Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations

Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations

Creating a solid business plan is the backbone of any successful nonprofit organization. It's the roadmap that guides your mission, helps you secure funding, and attracts the right partners to amplify your impact. ClickUp's Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations is designed to streamline this process and empower you to achieve your goals.

With this template, you can:

  • Clearly define your organization's mission, vision, and values
  • Set measurable goals and outline strategies to achieve them
  • Identify and engage key stakeholders and donors
  • Track and manage your budget and resources effectively

Don't let the complexity of business planning hold you back. Use ClickUp's Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations to create a compelling roadmap for success, and make a lasting difference in the world.

Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations Benefits

A business plan template for nonprofit organizations offers a range of benefits that help these organizations achieve their mission and make a positive impact:

  • Clearly define and articulate the organization's mission, vision, and values
  • Develop a comprehensive strategy to achieve organizational goals and objectives
  • Create a roadmap for sustainable growth and long-term success
  • Attract potential donors, investors, and strategic partners by showcasing the organization's impact and value
  • Secure funding and resources by demonstrating financial stability and accountability
  • Effectively communicate the organization's purpose and impact to stakeholders and the community
  • Foster collaboration and alignment among board members, staff, and volunteers
  • Ensure transparency and accountability in organizational operations and decision-making processes.

Main Elements of Nonprofit Organizations Business Plan Template

Nonprofit organizations can effectively plan and manage their operations with ClickUp’s Business Plan Template. Here are the key elements included in this List template:

  • Custom Statuses: Track the progress of each section of your business plan with statuses like Complete, In Progress, Needs Revision, and To Do.
  • Custom Fields: Add important details to your business plan using custom fields such as Reference, Approved, and Section, allowing you to organize and categorize information.
  • Custom Views: Access different views to analyze your business plan from various angles. Explore the Topics view to focus on specific sections, the Status view to track progress, the Timeline view to visualize deadlines, the Business Plan view to get an overview, and the Getting Started Guide view to assist you in using the template effectively.

With ClickUp's Business Plan Template, nonprofit organizations can confidently plan, strategize, and communicate their mission and goals to stakeholders and donors.

How To Use Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations

Creating a business plan for a nonprofit organization can be a daunting task, but with the help of ClickUp's Business Plan Template, you can break it down into manageable steps. Here are four steps to guide you through the process:

1. Define your mission and vision

Start by clearly defining the mission and vision of your nonprofit organization. What is the purpose of your organization? What impact do you want to make in the community? Having a clear mission and vision will guide your decision-making and help you stay focused on your goals.

Use the Docs feature in ClickUp to create a document where you can articulate your mission and vision statements.

2. Identify your target audience and stakeholders

Identify the specific audience or community that your nonprofit organization aims to serve. Who are the people or groups that will benefit from your programs or services? Additionally, identify the key stakeholders who have an interest in your organization, such as donors, volunteers, and community partners.

Use the Custom Fields feature in ClickUp to create fields for tracking your target audience and stakeholders.

3. Develop your programs and services

Outline the programs and services that your nonprofit organization will offer to fulfill its mission. What specific activities or initiatives will you undertake to achieve your goals? Consider the resources, staff, and partnerships that will be needed to implement these programs effectively.

Use the Tasks feature in ClickUp to create tasks for each program or service, assign responsibilities, and set deadlines.

4. Create a financial plan

Develop a comprehensive financial plan for your nonprofit organization. This includes identifying potential sources of funding, such as grants, donations, or fundraising events. Estimate your projected income and expenses, and create a budget that aligns with your programs and services.

Use the Dashboards feature in ClickUp to track your financial plan, monitor income and expenses, and visualize your budget.

By following these four steps and utilizing ClickUp's Business Plan Template, you can create a well-structured and impactful business plan for your nonprofit organization. Good luck!

Get Started with ClickUp’s Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations

Nonprofit organizations can use this Business Plan Template to create a comprehensive and strategic plan to achieve their mission and goals.

First, hit “Add Template” to sign up for ClickUp and add the template to your Workspace. Make sure you designate which Space or location in your Workspace you’d like this template applied.

Next, invite relevant members or guests to your Workspace to start collaborating.

