received or are working on your degree and want to get your foot in the door for a career in business intelligence, consider seeking out an internship in one of the areas that interests you. A great way to gain hands-on experience within a real working environment, internships can also be helpful in getting a better feel for what you do or don’t want to pursue, what kinds of working environments you enjoy, and providing opportunities for mentorship.

If you’re currently working in a non-BI role at an organization but want to test the business intelligence waters, see if you can participate in any projects that involve data work. If that’s not possible yet, start even smaller, like setting up informational interviews with people on the data team or sitting in on their team meetings. If your organization uses a BI tool where you can dig into data analysis yourself, spend some time getting to know how it works and what you can learn about your data while using it.

As with most technology-focused jobs, you’ll be much better off if you learn by doing. While knowing SQL is foundational to many business intelligence careers, don’t think you need to memorize every SQL command out there in order to land a data job. In fact, don’t do that! This guidance isn’t exclusive to learning SQL; it’s is a good rule of thumb for all technologies and applications as your develop your data skill set. Having some foundational knowledge of a concept is an important first step, but building out projects of your own as you construct a portfolio demonstrates a lot more to employers than telling them about all the SQL books you’ve read. One way to start is by learning to analyze a dataset you’re interested in — maybe it’s weather patterns or baseball stats. Once you have a dataset to dig into, learning to run specific queries or analyze certain information will be a lot more engaging and fruitful as you embark on your BI career journey.

You might also enjoy

How to keep your data team alive.

If you don't understand data roles enough to scope job descriptions or workload, get ready for burnout, turnover, and the death of company-wide data culture. Our data team offers some advice on how to build a healthy data team.

The two most important business metrics to track

Effective metrics are not a one-size-fits-all solution. Here's how to create a useful North Star metric and counter metric to start building out your metrics store.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Become a Business Intelligence Analyst

No fluff. No outdated tutorials. No overpriced bootcamp. This Business Intelligence Analyst Career Path is your step-by-step roadmap to go from beginner (at any age!) to getting hired. You’ll be guided through our curated curriculum of courses, workshops, challenges, and action items to build your skills, portfolio and experience to become a Business Intelligence Analyst.

Earn on average $86,274 per year

US salary data collected from Indeed, Hired.com, and Web3.career 2023 .

Your career path

What you'll learn.

  • Launch a career at the intersection of business, data, and technology as a Business Intelligence Analyst
  • Learn to fetch massive datasets from text files, databases and more, then shape and transform them for analysis
  • Analyze data with the power of Excel formulas and the DAX programming language
  • Create stunning, dynamic visualizations with industry-standard tools like Excel and PowerBI
  • Automate processes and build your own enterprise-level data tools

The Excel Bootcamp: Zero to Mastery

Believe it or not, you now have enough skills to start applying to jobs and even get hired! This process usually takes a while and it's good to start even if you don't feel "ready". Apply to 5 jobs online right now and see what happens. You don't even need to "want" these jobs. The goal is to practice applying and practice going through the interview process. Once you finish applying to 5 jobs (you don't need to hear back), move on to the next step in this Career Path.

Academy Workshop: Career Advice

See whole career path

What ztm students are saying.

Our courses and community have helped 1,000s of Zero To Mastery students go from zero to getting hired to levelling up their skills and advancing their careers to new heights.

Meet your instructors

Your Career Path instructors aren’t just experts with years of real-world professional experience. They have been in your shoes. They make learning fun. They make complex topics feel simple. They will motivate you. They will push you. And they go above and beyond to help you succeed.

Travis Cuzick

Travis Cuzick

Andrei Neagoie

Andrei Neagoie

Diogo Resende

Diogo Resende

Mo Binni

Still have questions?

Who is this business intelligence career path for.

Anyone who wants a clear step-by-step guide to learn the latest industry techniques and tools, become a Business Intelligence Analyst from scratch, and actually get hired. Oh ya, and you don't want to waste your money on overpriced bootcamps and degrees.

Also, let's be honest. Some of the topics can be a little dry. So, we're even going to have a bit of fun along the way. No way! Crazy right?!

This Business Intelligence Analyst Career Path is perfect for you if:

  • You're a complete beginner (of any age!) and want a full bootcamp curriculum and experience without having to pay $1,000s
  • You don't want to waste your valuable time. You want to learn everything needed to become a BI Analyst in one place
  • You want to build real-world, enterprise-level projects that will push you, challenge you and make your portfolio and resume stand out
  • You don't want to learn and take this journey alone. You will learn alongside 100s of other students at your same level and 1,000s more that are just a few steps ahead of you

And it's definitely for you if you're sick of:

  • Outdated tutorials
  • Free courses and tutorials that don't go beyond the basics
  • Learning topics and concepts that are mostly irrelevant in the real-world and don't even get asked in interviews
  • Courses with no community or support system
  • Tutorial hell
  • Feeling like you're going in circles with no clear path or end in sight

Let's be 100% clear. You aren't going to do 100 coding challenges or 50 projects or learn topics that aren't going to get you hired or even be used in the real-world. That's a waste of your time.

The sooner you get hired, the sooner you'll be learning more than you can from any course. That's the goal of this Career Path.

Why become a Business Intelligence Analyst?

Everyone has their own reason(s) as to why they want to become a BI Analyst. But here are a few of the best reasons:

  • Lots of jobs available. As we're writing this, there are over 175,000 Business Intelligence job postings available on ZipRecruiter (not to mention GlassDoor, Linkedin, Indeed or elsewhere). And it isn't going to slow down. The amount of data being generated is growing exponentially every single day, and the need for companies to help make sense of this data and take advantage of it is growing exponentially along with it. That's where BI Analysts come in, and they're getting more important every single day.
  • High demand = High salary. The average annual salary for a Business Intelligence Analyst in the United States is ~$90,000 across all levels (entry-level to senior). Plus BI Analyst knowledge and skills are well-known for being advantageous for C-suite executives, meaning your career has lots of upward mobility potential.
  • No degree required. It's very possible to get hired as a Business Analyst without having any college degree. You also definitely do not need a Computer Science degree to be a Business Analyst.
  • Work remotely. Many data-related jobs are remote. Work from the comfort of your own home, a coffee shop or even while travelling the world. Some roles even allow you to work on your own schedule.
  • It's fun. And rewarding. You get to have a real-world impact. The work you're doing on a daily basis can have a huge impact on hundreds, thousands, or even millions of people.

How long does it take to become a Business Intelligence Analyst (and complete this Career Path)?

Everyone is different. So it's hard to give a specific amount of time. The two biggest variables are the number of hours per week you're dedicating to completing the steps in the Career Path and your current experience level.

Don't hold us to it but here's a rough guideline based on feedback we've received from past ZTM students on how long it takes to become a BI Analyst:

  • 20-40 hours a week = 4-6 months. Students who have started from scratch as complete beginners (no matter their age!) and spend a few hours per day.
  • 40-80 hours a week = 2-3 months. Students who are able to learn basically full-time and/or already have some experience (ex: students that already have advanced Excel analysis skills).
  • 0-10 hours a week = 7-12+ months. Students from all experience levels but are only able to dedicate a few hours a week.

What’s the ZTM Discord community and how can it help me?

The ZTM Discord is our exclusive online community for ZTM students, alumni, TAs and instructors.

How it helps you, short version: Increase the chances that ZTM students achieve their current goals and help them continue to grow throughout their career.

Longer version: Learning alone is hard. We've all been there. We've all tried to learn new skills and struggled. It can be frustrating, daunting, and just plain challenging, especially if you're trying to change careers.

We feel strongly that the Zero To Mastery Discord community is an essential part of the learning experience and greatly increases the chances for students to achieve their goals.

It's crazy to think that Colleges and Coding Bootcamps charge you tens of thousands of dollars to provide you with this type of experience. It doesn't have to be that way!

In fact, ~20% of ZTM students are also enrolled at a College or in-person Coding Bootcamp but feel like they just aren't getting all of the skills and support they need. But with ZTM, they do.

Within the Zero To Mastery Discord community, you can:

  • Connect with other Developers, Engineers, Data Scientists, Designers
  • Form study groups and complete ZTM Career Paths and Courses together
  • Ask questions and get advice from other people at your same level as well as more experienced professionals
  • Get feedback on projects
  • Meet other students around the world (and likely even someone from your hometown!)
  • Learn how to answer questions and help other students which will accelerate your own learning
  • Get help from others with questions and exercises
  • Work on coding challenges and real-world open-source projects with other students

It’s pretty awesome to see many ZTM alumni also active every single day, continuing to engage with the community, give back, and level up their own skills and career.

Are there any prerequisites for this Career Path?

A computer (Windows/Mac/Linux) and access to the internet. That's it! No previous experience is needed.

If you haven't already, take our tech career path quiz . We'll give you our recommendation for which path is the best fit for you.

How is a Career Path different from a course?

Career Paths are like a full College curriculum. Our Career Paths give you the exact courses, workshops, challenges, articles and actions to take to go from absolute beginner to getting hired.

Career Paths start with ensuring you know the foundations from scratch. But they go far beyond by teaching you advanced topics and non-technical skills that are essential for your career but aren't taught in Computer Science Degrees or Coding Bootcamps.

Courses are more focused. Different courses have different goals. Some courses are a great fit for experienced Developers, Engineers and Programmers who want to level-up their skills in a specific topic or framework. Other courses cover a wider range of topics teaching the foundations and fundamentals for beginners.

Can I change my Career Path?

Yes. You can change your Career Path anytime. As a member of Zero To Mastery , you have unlimited access to all ZTM courses, workshops, challenges, articles and other materials needed to complete any of the ZTM Career Paths .

Invest in a better you. For less than a coffee a day.

Every ztm membership includes :.

We know you'll love ZTM. That's why we provide a no hassle, 30-day money back guarantee.

The Different Career Paths in Business Intelligence (BI)

Apr 24, 2017

person in yellow rain jack looking at road running in two directions

There are different career paths within BI that you can take to achieve your goals, and these paths will each foster big opportunities for you to learn and grow.

Before we begin, let’s define business intelligence…

We define  business intelligence (BI) as taking data and transforming it into meaningful information that is then used to make smarter business decisions.

The Foundational Skills of All BI Positions

The foundational skills of all BI positions entail data management concepts coupled with data manipulation skills.

The more traditional BI route involves mastering relational concepts coupled with SQL (Structured Query Language) as well as mastering non-structured concepts involving Hadoop coupled with Python. This knowledge is used religiously throughout any BI position – whether at the beginning or at the end of your career.

A great place to start learning the basics of SQL code for free is at  Code Academy . And here’s a great resource to start learning more about Hadoop.

A quick note – if you’re reading this as a college student who’s trying to decide his or her major, Management Information Systems , Business Information Systems , Intelligence Studies , Statistics , and anything in Computer Science are excellent majors for a career in Business Intelligence & Analytics.  

Two Different Paths One Can Take

There are two main paths to consider for a career in BI, and they are generally thought of as the “back-end” and “front-end.” Both of these paths are rich in opportunities. Furthermore, there are plenty of BI professionals that take a shot at both of these paths over their career as a way to gain more knowledge, broaden their skillset, and generate more opportunities.

Let’s discuss the back-end career path first.  

Business Intelligence Career Path: Back-End Development

For back-end BI development, the foundational skills revolve around 3 primary capabilities.

  • The ability to source data : This involves being able to collect data in whatever system, stream, location, and format it exists.
  • The ability to manipulate data : The raw data you’re working with will need to be validated, cleansed, and integrated. And in some instances, business logic will need to be applied to the data. This is the first step in creating value from the data.
  • The ability to create data structures and storage architecture : In order to make the data useful to an audience of users, it must be organized and structured in a way that makes it intuitive to the user audiences and responsive to requests and queries.

People typically call back-end work the “technical” side of BI. Back-end work is hardly noticed by the end-user, hence the name. Working on the technical side of BI involves less design of what you’re delivering for your company/client and more hands-on development, programming, and coding of the solution. That’s not to say that if you’re a back-end developer you won’t ever be doing architecture and design work. But for the majority of your time, you will be doing more technical tasks like development, and less design.

The back-end skill set from a general perspective is known as “Extraction, Transformation, and Loading” (ETL). ETL concepts can be easily studied and understood, but hands-on work with data and developing the code to move the data around is what really gains you valuable experience.  

Business Intelligence Career Path: Front-End Development

And then there’s the other path for BI professionals: front-end development .

The foundational skill for “front-end” BI workers is the presentation of information.

Professionals from a front-end perspective must be able to access the needed data to support the reporting or analytics product for which they are creating. More importantly, the professional must understand the context for which the information is to be used – from both the problem it analyzes to the audience that’s consuming it.