Now you can take advantage of the full potential of this template to create a powerful business plan:

  • Use the Topics View to organize your plan into different sections such as Mission, Goals, Strategies, and Financials
  • The Status View will help you track the progress of each section, whether it's Complete, In Progress, Needs Revision, or To Do
  • The Timeline View will give you a visual representation of your plan's milestones and deadlines
  • The Business Plan View will provide a comprehensive overview of your entire plan, including all sections and details
  • Use the Getting Started Guide View to provide step-by-step instructions and guidance for team members who are new to the plan
  • Customize the Reference, Approved, and Section custom fields to add additional details and categorize your plan
  • Update statuses and custom fields as you make progress and receive approvals
  • Monitor and analyze your plan to ensure it aligns with your organization's goals and objectives.
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How to Write a Nonprofit Business Plan + Full Example

how to write a nonprofit business plan

A nonprofit business plan is an essential tool for any organization looking to grow and achieve its goals. By taking the time to develop a comprehensive plan, your nonprofit can ensure that it is on the right track for success.

What is a Nonprofit Business Plan?

A non-profit business plan is a document that outlines the goals, strategies, and financial projections of a nonprofit organization. It can be used to attract funding from donors or investors and to track the progress of the nonprofit over time.

Download our Ultimate Nonprofit Business Plan Template here

Why Do You Need a Business Plan For Your Nonprofit?

A nonprofit business plan is important for several reasons.

  • It can help you clarify your organization’s goals and strategies.
  • It can help you assess the feasibility of your proposed projects and programs.
  • It can be used to attract funding from donors or investors.
  • It can help you track the progress of your nonprofit over time.

Preparing To Write Your Nonprofit Business Plan

Every nonprofit group needs to have a business plan in place before its existence. The purpose of the business plan is to provide direction and ensure that the nonprofit’s resources are used in an effective manner.

The first step in writing a nonprofit business plan is to conduct a feasibility study. This study will help to determine whether or not the nonprofit is viable and whether or not it has the potential to be successful. The feasibility study should include an assessment of the current market, an examination of the competition, and a review of the financial resources that are available to the nonprofit.

The nonprofit must be able to answer the following four questions:

  • What will you do?
  • How will you do it?
  • Who will be responsible for carrying out your activities?
  • What resources (money, people, equipment) do you need in order to carry out your plans?

Once the feasibility study has been conducted, the next step is to develop a mission statement for the nonprofit. This statement should explain what the nonprofit is trying to achieve and why it exists. The mission statement should be clear and concise, and it should be easy for nonprofit staff, board members, and donors to understand.

The nonprofit’s mission statement should be clear and concise. It should answer the following questions:

  • What is your nonprofit organization’s purpose?
  • What are your goals?
  • Who do you serve?
  • What makes you unique?

Next, determine your target audience. Who do you plan to serve with your nonprofit services? You need to know their characteristics (location, age range, gender, income level, etc.). This information will help you determine how best to reach them and what services to offer.

Once you know your target audience it is important to determine what services you will offer them. List each service in detail including what it is, how it will benefit your target audience, and what resources are needed to provide it.

Now that you know these key pieces of information, it’s time to develop a nonprofit business plan that will help the nonprofit grow over time. The business plan should include information on the nonprofit’s products, services, target audience, nonprofit marketing strategies, nonprofit operations plans utilizing its human resources and financial resources.

In addition to the four questions listed above, your nonprofit’s business plan should also answer the following:

  • What is your nonprofit’s organizational structure?
  • How will you raise money?
  • What are your marketing plans?
  • What are your policies and procedures?

Your nonprofit’s business plan is a living document that should be updated regularly as your organization grows and changes. It is important to revisit it often and make sure that all of your plans and activities remain in line with your mission statement.

How to Write Your Nonprofit Business Plan

There is no one formula for writing a nonprofit business plan. However, there are a few key elements that every business plan should include. Here are the essential components:

  • Executive Summary – This is a summary of your entire business plan, and should include a brief description of your nonprofit organization, its mission and goals, the problem you are trying to solve, your proposed solutions, and an overview of your financial projections.
  • Organization Overview – This section should include a description of your nonprofit organization, its history, governing structure, and key programs and services.
  • Products, Programs, and Services – This section should describe the products, programs, and services your nonprofit offers in detail.
  • Market Analysis – This section should include an analysis of the nonprofit market, including information on the size of the market, the competition, and the needs and wants of your target audience.
  • Customer Analysis – This section should include an analysis of your nonprofit’s target audience, including information on their demographics, needs, and wants.
  • Marketing Strategy – This section should include a detailed marketing plan, including information on how you will reach your target audience and what methods you will use to promote your products, programs, and services.
  • Operations Plan – This section should include a detailed description of your organization’s day-to-day operations, including information on staffing, facilities, equipment, and supplies.
  • Management Team – This section should include the biographies of your nonprofit’s governing board members, executive director, and any other key staff.
  • Financial Plan – This section should include a detailed financial forecast, including information on your nonprofit’s income and expenses, as well as projections for the next three to five years.
  • Appendix – This section can include additional information such as copies of your nonprofit’s bylaws or articles of incorporation, letters of support from key stakeholders, or market research surveys.

Learn more about each of these essential components using our non-profit business plan template.

Sample Nonprofit Business Plan

Nonprofit business plan example – let children prosper, executive summary.

Let Children Prosper is a nonprofit organization that provides educational resources to low-income families in the New Orleans, LA community. The organization was founded in response to the high school dropout rate in the city, which is disproportionately high among low-income students. Let Children Prosper’s goal is to help these students stay in school and graduate with the skills they need to succeed in life.

Organization Overview

Let Children Prosper was founded in 2014 by Jamal Brown and Latonya Williams. The organization is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and operates out of New Orleans, LA. Let Children Prosper’s mission is to provide educational resources to low-income families in order to help their children succeed in school and beyond.

Nonprofit Mission Statement

Our nonprofit’s mission is to provide educational resources to low-income families so their children can stay in school and graduate with the skills they need to succeed. Let Children Prosper believes that education is the key to breaking the cycle of poverty and helping low-income individuals and their families achieve economic security.

Vision Statement

Our nonprofit aims to expand our presence throughout New Orleans, LA by securing nonprofit funding from both public and private sources. We also hope to reach schools throughout Louisiana and other states.

Products, Programs, and Services

Our nonprofit’s vision is to provide educational resources to low-income families with children who are at risk of dropping out of school due to a lack of resources.

Our nonprofit works to equip these students with the skills necessary for achieving economic security, which makes them more likely to graduate high school and attend college or vocational school.

We aim for our nonprofit’s services to be accessible throughout New Orleans, LA as well as schools across Louisiana and other states so that we can reach as many families in need as possible.

We hope that by offering free programs such as financial literacy classes and workforce development services, Let Children Prosper will help break the cycle of poverty by equipping low-income individuals with the skills needed for achieving economic stability. Listed below are some of our nonprofit’s core programs.

  • Financial Literacy Classes: These classes provide essential information about financial planning and budgeting so that families can make sound financial decisions for their children’s education and future.
  • Workforce Development Services: These services help prepare individuals for careers by teaching them essential skills such as resume writing, interviewing techniques, and job search strategies.

Market Analysis

Our nonprofit’s target audience is low-income families with children who are at risk of failing school due to a lack of educational resources.

According to the National Center for Children in Poverty, “Although poverty rates declined during the 1990s, they remain high; 21 percent of American children under age 18 (16 million) were poor in 2010, compared to 18 percent (15 million) before the recession” (NCCP).

Let Children Prosper offers several core programs that provide resources such as financial literacy classes and workforce development services which our target audience needs to help them through difficult times and equip them with skills necessary for achieving economic security.

A study conducted by Tulane University reports that students living in New Orleans, LA are three times more likely to drop out of school than other students in Louisiana and the rates of high school dropouts among students living in poverty are approximately seven times as high as those living above poverty (Tulane University).

Given these alarming statistics, it is evident that our nonprofit is much needed in the area.

Customer Analysis

Our nonprofit’s customers are low-income families who have children who are at risk of dropping out of school.

These families may not have access to essential resources that their children need in order to stay in school and graduate.

Let Children Prosper offers financial literacy classes and workforce development services that can help these students achieve economic security and break the cycle of poverty.

The table below shows data from a study conducted by Tulane University which illustrates that there is a significant need for our nonprofit’s services.

Source: Tulane University

The table above shows that there is a significant need for our nonprofit’s services among low-income families who are of different races and ethnicities.

For example, the percentage of African American children living in poverty is 71%, which is significantly higher than the percentage of Caucasian children living in poverty (10%).

This data illustrates that our nonprofit reaches a wide variety of people who are in need and provides them with essential resources that they may not have access to otherwise.  