The goal of front-end work is to place information into a context that allows the consumer of the information (the user) to use it to make smart decisions. Many of these roles use SQL (or a software tool that creates SQL for you) to both query and manipulate that data into a context that takes the form of reports or dashboards for your customer (internal customer or external customer).

***Outside of the traditional SQL tools, there are other options for front-end BI development, such as BIRT , Jaspersoft Community , Qlik Sense , Microsoft Power BI , Tableau Public, and more.

People typically call front-end development the “functional side” of BI. It is in this position where your ability to interact and listen to your customers’ needs is extremely valuable. The technical ability to develop the interfaces in order to provide the reporting and analytics they have requested is vital to have as well.

Outstanding front-end BI developers are able to build reports and dashboards that are both very easy to use and visually appealing. Additionally, great front-end BI developers are able to present a company’s data in a meaningful way that shows users important trends in their company’s data. Doing so generates invaluable business insights and knowledge that would not be realized without business intelligence. These professionals also routinely provide support to users and ensure the proper configuration and management of the BI solutions they are responsible for.

Some common skills companies look for in front-end BI developers are a strong understanding of data visualization best practices, ETL experience, strong analytical and quantitative skills, and strong communication skills.  

Popular Job Titles in Business Intelligence

– Big Data/Hadoop Developer

– Business Intelligence Consultant

– Database Applications Developer

– Data Warehouse Developer

– Data Warehousing Consultant

– ETL Developer  

Have Questions About a Career in BI?

If you have any questions regarding a career in business intelligence, leave a comment or contact us and we will get back to you as soon as we can with an answer.

22 Comments

In order to get a major, the recomendation are: “Management Information Systems, Business Information Systems, Intelligence Studies, Statistics, and anything in Computer Science are excellent majors for a career in Business Intelligence & Analytics”. But if i want to specialize in Front-End Development ¿it’s there any recommendation?

Thanks a lot

Thank you for your comment. If you wanted to specialize in Front-End Development , our top recommendation would be Computer Science. That’s if we had to choose one. And again, you can’t go wrong with the other majors we listed in our article.

Also, we noticed that your comment had some Spanish punctuation…so here’s our reply in Spanish as well:

Muchas gracias por su comentario. Si quiere hacer “Front-End Development’, le recomendamos estudiar las informáticas. Y una vez más, las otras carreras que mencionamos todavía son buenos opciones.

Please let us know if you have any more questions, and if you haven’t yet, be sure to subscribe to our blog!

The Key2 Consulting team

I am a newbie in IT and my desire as a holder of bachelor degree in Accounting is to become a Business Intelligence Analyst.

what career path of Business Intelligence Analyst will be best suited for me as an accountant and how to be certified?

Your recommendation is highly required.

Many thanks and regards Folorunso

Hi Folorunso,

Thank you very much for your comment! We recommend you start looking at Microsoft Power BI. It’s a free tool that you can use to quickly analyze any financial data you may currently have. If you want to become certified, we recommend obtaining a certification in Microsoft Power BI. You can find more info here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/learning/mcsa-bi-reporting.aspx .

Great Article!Your article explains key aspects of BI. I am a graduate student and I have immense interest in the field. I would like to get some career advice related BI profession. Apart from Business domain knowledge what would be key technical skill sets that I should possess (except SQL). Is time come that SQL is no longer only technical skill required for BI ? and everyone is shifting to other frameworks or database? What would you suggest(tips) to a freshly graduated student?

Best Regards, Urmil Maru

Thank you for your comment! It’s great to hear you have a lot of interest in the Business Intelligence & Analytics field.

To answer your question, SQL is a great skill to have but most curriculums focus on 3rd and 4th normal form. It’s also great to learn Star Schema architecture and/or denormalized architecture, as both are very beneficial for any reporting database.

Some Microsoft-specific skills we recommend proficiency in are SSIS development and SSAS Tabular (2016 and forward). Microsoft has shifted its reporting to focus on Dax, with Microsoft PowerBI and SSAS Tabular.

Additionally, C# or VB .NET development is great for custom development. And lastly, Javascript is always a great skillset to have.

We hope that helps!

– The Key2 Consulting Team

I am considering a job opportunity as a BI consultant. My goal is to become a solution consultant/engineer in the future. I believe as a BI consultant you would get the technical and customer facing skills necessary for a presales consultant.

I would like to know your opinion on the matter. Would it be possible to move from one to the other and what the path would look like. My education consists of a BSc. in physics and an MBA.

Let me start off by saying thank you for the very informative article. But I’m curious as to the type of process I’d have to go through to begin a career in BI as a college Grad. I’m currently a college junior majoring in Intelligence studies and minoring in Business Admin. What do you think would be a good place for someone who is in college or just graduated to start?

Any advice would be helpful. Thank you.

We are unsure if there is a step-by-step formula that we can give you for becoming a BI consultant. What we can tell you is that the way we look at potential candidates is by judging their aptitude and attitude. We believe that we can teach a person the technical aspects needed to be a successful consultant as long as they have the aptitude to learn and they are excited about learning, and that they have the kind of attitude that is eager to learn and work with others. The technical degree and excelling in those classes certainly gets your foot in the door, but aptitude and attitude is what will provide the foundation to make you successful.

Sam, thanks for your question. Our response requires first giving a little bit of background on what we would consider to be the differences between a solution consultant/engineer and a presales consultant.

When you use the terms “ solution ” and “ engineer ” together, we believe you are describing someone who understands how to leverage various technologies and methodologies to provide a plan to solve a business problem. This requires a good bit of hands on technical experience under your belt, coupled with an excellent understanding of the process for gathering – or probably better described as ferreting out – requirements. A solution engineer must understand how the entire picture fits together at a very granular level.

When you talk about a presales consultant, we believe you are describing someone who has a deep understanding of a specific software product or product line. The presales consultant is there to help a client understand how the product works from a deep technical perspective (helping the client understand how the software is installed, how it can be integrated with existing systems, how it is managed or customized, and so on…) Many times, a presales consultant is called upon to build proof of concepts to allow the client to see how the product looks and performs on their specific data or under their specific conditions. Once again, this role is going to require that you have a really good understanding of the process for gathering (ferreting out) requirements.

To be successful at either of these roles you are going to need experience. More specifically you need to see what it looks like to have a successful project and understand how issues were either avoided or dealt with swiftly and effectively – essentially all the little things that go into making the project a success. You will also benefit from working on a project that has gone “off the rails” as you’ll that experience will (ideally) give you an understanding of how and why things went wrong. These roles can all come from having experience as a BI consultant. As a BI consultant you are going to be getting hands-on experience with technology and you will also get an opportunity to see different projects under different architects. Many consultants get a lot of different opportunities, really helping them grow their experience and knowledge.

Hi, This is valuable information.Since I began my career three years ago, I have been working as a Data warehouse developer (ETL with SQL and SSIS) and visualisations with Tableau. Now I am at a point where I should decide my further career plan and I get overwhelmed with the flood of BI and Machine learning information around. Weather focusing on R and Python as such would be beneficial or should I focus more on the other side (Big data,Hadoop etc)? So,in general what other paths are available going forward in BI space?

Thanks for your comment! There are countless paths available in the BI space, which is likely why you often feel overwhelmed by the flood of information.

You will have to decide what you really enjoy doing within the Business Intelligence process.

So, do you like being “behind the scenes” with ETL development, building the database and understanding the intricacies of databases?

Do you like interacting with the business and trying to understanding their needs and providing it through reporting?

Also, there are two habits that you need to foster as you continue in your career…

– Become an expert (in your current work)

– Become a continual learner (for your future work)

And just remember that there is not a single person who knows everything! Find a good community in which you can share ideas and grow in your expertise.

– The Key2 Consulting Team

Hi, I have recently joined BI and analytics team for position of ” MIS report developer”. This is OLTP process. The tool we are using to develop reports is BIEE and database is ORACLE. We are not using ETL (olap) process. kindly suggest me good career advice ragarding this field. looking for your response.

I find this a great read. I’m a BI Developer having worked on MS BI, ERP BI, and Power BI. I have crossed the ‘back-end’ and ‘front-end’ boundaries. I prefer the front-end side. When looking at job adverts for a BI Developer, almost, always specifies back-end skills and therefore I was searching to categorize what job role would be a front-end developer. I guess it still is a BI Developer but maybe the required skills are placed under a different role, maybe an Analyst of some sort. Is it usual for a front-end developer to specialize in specific tools, maybe 1 or 2, or they expected to know a full breadth of toolsets? For a front-end type role, what should you focus your energy on learning to maximize job opportunities? Best. Paul.

Thank you very much for your comment! Glad you enjoyed our post.

To answer your first question, we believe the most important skill to master (when thinking about career decisions as a BI front-end developer / BI Analyst) is your ability to place information into context. Placing information into context demands that you keenly listen to and thoroughly understand the needs of the consumers of the information. It is your job as a front-end developer to turn those info needs (requirements) into a tangible artifact(s).

How successful you are in meeting the consumers’ goals depends on how easily they are able to use your artifacts to positively impact the job they do and the decisions they make.

To follow on the above. I would consider Tableau, Power BI, Qlikview, SSRS, SSAS Tabular, SQL, M, DAX, and small dataset modelling as a good number of front-end skills. If you do not work with each then it will be difficult to master them in your own time. Is there a specific few to master to put one in good stead as a front-end BI Developer with a crossover to an Analyst type role? What is the future trend saying? Best. Paul.

And to answer your second question!

Most of the font-end BI tools will use SQL. Being able to get accurate data out of your source system is very important! Power BI is free and is a great starting point. The Microsoft product can bring a lot of value to most companies (even if they own other BI products) because it’s free. Also, DAX would be great to know if you are working with Power BI.

SSRS and SSAS are cheaper than other BI tools, so many companies have them as a result.

Tableau is a good front-end tool and has strong demand in the market. It’s definitely an expensive product, so deep knowledge in the product will likely only help if you’re at a company that can afford it. With that said, learning Tableau will teach you some great dashboard modeling techniques.

Qlikview is interesting…the tool has its own backend language and methodology. And it definitely has a big following. Learning Qlik would obviously be great if the company you’re at owns the product. But outside of an environment that owns the tool, mastering Qluk will not have a ton of benefit.

Does that help answer your question? We hope so. Thank you again for your comments!

Nice share up there

Hi I have 5 years of experience in runbook automation. I want to enter BI profile now. What is the best way for me to do it. I dont have any experience in SQL or other programming language but i have some experience with splunk.

Should i continue with splunk or go for PowerBI or SQL depending on job market in india.

Hi Kushagra,

Thank you for your comment! That’s great that you want to enter the BI industry. We can’t speak for the job market in India, but we can speak for what we would recommend doing in the US.

While there are a ton of factors to consider here (so it’s hard for us to answer), we’d recommend becoming highly proficient in SQL first. SQL is the foundation for BI. You can then add proficiencies and expertise in market-leading tools like Microsoft PowerBI once you’ve become highly knowledgable in SQL.

We hope that helps and good luck!

Hi I have 5 years of experience as SQL Server database Administrator. I want to move to BI field now. Could you suggest right approach to do that, Any certification or tool which I can learn . Any suggestion will be really helpful.

I am a newbie in IT but have worked in the oil and gas industry for 5 years. My desire is to become a Business Intelligence Analyst. what career path of Business Intelligence Analyst will be best suited for me and how do I get certified? Your recommendation is highly required.

Many thanks and regards Barbara

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  • Prepare for the Future – Learn to Use a BI Tool Today - ClicData - […] Learning a BI tool will become a critical skill for most business professionals. The BI opportunity applies not only…

Grow your analytics knowledge.

Recent Posts

  • Power BI Dashboard Example
  • What are Power BI Datamarts?
  • Power BI Dashboards vs Reports – What’s the Difference?
  • Amazon QuickSight
  • Application Development
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Azure Cosmos DB
  • Azure Data Factory
  • Azure Databricks
  • Azure Machine Learning
  • Business Intelligence
  • Cloud Technology
  • Conferences
  • Custom Development
  • Data Encryption
  • Data Governance
  • Data Management
  • Data Regulations
  • Data Security
  • Data Visualization
  • Data Warehousing
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Fantasy Football
  • Key2 Stories
  • Machine Learning
  • Microsoft Excel
  • Microsoft Power Automate
  • Microsoft Power BI
  • Microsoft PowerApps
  • Open Source
  • Self-Service BI
  • Software Development
  • Tales from Consulting
  • Technical Information
  • Uncategorized
  • Web Applications
  • Web Development
  • What's Happening at Key2
  • Interview Questions
  • Generative AI
  • Machine Learning
  • Deep Learning

BI Analyst Career Path / Roadmap

BI Analyst Career Path Career Roadmap

Are you interested in a career that combines data analysis, technology, and business strategy? Look no further than the role of a Business Intelligence (BI) Analys t. In this blog post, we will explore the career path/career roadmap of a BI Analyst , highlighting the various job titles, and discussing the skills and responsibilities associated with this in-demand profession.

Table of Contents

What is Business Intelligence?

Business Intelligence (BI) refers to the process of collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data to gain valuable insights that drive informed business decisions. It is an umbrella term that encompasses the tools, methodologies, and processes used to transform raw data into meaningful information and actionable insights. It involves the collection, analysis, and interpretation of data from various sources within an organization to provide valuable insights that support strategic decision-making and improve overall business performance.

To better understand the concept, let’s consider an example of how Business Intelligence can help in overall business strategy:

Imagine a retail company that operates both physical stores and an e-commerce platform. They want to identify the key factors driving sales and customer satisfaction to optimize operations and improve profitability. Through implementing Business Intelligence, they can collect data from various sources such as sales transactions, customer feedback, website analytics, and inventory management systems. Using Business Intelligence tools and techniques, the company can analyze this data to identify patterns, trends, and correlations. For instance, they may discover that certain products have higher sales volumes during specific seasons or that customers who purchase a particular item are more likely to return for future purchases. They may also uncover insights about customer demographics, preferences, and behavior, effectively helping them tailor marketing campaigns and product offerings to target specific segments. With this information, the retail company can make informed decisions regarding inventory management, pricing strategies, marketing campaigns, and store layouts.

What does Business Intelligence (BI) Analyst do?

A Business Intelligence (BI) Analyst plays a crucial role in this process by utilizing various tools, frameworks, and techniques to extract actionable information from complex datasets. They work closely with stakeholders to identify business needs, develop analytical strategies, and present findings in a clear and meaningful manner. BI Analysts translate data into valuable insights that empower organizations to optimize performance, identify trends, and make data-driven decisions.

Career Path / Career Roadmap of a BI Analyst

To become a Business Intelligence (BI) Analyst, there is no specific educational qualification required. However, having a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Information Systems, Data Science, Statistics, Mathematics, or Business Administration can be advantageous. It is beneficial to possess a strong understanding of data analysis, statistics, database management, and business processes. Proficiency in data visualization tools and programming languages can prove to be valuable. Practical experience, hands-on projects, and obtaining relevant certifications can further enhance your skills and prospects as a BI Analyst.

The following represents the career path or career roadmap of a BI analyst :

BI Analyst Career Path Career Roadmap

  • BI Analyst : The journey begins as a BI Analyst, where professionals with 2 to 4 years of experience enter the field. In this role, they develop foundational data analysis and reporting skills using tools like SQL, Excel, and data visualization software. BI Analysts analyze data to generate insights, create visualizations, and support decision-making processes.
  • Senior BI Analyst : After gaining experience as a BI Analyst, professionals progress to become Senior BI Analysts. With 2 to 4 additional years of experience, they deepen their analytical expertise and expand their toolkit. Senior BI Analysts utilize advanced analytics techniques, statistical tools (e.g., R, Python), and data modeling to uncover deeper insights. They also work on complex data projects, collaborating with cross-functional teams to provide strategic recommendations.
  • Lead BI Analyst : With 5 to 7 years of experience, professionals can transition into Lead BI analysts. As Lead BI Analysts, they not only excel in data analysis but also take on leadership responsibilities. They manage teams of analysts, oversee data-driven strategies, and ensure the successful implementation of BI initiatives. Additionally, they play a key role in guiding and mentoring junior team members.
  • Principal BI Analyst : With 8 to 10 years of experience, individuals can reach the level of Principal BI Analyst. This senior-level position involves managing multiple teams, spearheading high-level strategic initiatives, and driving the organization’s data strategy. Principal BI Analysts possess a deep understanding of data management, including data integration, data quality, and master data management. They may also have expertise in big data technologies and cloud platforms, enabling them to leverage emerging technologies for enhanced insights.
  • Director of Business Intelligence : The pinnacle of a Business Intelligence Analyst’s career is to become a Director of Business Intelligence. This role requires a significant amount of experience, typically exceeding 10 years. Directors of Business Intelligence need to have a holistic understanding of business operations, technology trends, and analytics strategies. They should have a track record of successful data-driven initiatives and be proficient in stakeholder management, budgeting, and strategic decision-making.

The career path of a BI Analyst offers a rewarding journey for professionals interested in data analysis, technology, and business strategy. Starting as a BI Analyst , individuals progress to become Senior BI Analysts, Lead BI Analysts, and Principal BI Analysts and potentially reach top leadership positions as Director of Business Intelligence. Throughout this path, BI Analysts gain expertise in various tools, frameworks, and techniques, enabling them to extract valuable insights from data and drive informed decision-making. As businesses increasingly rely on data-driven strategies, the demand for skilled Business Intelligence Analysts continues to grow, making it an exciting and promising career choice.

' src=

Ajitesh Kumar

Leave a reply cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • Search for:

Recent Posts

  • Data Analytics for Car Dealers: Actionable Insights
  • Unemployment Data & Actionable Insights Examples
  • Insurance & Linear Regression Model Example
  • Chi-square test – Formula, Concepts, Examples
  • Text Clustering Real-World Applications: Examples

Recent Comments

' src=

You can use citation styles as appropriate. Thank you Kumar, Ajitesh. "Two independent samples t-tests: Formula & Examples." Vitalflux.com, 22…

As the claim is made about average number of days spent on vacation is greater than or equal to 5…

' src=

Very informative and well-articulated post. Thank you

' src=

How can we cite this article

' src=

Hello. May I ask, the problem states that that the average number of days on vacation is more than or…

Business Intelligence Roadmap

Key principles for a business intelligence roadmap.

Plotting a clear route for Business Intelligence & Analytics can help you lift your organization to a higher level. A route and a dot on the horizon that everyone can see and understand. It’s also important to be able to continually course-correct as you go. In our experience, the agility of Business Intelligence teams and information products leaves something to be desired from time to time. In this agile environment, BI itself has to be agile too, of course.

  • Make a BI roadmap in 4 steps
  • Choose the right BI tools
  • Top 7 BI trends of 2023
  • Hire an expert BI consultant

Business Intelligence Training

  • Business Intelligence book

Key principles

In order to make a successful roadmap, these key principles should be adhered to:

  • A clear vision on Business Intelligence & Data Science.
  • A clear link to the company strategy and IT strategy.
  • There are no arguments about the current situation (IST).
  • The desired result is ambitious, but realistic.
  • The road map plots the route from the current situation to the desired one.

Making a sound BI roadmap in 4 steps

Making a Business Intelligence roadmap is a matter of consistently following four steps:

  • Take stock of your current situation. Based on interviews, automated surveys, and analysis of your documentation and systems, map your current situation.
  • Our BI consultants will help you create and test a vision for Business Analytics. We won’t just consider your company strategy and IT strategy, we’ll also zoom in on the company’s processes, products, and customers.
  • During one or more workshops, we, the information managers, and the direction (and any other possible stakeholders) will put the dot on the horizon. In a presentation, we will develop and clarify the desired results of the roadmap.
  • Based on the results of the previous steps, one or more BI programs will be started. These will be divided into several projects with a (resource) planning.

The complete project of developing a roadmap may take several weeks to months, depending on the size of your organization and the complexity of your business model.

Step one to a Business Analytics roadmap: Baseline measurement

You can’t make a Business Analytics roadmap without a baseline measurement telling you where you are now when it comes to your Business Intelligence maturity level. Our proven BI model can be used to determine your current position (the baseline measurement), and from there you can place the dot on the horizon, which is where you want to get to.

It’s important to realize that there is a very strong correlation between the maturity level of BI and the success of Business Analytics. This is a cornerstone of our BI training course .

Prepare for the future with a BI roadmap

Making a Business Intelligence roadmap isn’t as easy as it may sound. There are many factors to consider:

  • Who do you involve when plotting out the BI roadmap? Who do you leave out?
  • What principles should you use for the Business Intelligence roadmap?
  • Does the organization have a clear vision for Business Analytics?
  • How should you deal with the diversity of BI tools and software?
  • What are the prospects for funding from the business side for the foreseeable future?

There are also Data Science angles to consider. No organization can afford to ignore these any longer. The experienced Business Intelligence specialists from Passionned Group are eager to help you with BI advice and Business Intelligence training .

Business Intelligence vision

You can’t plan a BI roadmap without a coherent Business Intelligence vision. But what does that mean, exactly? And why shouldn’t you start using QlikView or Tableau Dashboards right away? The core of BI vision is about getting the right data and information about a specific process to the right place. In this way, it can immediately generate added value for the decision-makers in your company from a strategic, tactical, and operational point of view.

Without this vision, you can make the prettiest BI roadmap ever made, but you will never reach your destination. You’re missing the dot on the horizon. Here’s an example of a clear BI vision: “In 2020, we want to work and make data-driven decisions company-wide. We’ll use data analytics in every step of the process to improve continually.” Management, and all the teams, obviously need to embrace and co-sign this vision.

Change management and Business Analytics

If you want to successfully make changes to improve the maturity level of Business Analytics, you can’t escape change management. It’s tempting to think that technology is a silver bullet. Our advisors and consultants have a lot of experience with change management, besides having a lot BI expertise. They know the process and organizational sides of Business Analytics.

Why choose Passionned Group?

✓ Our Business Intelligence specialists know the tricks of the trade. ✓ We work with a fixed price: no surprises! ✓ We are 100% vendor-independent . We serve your interests, and yours alone. ✓ Over 200 satisfied clients served!

Choose quality and contact us

Are you curious about what we can do for your organization, or do you want help making a Business Intelligence roadmap and vision? Contact us freely for more information or make an appointment. We’re eager to surprise you with our BI expertise.

About Passionned Group

Passionned Group has been the specialist in data-driven working, KPIs, processes, AI and data science for over 15 years. Already helped more than customers to their satisfaction.

Overall customer rating

Premium experience.

  • seasoned consultants: 15+ years
  • clever approach: people & tech
  • we are 100% vendor neutral

We work for healthcare providers, retailers, higher education, the government and the financial sector, among others. Check out our client stories here.

Latest news

Harness the power of Generative AI, but remain critical and vigilant AI is a systems technology with a huge impact Every euro you invest in technology, you also invest in people

BI Roadmap Specialists

DICK POUW MBA

Senior Consultant and CIO

DAAN VAN BEEK MSc

Author of 'Data Science for Decision Makers & Data Professionals'

drs. WOUTER HUISMAN

Management Consultant Business Intelligence Roadmaps

Order here our unique Data Science handbook - Big Data, AI, BI & Data Science combined

You May Also Like

You are here:

Give your opinion on this product, article or service

How to cite this article?

Pouw, D. (2023), Business Intelligence Roadmap. Consulted on [insert date here], from https://www.passionned.com/bi/roadmap/

Would you like to link to this article? You can do so as follows:

A selection of our customers

Become a customer with us now

Do you also want to become a customer of ours? We are happy to help you with Business Intelligence roadmaps or other things that will make you smarter.

Contact me directly

  • Harness the power of Generative AI, but remain critical and vigilant
  • AI is a systems technology with a huge impact
  • Every euro you invest in technology, you also invest in people

Blog about Intelligent organizations

Compare all BI tools with our Independent BI & Analytics Guide™ 2023

Other resources

  • Data Science book
  • The SMART KPI Toolkit 2023
  • Knowledge base
  • Passionned Academy

Contact data

Passionned Group 77 Water St New York, 10005 USA

Office: +1 646 4536 499

Always stay informed, follow us on social media

Think Data, Think Passionned™

banner-in1

  • Business intelligence and Visualization

Top Business Intelligence Careers To Know In 2023

Home Blog Business intelligence and Visualization Top Business Intelligence Careers To Know In 2023

Play icon

Business Intelligence (BI) comprises a career field that supports organizations to make driven decisions by offering valuable insights. Business Intelligence is closely knitted to the field of data science since it leverages information acquired through large data sets to deliver insightful reports. Companies utilize different approaches to deal with data in order to extract information from structured, semi-structured, or unstructured data sets. Business Intelligence is one such approach that helps professionals to extract valuable information from structured data.

With the industry being at the center of rapid tech advancements, business intelligence careers are on the rise to fuel organizations with skilled individuals. If you, too, wish to be a part of this transformation with business intelligence, we recommend you to check out Business Intelligence and Visualization online course, which will help you to scale to greater heights in this field!

Let’s navigate through this guide to know the prospects in a BI career and all the relevant information about job opportunities, average salaries, potential job growth, and the future of this discipline.

Business Intelligence Career Path Outlook

Like most careers in the tech field, the business intelligence career outlook is very bright and progressive. Professionals in business intelligence are highly paid and get lucrative salary packages along with perks. BI career path has various segments, and individuals can choose which BI career they want to pursue. Some can become analysts, scientists, and consultants, while others can pursue engineers to advance their BI careers. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics  projects an 11% growth of business analysts within the years 2020 to 2030, implying the skyrocketing growth of BI careers through the years. As a result, all companies need data professionals to handle, evaluate, analyze, and gather data to extract valuable information from it. Business intelligence, thus, is a highly progressive career path.

Why BI is Crucial to Businesses in 2023? 

Business intelligence consists of techniques, tools, strategies, and applications to analyze and present a visual representation of the data that is easily understandable and user readable. This information helps management make better decisions and gain competitive advantages with predictive analytical capabilities. 

Following the growth of organizations opting to strengthen their digital presence, data influx has seen rapid growth in the past few years. With so much data at hand, companies are efficiently leveraging it to obtain insightful figures, statistics, and facts to make data-driven decisions. 

Business intelligence is the key to unlocking all these opportunities!

Let’s explore how business intelligence is fueling organizations to strengthen their process across domains.

Understands consumers

Leveraging customer data, business intelligence helps marketers to track customer tastes, preferences, and buying patterns. This helps companies to develop products and services according to the customer needs. Companies use the power of BI in taking the customer segmentation approach, which allows marketers to develop new products according to the categories of what they buy, when they buy, how often they buy, and so on.

Actionable insights

It is important to make business decisions after analyzing facts and data. Business intelligence is a source of extracting information to make informed business decisions. It allows marketers to evaluate the cart abandonment rate and analyze the reasons for doing so, creating better strategies to target prevailing concerns.

Improved efficiency and increased revenue

A robust business intelligence approach increases the efficiency of the organizational processes and the company's revenue. It empowers the organization's overall performance by making important information available to all departments. BI also helps in determining sales vulnerabilities, getting regular customer feedback, and being better than its competitors, which in turn increases the revenue of the company.

Access to real-time data

BI helps organizations to retrieve and act upon real-time data that allows the management to tackle errors related to information and data. It prepares critical reports minutely and reduces potential errors. Real-time data enables marketers to look after organizational health, identify and solve operational inefficiencies, closely monitor market situations, etc.

Stronger marketing efforts

Business intelligence aids marketers in data-driven campaigns, improving ROI. It enables analysis of crucial metrics like revenue, profit margins, employee productivity, sales reports, and department performance. Strategic campaign planning based on thorough background checks enhances marketing outcomes.

Identify market trends

BI allows marketers to utilize data from external sources to identify sales patterns and locate the areas that have the potential to have high-profit margins. The factual data helps companies to analyze consumer information to identify new market trends. Today, social media plays an important role in identifying market trends and showcasing customers' tastes and preferences.

Top Business Intelligence Careers

Plenty of career opportunities in business intelligence show potential to become one of the top-paying jobs in the industry today. The job growth percentage is very impressive in the BI career. We recommend you register for the  Power BI training course brought to you by KnowledgeHut to prepare yourself for the competitive BI future. This will help you to have a general understanding and knowledge about the basic concepts of business intelligence that will be of immense importance in starting your career in this field.

Here is a list of the top business intelligence career:

Business Analyst

A business analyst is an entry-level job position for professionals in this field. Business analysts evaluate various business processes and keep track of business performance so that they can present ideas with scope for improvement. The extracted data will fuel the organization to enhance efficiency, reduce cost, increase revenue, and bring many other positive changes.

Average salary: USD 83,533/year

Business Intelligence Engineer

Business intelligence engineers must have a bachelor's degree in computer science or information technology. They are responsible for setting standards for various business intelligence tools and helping prepare data warehouse designs. They minutely analyze the results of the data warehouse and prepare reports about how they affect the revenue of an organization. 

Additionally, business intelligence engineers look after the proper storage of data so that they can be extracted later. Business intelligence engineers must have an analytical mind and the required skill set for data analysis.

Average salary: USD 94,859/year

Director of Analytics

Director analytics is one of the top positions in business intelligence, where the individual is responsible for overseeing the entire organizational data analytics strategies while keeping track of team performance. The director of analytics is one of the members of the management and leadership department of the organization. Their task mainly focuses on supervising and making necessary changes in the organizational processes. They make sure that the project is aligned with the business objectives.

Average salary: USD 144,150/year

Business Intelligence Developer

Business intelligence developers predominantly work on databases and constantly strive to improve IT solutions to enhance business processes. They supervise and test software programs to check the data processing. 

A business intelligence developer is also involved in database management which requires a knowledge of SQL queries. They assist in creating data models to generate accurate reports and also look after the flow of information within various departments in the organization.

Average salary: USD 92,998/year

Business Intelligence Lead

Business intelligence lead is a managerial-level job position where the BI professional manages and coordinates an entire team. The business intelligence lead aligns and arranges data to facilitate better reporting within the company.

They must possess an analytical mindset to attain business objectives while coordinating departmental needs. It can also be a technical job when the professional has to be equipped with the knowledge of programming languages like SQL.

Average salary: USD 161,727/year

Big Data Engineer

Big data engineers work with large amounts of data and structure various databases and warehouses. They should have a keen understanding of machine learning techniques that helps create architecture for big data platforms.

Big data engineers are also responsible for managing the team of data engineers and hence require a lot of patience and perseverance. They must possess good organizational skills to work effectively within a company.

Average salary: USD 132,838/year

Business Intelligence Architect

Business intelligence architects should be adaptive to organizational changes and possess an analytical mind. They are responsible for creating data structures and maintaining architectural documents that, in turn, help to clarify BI standards. 

Another important task of business intelligence architects is to stay updated with the BI tools and maintain the data storage infrastructure. BI architects also prepare the methods and frameworks to store necessary data.

Average salary: USD 115,553/year

Business Intelligence Manager

A business intelligence manager is in charge of managing the data engineers and scientists in the organization. It is a middle-level position and acts as a bridge between entry-level professionals and upper management. The business intelligence manager communicates the processes and new findings to the upper management and directs the feedback to the departments. 

Business intelligence managers generally communicate between the lower and upper-level management. They are very well aware of the tours and techniques data scientists and engineers use to strengthen BI strategies. 

Average salary: USD 109,000/year

Data Warehouse Engineer

Data warehouse engineer is an entry-level position that requires a minimum educational qualification of a bachelor's degree in computer science, information technology, or data science. They are in charge of designing and preparing an outline of databases for data warehousing analytics and reports. 

Data warehouse engineers perform technical tasks, prepare data reports and analyze databases as a part of their jobs, needing them to possess strong leadership skills and management abilities. 

Average salary: USD 106,843/year

Business Intelligence Consultant

Business intelligence consultant is a progressive career option for BI enthusiasts aiming to explore this expansive field by working across different organizational organs. Business intelligence consultants work on a client-to-client basis. They thoroughly analyze and review client data to find new opportunities and scope for improvement. 

Additionally, BI consultants prepare data collection and monitor the extracted information to derive informed business strategies. It is a dynamic job position as no clients are the same.

Average salary: USD 88,066/year

Top Certifications for a Career in BI

Here are some of the certifications that can help you have a bright career path in business intelligence:

  • Certified Business Intelligence Professional (CBIP)
  • Microsoft Certified: Power BI Data Analyst Associate
  • IBM Data Analyst Professional Certificate
  • SAS Certified Specialist: Visual Business Analytics Specialist
  • Tableau Certified Data Analyst
Unlock the Power of Data with our Data Scientist Certification Online ! Become a Data Scientist and gain the skills to analyze, interpret, and make data-driven decisions. Start your journey today!

Wrapping Up

In today’s day and age, BI careers are experiencing a high demand considering the consistent growth of the digital sphere and its resulting data influx. The need for skilled professionals with in-demand skills, especially in the IT sector, is no secret, and business intelligence is one of the inseparable parts of organizations. 

If you are interested in the technical field and are looking for options to have a prosperous career, consider signing up for the KnowledgeHut Business Intelligence and Visualization online course that will imbibe your skill set with in-demand BI skills and will increase your chances of getting into esteemed companies!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Business intelligence can work both ways- with and without coding. Some business visualization tools like Tableau require no coding, whereas some need coding. BI professionals should have a knowledge of programming languages so that they will be able to translate raw data into tangible solutions. 

A bachelor's degree in business intelligence, information technology, computer science, or any other related field is best for pursuing a career path in business intelligence. Such a degree enhances skills like management, data analytics, marketing, and technology, helping candidates to easily take over the role of efficient BI professionals.

Being a business intelligence professional can be challenging and stressful. This is because it is a dynamic role that involves working with huge amounts of data and extracting valuable information to make better, data-driven organizational decisions. 

Both business analysts and business intelligence analysts perform similar tasks, but the role of a business intelligence analyst is more specific. Hence, a business intelligence analyst earns slightly more than a business analyst.

Profile

Spandita Hati

Spandita is a dynamic content writer who holds a master's degree in Forensics but loves to play with words and dabble in digital marketing. Being an avid travel blogger, she values engaging content that attracts, educates and inspires. With extensive experience in SEO tools and technologies, her writing interests are as varied as the articles themselves. In her leisure, she consumes web content and books in equal measure.

Avail your free 1:1 mentorship session.

Something went wrong

Upcoming BI & Visualization Batches & Dates

Course advisor icon

Your Effective Roadmap To Implement A Successful Business Intelligence Strategy

Roadmap to implement a successful BI strategy by datapine

Table of Contents

1) What Is A Business Intelligence Strategy?

2) BI Strategy Benefits

3) Steps To Build Your BI Roadmap

4) How To Create A Business Intelligence Strategy

Odds are you know your business needs business intelligence (BI). Over the past 5 years, big data and BI became more than just data science buzzwords . Without real-time insight into their data, businesses remain reactive, miss strategic growth opportunities, lose their competitive edge, fail to take advantage of cost savings options, don’t ensure customer satisfaction… the list goes on. In response to this increasing need for data analytics, business intelligence software has flooded the market. With the benefits being numerous and the costs of not having good BI growing, it is easy to want to quickly adopt a solution.

Unfortunately, this approach could be disastrous. Investing in BI shouldn’t be taken lately. Whether you are starting from scratch, moving past spreadsheets, or looking to migrate to a new platform: you need a business intelligence strategy and roadmap in place. We previously discussed business intelligence for small businesses . Now we are going to take that a step further with the following 16 steps to a better business intelligence strategy. These steps are imperative for businesses, of all sizes, looking to successfully launch and manage their business intelligence.

What Is A Business Intelligence Strategy?

A business intelligence strategy refers to the process of implementing a BI system in your company. This includes defining the main stakeholders, assessing the situation, defining the goals, and finding the KPIs that will measure your efforts to achieve these goals.

You define the strategy in terms of vision, organization, processes, architecture, and solutions, and then draw a roadmap based on the assessment, the priority, and the feasibility.

Business intelligence implementation is not an easy task, as it requires a lot of preparation work beforehand, gathers many different actors, and will involve expenses. But the rewards outperform by far its costs, and it is well known that business intelligence ROI is real even if it is sometimes hard to quantify. The costs of not implementing it are more damaging, especially in the long term.

Benefits Of Implementing a BI Strategy

Applying business intelligence is important – but the way you do it matters just as much. This is why having a BI strategy roadmap is extremely important: no sailor ever threw their ship in the sea without a map, a telescope, and a compass. Think of your strategy just as that: defining the steps on your BI roadmap, following your goals as a compass to stay in the right direction, and investing and using the right tools to get a deep view of your information and understand it.

Having a BI strategy in place before implementing – or just selecting – a system lets you find the perfect match for your needs. It will also facilitate and unclutter the decision-making process, which usually is goal number one of BI. Among other things, a structured enterprise business intelligence strategy is important to: 

  • Make informed strategic decisions : Now more than ever, the amount of business data dealt with and stored gets way out of proportion to treat it manually – adding on top of that all of the unstructured data that needs to be processed first in order to be understood and later used. It takes time and knowledge to make the best out of such assets, as well as a solid planification. The information a business gathers is filled with precious insights that will help it measure its performance, understand its customers, identify competitive advantages, and much more. A planned BI strategy will point your business in the right direction to meet its goals by making strategic decisions based on real-time data. 
  • Save time and money: Thinking carefully about a BI roadmap will not only help you make better strategic decisions but will also save your business time and money. For instance, by having an established budget and plan you will avoid spending extra money by shooting in the dark when it comes to important decisions such as choosing which features you will pay for in BI software . Simultaneously, you will be saving a great deal of time by thinking everything through in advance. As you will see in this post, a BI strategy is not easy to implement, but you will reap the benefits in no time. 
  • Improved risk management: Another great benefit from implementing a strategy for BI is risk management. By thinking every step through in advance you avoid finding yourself in difficult situations that can make you lose money and time. Additionally, you can also spot weaknesses in your process and tackle them immediately. More on this point later!
  • Get a competitive advantage: Probably one of the most appealing benefits of business intelligence is the fact that it gives a competitive advantage. Taking the time to plan and organize an efficient BI strategy will skyrocket your business performance. In today's crowded business environment, everyone wants to work with data. But is not just about investing in the first tool you see, a successful BI system is all about thinking ahead. If you follow the right path you will step away from your competitors in no time.  

The benefits of business intelligence are numerous and undeniable; now you just need to get there and reap them! Let’s look at the top 16 steps to build a successful business intelligence roadmap. 

16 Steps on Your Business Intelligence Roadmap

As mentioned above, there are many benefits from implementing a BI system in your company. Once you identified the potential behind it, it is time to start planning its application. When thinking about BI we are not only talking about choosing an online data analysis tool . There are several other steps that need to be taken to ensure success. In this section of the post, we are going to see a business intelligence strategy example consisting of 16 steps that are fundamental for a successful BI implementation. Let's quick it off!

1. Go into the process with eyes wide open

When you have the right BI solutions , it is easy to identify trends, pitfalls, and opportunities early on. But implementing the right tool isn’t always easy. Actually, it usually isn’t. We are going to be honest here, even the best software needs some initial heavy lifting to maximize its potential. If you go in with the right mindset you will be prepared to address issues like complicated data problems, change management resistance, waning sponsorship, IT reluctance, and user adoption challenges. Reminding stakeholders, and yourself, of the pain points that necessitated it will encourage the process forward. It will be worth it.

2. Determine stakeholder objectives

Odds are everyone at your organization could benefit from increased data access and insights. That doesn’t mean they are all key stakeholders. Right off the bat, you must determine who your key stakeholders are. Then find out what they need: visible and vocal executive sponsorship is a must. Gathering and setting executive team expectations early is paramount. Then move past the executive team. They often don’t have the same front-line knowledge that other staff does. Collect and prioritize pain points and key performance indicators (KPIs) across the organization. They might not all make it into the initial rollout, but it is better to start big and rollback.

3. Choose a sponsor

While a business intelligence strategy should include multiple stakeholders, it is imperative to have a sponsor to spearhead the implementation. It may be tempting to place the Chief Information Officer (CIO) or Chief Technical Officer (CTO). This is usually not the best approach. It should be sponsored by an executive who has bottom-line responsibility, a broad picture of the organization’s strategy and goals, and knows how to translate the company mission into mission-focused KPIs.

CFOs and CMOs are good fits. They can govern the implementation with a documented business case and be responsible for changes in scope. Of course, whoever the chosen sponsor is, they will need to be in constant communication with the CIO/CTO. This brings us to the next step…

4. BI is not just a technology initiative

We are going to repeat ourselves a bit here. Because it is that important. To succeed, a deployment must have the support of key business areas, from the get-go. IT should be involved to ensure governance, knowledge transfer, data integrity, and the actual implementation. But every stakeholder and their respective business areas should also be involved throughout the process.

By involving a range of stakeholders you can ensure you cover the three broad classes of business intelligence users: strategic, tactical, and operational. These different users types will need customized solutions. Understanding who will use the data and for what purposes can show the type of information needed and its frequency, and help guide your decision-making.

The business as a whole must be willing to dedicate the necessary resources: staff, IT resources, costs, etc. BI implementation doesn’t just come out of the IT budget. The best business intelligence strategy lays out these resources in the beginning, with additional wiggle room.

5. Employ a Chief Data Officer (CDO)

Big data guru Bernard Marr wrote about The Rise of Chief Data Officers . In the article, he pointed to a pretty fascinating trend: “Experian has predicted that the CDO position will become a standard senior board-level role by 2020, bringing the conversation around data gathering, management, optimization, and security to the C-level.” We love that data is moving permanently into the C-Suite. While, like the CIO, the CDO probably shouldn’t be the main sponsor for BI implementation: they (or a similar role) are a great key stakeholder to involve. They will also most likely own the project after the initial implementation is complete.

6. Assess the current situation

As we have already stated: usually a deployment isn’t quick or easy. There is a lot of work to do on the front end. One of the biggest sections of a business intelligence roadmap should be assessing the current situation. Now that you have all the right stakeholders at the table the next step is analyzing the current software stack, and the processes and organizational structures surrounding it (or lack thereof). Find out what is working, as you don’t want to totally scrap an already essential report or process. Find a way to integrate it into the new strategy, or you will have upset employees. On the flip side, document everything that isn’t working. What data analysis questions are you unable to currently answer? Which processes are inefficient or broken?

On top of all this, you need to compile which data sources you currently have and how they are being stored. Decide which are necessary to your business intelligence strategy. This should also include creating a plan for data storage services . Are the data sources going to remain disparate? Or does building a data warehouse make sense for your organization?

As with all these steps, both IT and the various business stakeholders should be involved throughout this hefty step.

7. Define a budget

Once you have defined the current situation of the business, it is time to think about a budget. Developing an accurate budget is a key step in the process of building a successful business intelligence strategy. Budgeting allows you to smartly allocate your resources to make sure you have everything you need to kick it off. For example, as mentioned in a point above, you need to think about expenses such as hiring a Chief Data Officer, training instances for your employees, and of course about what kind of software or system you will choose to invest in. 

When it comes to business intelligence tools, there are many options in the market that offer a range of BI features that enable companies of all sizes to leverage their data. In most cases, their pricing varies depending on the size of the company and its needs. This is why it is important to have a clear understanding of what your specific requirements are and how much money you have available before going on the search for one of these solutions. Like this, you will be able to compare vendors and choose the one that is best for you.   

8. Think of security, privacy, and compliance 

Before going all-in with data collection, cleaning, and analysis, it is important to consider the topics of security, privacy, and most importantly, compliance. Businesses deal with massive amounts of data from their users that can be sensitive and needs to be protected. Massive data breaches are a constant topic of concern and it has led to the implementation of various legislations to regulate it. For this reason, implementing measures to stay compliant with data privacy regulations is a must when building your BI roadmap strategy. 

In order to ensure privacy and protection, you also need to think about security. When dealing with big data sets choosing secure storage locations is key. But, making sure your data is secure doesn’t necessarily mean you are being compliant. While privacy and security are tight to each other, there are other ways in which data can be misused and you need to make sure you are carefully considering this when building your strategies. 

For this purpose, you can think about a data governance strategy. Essentially, data governance is a collection of processes that ensure the efficient use of data. It establishes clear responsibilities when it comes to data management and it helps ensure quality and security. Here it is important to understand that a governance strategy will not help you make better decisions, but the right ones. 

9. Clean the data

Clean data in, clean analytics out. It’s that simple. Cleaning your data may not be quite as simple, but it will ensure the success of your BI. It is crucial to guarantee solid data quality management , as it will help you maintain the cleanest data possible for better operational activities and decision-making made relying on that data.

Indeed, every year low-quality data is estimated to cost over $9.7 million to American businesses only, as it impacts the bottom-line, the productivity, and ultimately the overall ROI. Of course, one shouldn’t become overly obsessed with 100% pure data quality, as perfection doesn’t exist, especially because the purpose is not to create subjective notions of what high-quality data is or isn’t. The goal is to boost the ROI of your department – and any other – that are relying on this data.

10. Develop a “Data Dictionary”

With Agile development, extensive documentation has become a faux-pas. Large data dictionaries can be cumbersome and hard to keep updated. That said, for business intelligence to succeed there needs to be at least a consensus on data definitions and business calculations. The lack of agreement on definitions is a widespread problem in companies today. For example, finance and sales may define “gross margin” differently, leading to their numbers not matching. To nip this in the bud, get all the SMEs at the same table to hammer the definitions out. Then for knowledge transfer choose the repository, best suited for your organization, to host this information.

11. Ensure data literacy 

Paired to a well-thought data dictionary, another action you need to take to ensure your business intelligence strategy is successful is the democratization of data across the entire organization. Implementing a data-driven culture in your business can bring several benefits, but before you can reach this goal it is necessary to think about data literacy. 

Gartner defines data literacy as “the ability to read, write and communicate data in context, including an understanding of data sources and constructs, analytical methods and techniques applied, and the ability to describe the use case, application and resulting value.” It basically means understanding and being able to work with data. 

In order to ensure data literacy, you can first assess the level of knowledge of your employees. According to Gartner, a good starting point is to identify fluent and native data speakers that can serve as mediators for inexperienced groups. Then, you can look for areas where “communication barriers result in failing to use data to its full business potential” and use them as a baseline to improve. With all this information in hand, you can think about training opportunities such as workshops, seminars, and others. 

12. Identify key performance indicators (KPIs)

KPIs are measurable values that show how effectively a company is achieving its business objectives. They sit at the core of a good BI strategy. KPIs indicate areas businesses are on the right track and where improvements are needed. When implementing a BI strategy, it is crucial to consider the company’s individual strategy and align KPIs to the company’s objectives. It may be tempting to create KPIs for everything. This can be a runaway train. It is best to start with the most important KPIs; then create standards and governance with KPI examples in mind. You can always expand on these later.

13. Choose the right tool/partner for your business

At step 13 we finally get to choose a BI software/partner. Yes, you are this far along in your business intelligence roadmap and you don’t even have a tool yet. By preparing properly through steps 1-12 you will be best suited to find the right tool and implement it successfully. During this process, you will need to choose and perform a cloud vs on-premise comparison . You also need to make sure to choose a solution that can start small but easily scale as your company and needs grow. Look for flexible solutions that address the needs of all your user. Take advantage of free trials , and don’t rush through this step!

14. Rely on interactive data visualizations 

Although it is not a specific step, using intuitive data visualizations still goes into the BI strategy framework as an important element to consider when choosing the right tool for your company. For decades now, data analytics has been considered a segregated task. People often think of numbers and infinite excel sheets that are almost impossible to understand. With this issue in mind, the BI industry has developed multiple solutions that rely on data visualizations to give a more friendly and intuitive approach to business analytics. 

For instance, BI dashboard software such as datapine offers the possibility to generate interactive dashboards in real-time without the need for any technical knowledge. Like this, dashboards become invaluable tools for the efficient functioning of your BI strategy as they allow average users to stay connected with data for their decision-making process. Let’s see this with an example of a sales dashboard . 

A sales dashboard focused on high-level metrics such as revenue, profits, costs, incremental sales, accumulated revenue, up/cross-sell rates, etc.

**click to enlarge**

Working as a key element in a business intelligence reporting strategy, this sales dashboard is the perfect visual tool to understand the performance of the sales department. With metrics such as the number of sales, revenue, profit, and costs, c-level executives, managers, and sales VPs can get at a glance information about their goals completion and other relevant insights regarding their strategies. This dashboard can also be embedded into your system, making it easier for any relevant stakeholder to access the data. 

15. Think about possible roadblocks and find solutions 

By now you should have a clear understanding of the processes and measures you need to take for the successful implementation of your business intelligence strategy. But, as with any other business scenario, it is not without problems. In order to avoid being caught by surprise, a good practice when building a BI roadmap is to think of possible roadblocks. 

By identifying roadblocks such as employees training, data storage, or any others, you are capable of anticipating possible issues and facing them with efficient solutions. Of course, it is impossible to have a crystal ball to foresee all the problems that could arise along the way. However, it is possible to identify some potential drawbacks and apply risk management practices in advance.

16. Pursue a phased approach

Rome wasn’t built in a day: neither will your BI. A successful BI strategy takes an iterative approach. Think “actionable” and take baby steps. Choose a few KPIs and build a few business dashboards as examples. Gather feedback. Repeat again with new releases every few weeks. Continuously ask yourself what is working and what stakeholders are benefiting.

A good BI roadmap doesn’t have an end date. Your organization should be invested in it for the long term. You should be continually measuring and refining your processes, data and reports. Don’t let it become stagnate: continually raise the bar.

How To Create A Business Intelligence Strategy

As we have seen all along with this article, there’s a lot to consider when you want to create and implement a new BI strategy. Let’s summarize here all that you need to think about beforehand:

  • Assess the situation: analyze the organizational structure, processes, and software stack – or the absence of such. Find out what is working and what isn’t, to save you time on already functioning processes. Ask yourself the right business questions and define the strategic goals you want to achieve.
  • Building the BI roadmap: establishing the steps to follow is like looking at your itinerary before hitting the road. You are aware of everything that will come up and more prepared in front of surprises and problems to handle.
  • Defining your team: from the head of BI to the business analyst to the developer, you need a solid team with clear roles that will be able to carry out the different tasks on your roadmap.
  • Organizing your BI system: the data warehouse, the data sources, the software drawing out insights… There’s a lot of thinking behind this that shouldn’t be neglected, as it will be your central tool to navigate your data and bring out insightful analytics. Once you know where you go and with whom, you shouldn’t pick the mount at random!
  • Get ready to hit the road, Jack! As one would say, you are now ready to rumble! You have all the keys in your hands to start the first step of your roadmap and launch your new BI strategy. Good luck with your business intelligence implementation!

The power a strong BI strategy can bring to your business is compelling – if done correctly. With these 16 steps, our business intelligence roadmap example may look a bit daunting; but without them, you will end up with an even bigger headache. When done right, BI implementation is the gift that keeps giving. You just need to stick to your business intelligence strategy to get there.

If you are ready to implement business intelligence in your business then try our BI software 14-days for free !

Qlik Sense – QlikView

Business Intelligence Roadmap

Business intelligence roadmap refers to all the steps you undertake in order to implement business intelligence in your company. It goes all the way to diving in the BI process, defining the stakeholders and main actors, to assessing the situation, defining the goals and finding the performance indicators that will help you measure your efforts to achieve these goals. You define the strategy in terms of vision, organization, processes, architecture and solutions, and then draw a roadmap based on the assessment, the priority and the feasibility. Here are the steps for Business Intelligence Roadmap ;

Business Intelligence Roadmap

Go into the process

When you have the right business intelligence roadmap, it is easy to identify trends, pitfalls and opportunities early on. But implementing the right solution isn’t always easy. Actually, it usually isn’t. We are going to be honest here, even the best software needs some initial heavy lifting to maximize its potential. If you go in with the right mindset you will be prepared to address issues like complicated data problems, change management resistance, waning sponsorship, IT reluctance and user adoption challenges. Reminding stakeholders, and yourself, of the pain points that necessitated it will encourage the process forward. It will be worth it.

Determine stakeholder objectives

Odds are everyone at your organization could benefit from increased data access and insights. That doesn’t mean they are all key stakeholders. Right off the bat you must determine who your key stakeholders are. Then find out what they need: visible and vocal executive sponsorship is a must. Gathering and setting executive team expectations early is paramount. Then move past the executive team. They often don’t have the same front-line knowledge that other staff do. Collect and prioritize pain points and key performance indicators (KPIs) across the organization. They might not all make it into the initial rollout, but it is better to start big and roll back.

Choose a sponsor

While a business intelligence strategy should include multiple stakeholders, it is imperative to have a sponsor to spearhead the implementation. It may be tempting to place the Chief Information Officer (CIO) or Chief Technical Officer (CTO). This is usually not the best approach. It should be sponsored by an executive who has bottom-line responsibility, a broad picture of the organization’s strategy and goals and knows how to translate the company mission into mission focused KPIs.

CFOs and CMOs are good fits. They can govern the implementation with a documented business case and be responsible for changes in scope. Of course, whoever the chosen sponsor is, they will need to be in

BI is not just a technology initiative

We are going to repeat ourselves a bit here. Because it is  that  important. To succeed, a deployment must have the support of key business areas, from the get-go. IT should be involved to ensure governance, knowledge transfer, data integrity, and the actual implementation. But every stakeholder and their respective business areas should also be involved throughout the process.

By involving a range of stakeholders you can ensure you cover the three broad classes of business intelligence users: strategic, tactical and operational. These different users types will need customized solutions. Understanding who will use the data and for what purposes can show the type of information needed and its frequency, and help guide your decision making.

The business as a whole must be willing to dedicate the necessary resources: staff, IT resources, costs, etc. BI implementation doesn’t just come out of the IT budget. The best business intelligence roadmap lays out these resources in the beginning, with additional wiggle room.

Employ a Chief Data Officer (CDO)

Big data guru Bernard Marr  wrote about   The Rise of Chief Data Officers . In the article, he pointed to a pretty fascinating trend: “Experian has predicted that the CDO position will become a standard senior board level role by 2020, bringing the conversation around data gathering, management, optimization, and security to the C-level.” We love that data is moving permanently into the C-Suite. While, like the CIO, the CDO probably shouldn’t be the main sponsor for BI implementation: they (or a similar role) are a great key stakeholder to involve. They will also most likely own the project after the initial implementation is complete.

Assess the current situation

As we have already stated: usually a deployment isn’t quick or easy. There is a lot of work to do on the front end. One of the biggest sections on a business intelligence roadmap should be assessing the current situation. Now that you have all the right stakeholders at the table the next step is analyzing the current software stack, and the processes and organizational structures surrounding it (or lack thereof). Find out what is working, as you don’t want to totally scrap an already essential report or process. Find a way to integrate it into the new strategy, or you will have upset employees. On the flip side, document everything that isn’t working. What data analysis questions are you unable to currently answer? Which processes are inefficient or broken?

On top of all this you need to compile which data sources you currently have and how they are being stored. Decide which are necessary to your business intelligence strategy. This should also include creating a plan for  data storage services . Are the data sources going to remain disparate? Or does building a data warehouse make sense for your organization?

As with all these steps, both IT and the various business stakeholders should be involved throughout this hefty step.

Clean the data

Clean data in, clean analytics out. It’s that simple. Cleaning your data may not be quite as simple, but it will ensure the success of your BI. It is crucial to guarantee a solid data quality management, as it will help you maintain the cleanest data possible for better operational activities and decision-making made relying on that data.

Indeed, every year low-quality data is estimated to cost over  $9.7 million  to American business only, as it impacts the bottom-line, the productivity and ultimately the overall ROI. Of course, one shouldn’t become overly obsessed with 100% pure data quality, as perfection doesn’t exists, and especially because the purpose is not to create subjective notions of what high quality data is or isn’t. The goal is to boost the ROI of your department – and any other – that are relying on this data.

Develop a “Data Dictionary”

With Agile development, extensive documentation has become a faux-pas. Large data dictionaries can be cumbersome and hard to keep updated. That said, for business intelligence to succeed there needs to be at least a consensus on data definitions and business calculations. The lack of agreement on definitions is a widespread problem in companies today. For example, finance and sales may define “gross margin” differently, leading to their numbers not matching. To nip this in the bud, get all the SMEs at the same table to hammer the definitions out. Then for knowledge transfer choose the repository, best suited for your organization, to host this information.

Identify key performance indicators (KPIs)

KPIs are measurable values that show how effectively a company is achieving their business objectives. They sit at the core of a good BI strategy. KPIs indicate areas businesses are on the right track and where improvements are needed. When implementing a BI strategy, it is crucial to consider the company’s individual strategy and align KPIs to company’s objectives. It may be tempting to create KPIs for everything. This can be a runaway train. It is best to start with the most important KPIs; then create standards and governance with  KPI examples  in mind. You can always expand on these later.

Choose the right tool / partner for your business

At step 10 we finally get to choosing a BI software/partner. Yes, you are this far along in your business intelligence roadmap and you don’t even have a tool yet. By preparing properly through steps 1-9 you will be best suited to find the right tool and implement it successfully. During this process you will need to choose and perform a cloud vs on-premise comparison. You also need to make sure to choose a solution that can start small but easily scale as your company and needs grow. Look for flexible solutions that address the needs of all your user. Take advantage of  free trials , and don’t rush through this step!

Business Intelligence Roadmap with phased approach

Rome wasn’t built in a day: neither will your BI. A successful BI strategy takes an iterative approach. Think “actionable” and take baby steps. Choose a few KPIs and build a few  business dashboards  as examples. Gather feedback. Repeat again with new releases every few weeks. Continuously ask yourself what is working and what stakeholders are benefiting.

A good BI roadmap doesn’t have an end date. Your organization should be invested in it for the long term. You should be continually measuring and refining your processes, data and reports. Don’t let it become stagnate: continually raise the bar.

Try for free

Business Intelligence Roadmaps: How To Plan For BI Outcomes

Business Intelligence Roadmaps: How To Plan For BI Outcomes

The benefits of using a BI roadmap

Examples of business intelligence roadmaps, do i really need a dedicated business intelligence tool, get your bi strategy on the road with airfocus .

Did you know that your business has a secret weapon?

It’s true. And while every business shares this particular weapon, it’s entirely unique to each and every one. 

Use it incorrectly and it won’t be of much use to you, but leverage it in just the right way and you can transform your organization’s results and fortunes. 

Put simply, Business Intelligence refers to the collection, collation, and analysis of those countless bits of data that flow in and out of your business every day. This means everything , from the data in your CRM system to the details of every transaction on your website to the behavioral analytics in your app. 

Every action your business, and its customers , leaves a digital footprint. BI is about collecting all of these and making them digestible by systems that analyze and visualize the data to improve business decision -making and, eventually, outcomes.

But how can you ensure you’re using your BI insights correctly when data is so fast-moving? How do you introduce real structure into something which is by nature so nebulous?

Here’s how.

BI roadmaps

Make product management easy

airfocus modular platform

.css-uphcpb{position:absolute;left:0;top:-87px;} Introducing: The Business Intelligence roadmap

Wrangling all of your BI insights — without giving yourself a migraine — might sound like a tall order, but it’s much easier with a Business Intelligence roadmap . 

A Business Intelligence roadmap helps key stakeholders to track and visualize all of your BI data across organizational silos , over time. A roadmap like this will allow at-a-glance assessment of exactly where BI is being leveraged within your organization to maximize performance and amplify outcomes. 

Speaking of outcomes , that’s one point of difference with Business Intelligence roadmaps vs. other business roadmaps you might have come across. Why? Because a Business Intelligence roadmap focuses not on individual features (as is the case with a product roadmap ), but instead on the desired outcomes and business goals of your company’s BI strategy .

The Key Performance Indicators you set when building your Business Intelligence roadmap will influence the areas that your Business Intelligence team will focus on with a view to delivering specific outcomes. These will differ depending on the organization but might include data-driven outcomes such as:

A month-on-month increase in app users or downloads

Reduce returns rate

Identify seasonal purchasing trends

Monthly sales by segment

… and countless more

BI roadmaps

With definitions done and dusted, let’s move on to the reasons why your organization might choose to implement a Business Intelligence roadmap. 

A single source of truth for your entire business

You’re likely well aware of the dangers of siloed teams within a business, and without a Business Intelligence roadmap, these issues can get even worse. With a roadmap in place, you can launch coordinated cross-team efforts to target Key Performance Indicators, calendar-based milestones , and specific BI goals from a single shared location .

Better ROI from your BI teams

It’s likely you already have some level of BI in operation within your organization — even if that’s something as simple as tracking sales or website visitors. But, without this data being shared and analyzed, it’s not delivering as much value as it could. And neither are the employees managing it. 

Of course, another benefit here is that these employees will feel more job satisfaction from the work they do, too. After all, they’ll be able to see directly how their hard work translates to achieving business goals.

See airfocus in action

Make better, data-driven decisions.

Making group decisions in a business is always tricky, but with a Business Intelligence roadmap in front of you, it’s far easier to justify strategic shifts. 

This is especially true for time-based KPIs, like month-on-month changes, because they’re easy to track on the roadmap almost at a glance. As the saying goes, the numbers don’t lie — and a BI roadmap can give you a plan to find those actionable insights and, well, act on them. 

Stay reactive to changes

If there’s one thing that’s constant in business, it’s change . But when change happens unexpectedly, it can throw a wrench into the works of any project. 

A robust BI roadmap will empower your organization to use historical data-driven trends to prepare for any possible future. There’ll still be curveballs, naturally, but the agility of a roadmap means you can shift things around and stay reactive whatever life throws your way. 

BI roadmaps

Now that the definitions and benefits of having a BI roadmap in place are pretty clear let’s take a look at some best-case examples. Learning from the experience of other businesses in similar situations will save you time and effort. Trust us — it’s a good idea. We’ve also added a few examples of complementary BI tools to help get you started.

Datapipe offers enterprise-grade SaaS BI tools, from data visualization to dashboards and SQL queries. Their 16-step overview of how to go about building a BI roadmap and strategy covers everything from getting into the right mindset to firming up a budget and choosing tools. 

Practically everyone knows Tableau, one of the top BI analytics solutions on the market. Their team has compiled a blueprint for developing and implementing a successful BI strategy . This version is more high-level but tackles the equally important implementation aspect of the strategy. Even the best strategy will fall flat if executed poorly. 

Altexsoft is an award-winning technology consulting firm. Their approach to your BI strategy development includes great advice on BI Maturity models and architectures. Similar to the more generic crawl, walk, run approach, the BI maturity model creates a roadmap for progress over time. You can’t reach BI maturity overnight, so it's a good idea to start simply and plan for progression. 

In addition, if you haven’t considered your architecture and how everything hangs together upfront, your BI strategy is much more likely to fail. Integration at the architecture level is equally as important as integration at the software level.

So, that covers the high-level “why and how” of BI strategies. For some detail on BI tool options, take a look at Finereport’s overview, with great insights on selecting tools, prototyping, and building a team . This article runs you through what you will need from a BI tool, the key reasons to prototype, and which roles to select to build your team.

Finally, Roadmunk offers customized roadmapping tools for BI initiatives. Their article stresses that it’s critical to ensure your entire business is onboard and aligned with your strategy. Roadmunk takes you through how to prevent communication silos and ensure that your strategy can be easily integrated into your existing tech stack.

The short and simple answer is yes. Yes, you do . And not just because airfocus specializes in BI tools.

Using a selection of different tools that may or may not integrate into your current ecosystem is not an ideal solution. This approach will probably cost you time and money — unnecessarily. 

In Agile environments, silos are efficiency drags. From BI strategies down to unit tests, the more open and streamlined your documentation, the better performance.

Let’s take a look at a few good reasons to use a BI tool (like airfocus, of course) rather than the old-school combination of PowerPoint, Excel, and PDFs.

Manual composition and integration. Human error is normal but gets amplified in this kind of cross-platform, manual approach.

No real-time updates. Do you want to see the latest figures across the business? Schedule a few hours (at least) to stitch that report together.

Limited collaboration. Without real-time editing for multiple teams, keeping your documentation up to date will be an unnecessarily slow process.

Depending on how and where you store your documents, there may be security risks that more securely hosted tools mitigate.

That doesn’t sound super practical, right? Using a dedicated BI tool (like airfocus ) has several advantages worth considering.

Easy to use drag and drop interfaces that make adding data simple and quick

Customizable views for your roadmap. Do different teams need to focus on different data and see specific outcomes? This is a great way to maximize the value of your data across the business and is really easy to do with a BI tool.

Remote, real-time collaboration. A BI strategy and reports cover the entire business, so it’s pragmatic to ensure everyone can contribute to the documents. 

Integrate with linked projects. Your BI project will not exist in isolation, and BI tools will enable you to create custom levels and link project hierarchies. This will keep multiple teams aligned on related projects.

So… you’re probably left with a question at this point. How do you actually build a Business Intelligence roadmap so that you can see these deeper insights?

There are a few ways to do it, of course, but we’re proud to say that airfocus is one of the best (if we do say so ourselves). 

Our easy-to-use roadmap builder makes creating BI roadmaps simple with an intuitive drag-and-drop interface . 

View as a table , chart , board , or timeline — and set your own prioritization criteria to focus on what matters, next.

Share and export your BI roadmap with secured URLs or by exporting your roadmap and priorities to PDF .

What’s more, many of our roadmap templates are designed with the outcomes-based approach in mind, so you can hit the ground running when building your new Business Intelligence roadmap. 

Give it a try for yourself today — and don’t forget to watch out for our latest roadmapping guide, coming to an inbox near you very soon indeed.

airfocus modular platform

Build great roadmaps

Book a demo

Instant tour

airfocus modular platform

business intelligence career roadmap

Announcing Microsoft Copilot, your everyday AI companion

Sep 21, 2023 | Yusuf Mehdi - Corporate Vice President & Consumer Chief Marketing Officer

  • Share on Facebook (opens new window)
  • Share on Twitter (opens new window)
  • Share on LinkedIn (opens new window)

Copilot logo

We are entering a new era of AI, one that is fundamentally changing how we relate to and benefit from technology. With the convergence of chat interfaces and large language models you can now ask for what you want in natural language and the technology is smart enough to answer, create it or take action. At Microsoft, we think about this as having a copilot to help navigate any task. We have been building AI-powered copilots into our most used and loved products – making coding more efficient with GitHub, transforming productivity at work with Microsoft 365, redefining search with Bing and Edge and delivering contextual value that works across your apps and PC with Windows.

Today we take the next step to unify these capabilities into a single experience we call Microsoft Copilot, your everyday AI companion. Copilot will uniquely incorporate the context and intelligence of the web, your work data and what you are doing in the moment on your PC to provide better assistance – with your privacy and security at the forefront. It will be a simple and seamless experience, available in Windows 11, Microsoft 365, and in our web browser with Edge and Bing. It will work as an app or reveal itself when you need it with a right click. We will continue to add capabilities and connections to Copilot across to our most-used applications over time in service of our vision to have one experience that works across your whole life.

Copilot will begin to roll out in its early form as part of our free update to Windows 11, starting Sept. 26 — and across Bing, Edge, and Microsoft 365 Copilot this fall. We’re also announcing some exciting new experiences and devices to help you be more productive, spark your creativity, and to meet the everyday needs of people and businesses.

  • With over 150 new features, the next Windows 11 update is one of our most ambitious yet, bringing the power of Copilot and new AI powered experiences to apps like Paint, Photos, Clipchamp and more right to your Windows PC.
  • Bing will add support for the latest DALL.E 3 model from OpenAI and deliver more personalized answers based on your search history, a new AI-powered shopping experience, and updates to Bing Chat Enterprise, making it more mobile and visual.
  • Microsoft 365 Copilot will be generally available for enterprise customers on Nov. 1, 2023, along with Microsoft 365 Chat, a new AI assistant that will completely transform the way you work.
  • Additionally, we introduced powerful new Surface devices that bring all these AI experiences to life for you, and they are available for pre-order beginning today.

New Windows 11 Update delivers over 150 new features, including bringing the power of Copilot to the PC

Today, we’re thrilled to share our next step toward making Windows the destination for the best AI experiences – with a new update that delivers our most personal experience yet coming on Sept. 26.

Here’s a look at some of what’s new in the latest update for Windows 11:

YouTube Video

  • Copilot in Windows (in preview) empowers you to create faster, complete tasks with ease and lessens your cognitive load – making once complicated tasks, simple. We’ve made accessing the power of Copilot seamless as it’s always right there for you on the taskbar or with the Win+C keyboard shortcut providing assistance alongside all your apps, on all screen sizes at work, school or at home.
  • Paint has been enhanced with AI for drawing and digital creation with the addition of background removal and layers as well as a preview of Cocreator that brings the power of generative AI to the Paint app.
  • Photos has also been enhanced with AI including new features to make editing your photos a breeze. With Background Blur you can make the subject of your photo stand out quickly and easily. The Photos app automatically finds the background in the photo, and with a single click, instantly highlights your subject and blurs out the background. We’ve improved search, with photos stored in OneDrive (home or personal) accounts, you can now quickly find the photo you’re looking for based on the content of the photo. You can also now find photos based on the location where they were taken.
  • Snipping Tool now offers more ways to capture content on your screen – with this update you can now extract specific text content from an image to paste in another application or, you can easily protect your sensitive information with text redaction by using text actions on the post capture screen. And, with the addition of sound capturing using audio and mic support, it’s easier to create compelling videos and content from your screen.
  • Clipchamp , now with auto compose, helps you with scenes suggestions, edits and narratives based on your images and footage automatically so you can create and edit videos to share with family, friends, and social media like a pro.
  • Notepad will start automatically saving your session state allowing you to close Notepad without any interrupting dialogs and then pick up where you left off when you return. Notepad will automatically restore previously open tabs as well as unsaved content and edits across those open tabs.
  • With the new Outlook for Windows , you can connect and coordinate your various accounts (including Gmail, Yahoo, iCloud, and more) in one app. Intelligent tools help you write clear, concise emails and seamlessly attach important documents and photos from OneDrive. To learn more, visit this link .
  • Modernized File Explorer, we are introducing a modernized File Explorer home, address bar and search box all designed to help you more easily access important and relevant content, stay up to date with file activity and collaborate without even opening a file. Also coming to File Explorer is a new Gallery feature designed to make it easy to access your photo collection.
  • New text authoring experiences to voice access and new natural voices in Narrator , continuing our ongoing commitment to making Windows 11 the most accessible version of Windows yet.
  • Windows Backup makes moving to a new Windows 11 PC easier than ever. With Windows Backup, transitioning most files, apps and settings from one PC to another, is seamless so everything is right where you left it, exactly how you like it.

These experiences, including Copilot in Windows and more will start to become available on Sept. 26 as part of our latest update to Windows 11, version 22H2.

Bing and Edge are redefining how we interact with the web

Today, we’re announcing new features in Bing and Edge to supercharge your day powered by the latest models delivering the most advanced capabilities for AI available. You can use Bing Chat today with Microsoft Edge or at bing.com/chat. Features will begin to roll out soon.

  • Personalized answers. Now, your chat history can inform your results. For example, if you’ve used Bing to track your favorite soccer team, next time you’re planning a trip it can proactively tell you if the team is playing in your destination city. If you prefer responses that don’t use your chat history, you can turn this feature off in Bing settings.
  • Copilot in Microsoft Shopping. From Bing or Edge, you can now more quickly find what you’re shopping for online. When you ask for information on an item, Bing will ask additional questions to learn more, then use that information to provide more tailored recommendations. And you can trust you’re getting the best price – in fact, in the last 12 months, shoppers have been offered more than $4 billion in savings on Microsoft Edge. Soon, you’ll also be able to use a photo or saved image as the starting point for shopping.

Colorful AI created image of astronaut.

  • DALL.E 3 model from OpenAI in Bing Image Creator . DALL.E 3 delivers a huge leap forward with more beautiful creations and better renderings for details like fingers and eyes. It also has a better understanding of what you’re asking for, which results in delivering more accurate images. We’re also integrating Microsoft Designer directly into Bing to make editing your creations even easier.
  • Content Credentials . As we continue to take a responsible approach to generative AI, we’re adding new Content Credentials which uses cryptographic methods to add an invisible digital watermark to all AI-generated images in Bing – including time and date it was originally created. We will also bring support for Content Credentials to Paint and Microsoft Designer.
  • Bing Chat Enterprise Updates . Since its introduction just two months ago, more than 160 million Microsoft 365 users now have access to Bing Chat Enterprise at no additional cost and the response has been incredible. Today we’re announcing that Bing Chat Enterprise is now available in the Microsoft Edge mobile app. We’re also bringing support for multimodal visual search and Image Creator to Bing Chat Enterprise. Boost your creativity at work with the ability to find information using images and creating them.

Transforming work with Microsoft 365 Copilot, Bing Chat Enterprise and Windows

In March, we showed you what Microsoft 365 Copilot can do in the apps millions of people use every day across work and life – Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook and Teams – using just your own words. After months of learning alongside customers like Visa, General Motors, KPMG and Lumen Technologies, we’re excited to share that Microsoft 365 Copilot will be generally available for enterprise customers on Nov. 1.

Today, we’re also introducing a new, hero experience in Microsoft 365 Copilot: Microsoft 365 Chat. You saw a glimpse of Microsoft 365 Chat in March, then called Business Chat — but rapid advancements over the last few months have taken it to a whole new level. Microsoft 365 Chat combs across your entire universe of data at work, including emails, meetings, chats, documents and more, plus the web. Like an assistant, it has a deep understanding of you, your job, your priorities and your organization. It goes far beyond simple questions and answers to give you a head start on some of your most complex or tedious tasks — whether that’s writing a strategy document, booking a business trip, or catching up on emails.

Over the past few years, the pace and volume of work have only increased. On a given workday, our heaviest users search for what they need 18 times, receive over 250 Outlook emails and send or read nearly 150 Teams chats. [1] Teams users globally are in three times more meetings each week than they were in 2020. [2] And on Windows, some people use 11 apps in a single day to get work done. [3] Microsoft 365 Chat tames the complexity, eliminates the drudgery and helps you reclaim time at work. Preview customers can access it today on Microsoft365.com, Teams, or in Bing when signed in with their work account. In the future you’ll be able to access it wherever you see the Copilot icon when signed in with your work account.

To empower you at work, we’re also introducing new capabilities for Copilot in Outlook, Word, Excel, Loop, OneNote and OneDrive. Bing Chat Enterprise —the first entry point into generative AI for many companies — is getting a few upgrades. And as part of our big Windows 11 update, Windows 365 Switch and Windows 365 Boot will be generally available making it even easier to access your Windows Cloud PC. This will help employees achieve more, while making it easier for IT to deploy, manage and secure. Check out the Microsoft 365 blog to learn more about how Microsoft 365, Bing Chat Enterprise and Windows are transforming the way we work.

Unleashing personal productivity and creativity with Designer and Copilot in Microsoft 365

Designer , the newest addition to our family of Microsoft 365 consumer apps, helps you quickly create stunning visuals, social media posts, invitations, and more using cutting-edge AI. Today, we’re showing some powerful new features, many of which will be powered by OpenAI’s Dall.E 3. Generative expand uses AI to extend your image beyond its borders, generative fill adds a new object or background, and generative erase can remove unwanted objects. [4] Dall.E 3 will also soon power the image generation experience in Designer, making it easy to add original, higher quality images to your design in seconds.

We’re also integrating Designer into Microsoft 365 Copilot for consumers — starting with Word. Designer uses the context of your document to propose visuals to choose from; you can make it more personal by uploading your own photos too. And within moments, you can transform a text-heavy document with custom graphics. We’re starting to test Microsoft 365 Copilot with a small group of Microsoft 365 consumer subscribers and look forward to expanding the preview to more people over time. Seventy percent of creators tell us one of the most difficult parts of the creation process is just getting started. [5] With creative tools like Designer, plus Bing Image Creator, Clipchamp and Paint, you can now have an immediate visual draft of almost anything — with a few simple prompts.

Introducing new Surface devices available for pre-order beginning today for people and businesses

There is no better stage to bring to life all of the incredible AI experiences from across Microsoft than our new Surface devices. Surface is at the forefront of device performance and processor technology. We have been investing in silicon advancements to augment this next wave of AI innovation, unlocking experiences like Windows Studio Effects in Surface Pro 9 with 5G and continuing to increase performance to run the latest AI models with powerful devices like the new Surface Laptop Studio 2.

  • The new Surface Laptop Studio 2 is the most powerful Surface we’ve ever built. Turbocharged with the latest Intel® Core processors and cutting-edge NVIDIA® Studio tools for creators-with up to 2x more graphics performance than MacBook Pro M2 Max, [6] Surface Laptop Studio brings together the versatility to create and the power to perform — a stunning 14.4″ PixelSense Flow touchscreen display and flexible design with three unique postures. And with new customizations brought to the haptic touchpad to improve accessibility – we’re proud to call it the most inclusive touchpad on any laptop today.
  • The new Surface Laptop Go 3 will turn heads with its balance of style and performance. It’s our lightest and most portable Surface Laptop, with a touchscreen display, and packed with premium features like an incredible typing experience and a Fingerprint Power Button, and it comes in four stylish colors. With Intel ® Core i5 performance, all-day battery life, and robust RAM and storage options, it’s the perfect everyday laptop and stage for the latest AI tools from Microsoft.

Surface Go device with detachable keyboard, mouse and pen

  • Surface Go 4 for Business is our most portable Surface 2-in-1. This fall, the new Surface Go will be available exclusively for organizations to meet the growing needs of frontline workers and educators. We can’t wait to see how it will help businesses modernize and make their users more productive.
  • S urface Hub 3 is the premier collaboration device built for hybrid work, designed end-to-end by Microsoft. The Microsoft Teams Rooms on Windows experience is familiar and intuitive on a brilliant 50” or 85” screen. The 50” Surface Hub 3 brings entirely new ways to co-create with Portrait, Smart Rotation and Smart AV. AI-enhanced collaboration tools – like Cloud IntelliFrame and Copilot in Whiteboard – shine on Surface Hub 3.

Surface on large docking station

  • 3D printable Adaptive Pen Grips for Surface Pen have been added to our lineup of adaptive accessories enabling more people to engage in digital inking and creation than before. They are available for purchase through Shapeways or as downloadable plans for 3D printing. To hear more about how we’re taking steps to close the disability divide, check out our video .

To pre-order one of our incredible new Surface devices , visit Microsoft.com, Bestbuy.com, and our Surface for Business page and blog to learn more about all of today’s new products.

The new era of AI with Copilot from Microsoft is here – and it’s ready for you

We believe that Microsoft is the place where powerful, useful AI experiences come together – simply, securely and responsibly – into the products you use most. Today, we showed you how we are not only increasing the usefulness of these experiences, but we are expanding them​. From Windows 11 as the destination for the best AI experiences to empower people using it at work, school and home​. To Microsoft 365, the most trusted productivity suite on the planet​. To Bing and Edge, the most innovative search engine and browser available​. All of it coming together on Windows 11 PCs like Surface​. And with Copilot helping you get things done, helping you create and connect to people you care about or the world around you​. We can’t wait to see what you can do with these experiences.

Learn more on the  Microsoft 365 blog  and the Security blog . And for all the blogs, videos and assets related to today’s announcements, please visit our  microsite .

[1] Data represents top 20% of users by volume of searches across M365 services, emails received, and sent and read chats in Teams, respectively.

[2] Microsoft annual Work Trend Index 2023- Work Trend Index | Will AI Fix Work? (microsoft.com)

[3] Data reflects the top 20% Windows devices by app volume per day.

[4] Generative erase in Microsoft Designer is generally available to try today, with generative expand and fill coming soon.

[5] Survey of 941 creators commissioned by Microsoft in June 2022.

[6] Tested by Microsoft in September 2023 using CineBench 2024 GPU benchmark comparing Surface Laptop Studio 2 with RTX 2000 Ada Generation to MacBook Pro14” with M2 Max 19 12 core / 30 core configuration.

Tags: AI , Bing , Designer , Microsoft 365 , Microsoft Copilot , Microsoft Edge , Surface , Windows 11

  • Check us out on RSS

business intelligence career roadmap

IMAGES

  1. Five Years Business Intelligence Analyst Career Roadmap With Salary

    business intelligence career roadmap

  2. Six Months Business Intelligence Employee Career Roadmap With Salary

    business intelligence career roadmap

  3. Business Intelligence Career Roadmap Template

    business intelligence career roadmap

  4. Three Months Business Intelligence Analyst Career Roadmap

    business intelligence career roadmap

  5. Six Months Business Intelligence Employee Career Roadmap

    business intelligence career roadmap

  6. Three Months Business Intelligence Employee Career Roadmap

    business intelligence career roadmap

VIDEO

  1. #1 Certificate To Be a Data Analyst or Data Scientist

  2. Career Roadmap

  3. Business Intelligence and Analytics: Student Life

  4. Business Analytics Career Roadmap ✅💯 #businessanalytics #dataanalytics #powerbi #statistics

  5. Careers in Business Intelligence 💼 #shorts

  6. Azure Data Engineering Roadmap 🔥💯 #azure

COMMENTS

  1. Business Analyst Career Road Map

    The Career Road Map is designed to identify the many roles within business analysis, and show your options based on your experience today. It includes the emerging roles in business architecture and business intelligence which are in high demand. Learn More About Business Analysis Certification Continuing Evolution of Business Analysis

  2. Career roadmap: Business intelligence analyst

    Career roadmap: Business intelligence analyst. Data is often described as the 'new oil'. But while most understand the importance of data, it is the business intelligence analysts who are able to ...

  3. Business Intelligence (BI) Careers

    Potential careers for a business intelligence major include analyst, specialist, consultant, and project manager. Professionals in this field can work in the private or public sectors. Our guide outlines more information about careers in business intelligence, including job projections and career advancement opportunities.

  4. Business Intelligence Career Path: How to Land a BI Job in 2022

    Business intelligence careers generally have three tracks: Analytics, Engineer, or Architecture. Business intelligence analysts evaluate business data and generate insights to help businesses reduce costs, maximize profits or gain a competitive edge.

  5. What Is a Business Intelligence Analyst? Making Data-Driven Business

    Written by Coursera • Updated on Jun 15, 2023 Business intelligence analysts use data to help businesses navigate decisions. Once you have the necessary skills, there are several paths you can take to become one. What does a business intelligence analyst do?

  6. What Is a Business Analyst? 2023 Career Guide

    Business analysts use data to form business insights and recommend changes in businesses and other organizations. Business analysts can identify issues in virtually any part of an organization, including IT processes, organizational structures, or staff development. As businesses seek to increase efficiency and reduce costs, business analytics ...

  7. Business Intelligence Career Guide

    The Business Intelligence Roadmap Career Guide is your complete guide to the skills required, career opportunities available and the ideal BI roadmap learning path needed to propel a career in the thriving and lucrative field.

  8. How to Become a Business Intelligence Analyst

    Step 1: Earn a Degree. The first step to start a career as a business intelligence analyst is to earn a degree. You can pursue a bachelor's degree in any of the relevant fields for business intelligence analysts. These include computer science, data science, business, and finance.

  9. Become a Business Intelligence Analyst

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) categorizes business intelligence analysts as operations research analysts. As of May 2021, the BLS reports that the median annual salary for business intelligence analysts under this general classification is $82,360. This can vary based on location.

  10. Business intelligence career paths

    BI developer You can think of business intelligence developers as situated somewhere between analysis-heavy roles like data scientists and analysts and engineering roles like an analytics engineer or data engineer.

  11. Business Intelligence Analyst Job Profile

    Blog Your Next Move: Business Intelligence Analyst Friday, November 12, 2021 | By Emily Matzelle This article is part of an IT Career News series called Your Next Move. These articles take an inside look at the roles related to CompTIA certifications.

  12. Business Intelligence (BI) Analyst Career Path

    Mar 29, 2022 Who is a BI Analyst? Business intelligence (BI) analysts transform data into insights that drive business value.

  13. Become a Business Intelligence Analyst

    This Business Intelligence Analyst Career Path is your step-by-step roadmap to go from beginner (at any age!) to getting hired. You'll be guided through our curated curriculum of courses, workshops, challenges, and action items to build your skills, portfolio and experience to become a Business Intelligence Analyst.

  14. Business Intelligence (BI) Career Paths

    Business Intelligence Career Path: Back-End Development. For back-end BI development, the foundational skills revolve around 3 primary capabilities. The ability to source data: This involves being able to collect data in whatever system, stream, location, and format it exists. The ability to manipulate data: The raw data you're working with ...

  15. BI Analyst Career Path / Roadmap

    The following represents the career path or career roadmap of a BI analyst: BI Analyst: The journey begins as a BI Analyst, where professionals with 2 to 4 years of experience enter the field. In this role, they develop foundational data analysis and reporting skills using tools like SQL, Excel, and data visualization software.

  16. BI roadmap

    BI roadmap. During a BI project, you will find a list of activities ordered almost in a sequential way, representing the flow of data throughout a pipeline. At the same time, these activities may belong to specific roles of their own; they are highly technical, and the use of modern tools is almost mandatory. Use this section of the book as a ...

  17. How to Become a BI Developer in 2023: Tips & Advice

    BI Developer Job Description BI development is a technical role that requires both knowledge of database and software development as well as business processes and requirements. Based on common BI developer job descriptions, candidates can expect to: Develop, maintain and support ETL processes using tools such as Microsoft SSIS

  18. Business Intelligence roadmap

    Making a Business Intelligence roadmap is a matter of consistently following four steps: Take stock of your current situation. Based on interviews, automated surveys, and analysis of your documentation and systems, map your current situation. Our BI consultants will help you create and test a vision for Business Analytics.

  19. Top Business Intelligence Careers To Know

    Business Intelligence (BI) comprises a career field that supports organizations to make driven decisions by offering valuable insights. Business Intelligence is closely knitted to the field of data science since it leverages information acquired through large data sets to deliver insightful reports.

  20. BI Roadmap For A Thriving Business Intelligence Strategy

    Investing in BI shouldn't be taken lately. Whether you are starting from scratch, moving past spreadsheets, or looking to migrate to a new platform: you need a business intelligence strategy and roadmap in place. We previously discussed business intelligence for small businesses.

  21. Business Intelligence Roadmap for a successful BI Strategy

    Business intelligence roadmap refers to all the steps you undertake in order to implement business intelligence in your company. It goes all the way to diving in the BI process, defining the stakeholders and main actors, to assessing the situation, defining the goals and finding the performance indicators that will help you measure your efforts to achieve these goals.

  22. Business Intelligence Roadmaps: How To Plan For BI Outcomes

    Introducing: The Business Intelligence roadmap. Wrangling all of your BI insights — without giving yourself a migraine — might sound like a tall order, but it's much easier with a Business Intelligence roadmap.. A Business Intelligence roadmap helps key stakeholders to track and visualize all of your BI data across organizational silos, over time.A roadmap like this will allow at-a ...

  23. Announcing Microsoft Copilot, your everyday AI companion

    With over 150 new features, the next Windows 11 update is one of our most ambitious yet, bringing the power of Copilot and new AI powered experiences to apps like Paint, Photos, Clipchamp and more right to your Windows PC. Bing will add support for the latest DALL.E 3 model from OpenAI and deliver more personalized answers based on your search ...