Marketing Strategy

Our nonprofit marketing strategy will include the use of print, radio, and television advertisements as well as social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter.

We will also distribute flyers and brochures in local schools, community centers, and churches.

Lastly, we will host information sessions and workshops to provide more detail about our nonprofit’s programs.

The table below shows data from a study conducted by Nielsen which illustrates that African American families are more likely to watch television than Hispanic and Caucasian families.

nielsen ethnicity tv habits

Source: Nielsen

This data indicates that Let Children Prosper should focus on running television advertisements since this is the most effective way to reach our target audience.

We should also consider running radio advertisements, as African American and Hispanic families are more likely to listen to the radio than Caucasian families.

Lastly, we should focus on using social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to reach our target audience.  

Operations Plan

Let Children Prosper is a nonprofit organization that offers workforce development services and financial literacy classes to low-income families who have children at risk of dropping out of school.

The organization’s day-to-day operations will include providing these services to the target audience.

Let Children Prosper will be staffed by a team of experienced professionals who are passionate about helping low-income families break the cycle of poverty.

Let Children Prosper will operate out of a facility that is located in a low-income area. This facility will be equipped with the necessary resources to provide our services.

Let Children Prosper will need to purchase supplies in order to provide workforce development services and financial literacy classes.

Goals & Initiatives

Our nonprofit has three primary goals which we will focus our efforts on achieving in the 20XX fiscal year:

  • Goal 1: To provide quality educational programming and services to students in need.
  • Goal 2: To increase the academic success of students in our programs.
  • Goal 3: To secure funding to support our programs and services.

To achieve our goals, we will undertake the following initiatives:

  • Initiative 1: Expand our tutoring and case management programs to serve more students.
  • Initiative 2: Conduct research on best practices in nonprofit education and implement these practices in our programming.
  • Initiative 3: Hold fundraising events and seek corporate sponsorships to generate revenue for our nonprofit.
  • Initiative 4: Increase the visibility of our nonprofit through marketing and communications efforts.

Management Team

Let Children Prosper will be operated by a staff of five people who will be responsible for managing the nonprofit’s programs and services.

Let Children Prosper’s organizational structure can be seen below:

example nonprofit organization chart

The nonprofit’s Director and Program Manager will work closely with the nonprofit’s Board of Directors to monitor our nonprofit’s progress and evaluate the effectiveness of our programs.

Our nonprofit will also hire tutors and case managers who will provide individualized attention to students in need which are vital for their academic success.

Sue Smith is the nonprofit’s Director and Program Manager. She has over 10 years of experience working with nonprofit organizations, and she has a degree in Sociology from Tulane University.

George Brown is the nonprofit’s Program Manager. He has over 5 years of experience working with nonprofit organizations, and he has a degree in Business Administration from Southern Methodist University.

Caitlin Moore is the nonprofit’s Development Director. She has over 7 years of experience working in nonprofit development, and she has a degree in Psychology from Tulane University.

Jessica Doe is the nonprofit’s Fundraising Coordinator. She has over 5 years of experience working in nonprofit fundraising, and she has a degree in Communication Studies from the University of Texas at Austin.

Lisa Davis is the nonprofit’s Marketing & Communications Specialist. She has over 10 years of experience working in nonprofit marketing and communications, and she has a degree in Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin.

Board of Directors:

Kelly Johnson is the nonprofit’s Board Chairperson. She is a community leader and business owner who has over 20 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector.

John Doe is the nonprofit’s Board Vice-Chairperson. He is a community leader and business owner who has over 20 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector.

Mary Smith is the nonprofit’s Board Treasurer. She is a community volunteer who has over 10 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector.

Sam Smith is the nonprofit’s Board Secretary. He is a community volunteer who has over 10 years of experience working in the nonprofit sector.

Let Children Prosper’s nonprofit board of directors has a combined 20 years of experience working in nonprofit leadership and management.

Over the course of Let Children Prosper’s first year of operations, we expect that the nonprofit will need to hire tutors and case managers as well as new volunteers to help with fundraising efforts; however, these positions will not be included in our nonprofit’s budget for 20XX.

Financial Plan

Our nonprofit is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization and relies on donations from individuals, businesses, and other organizations to fund our programs and services.

In order to continue providing our essential programs and services, we need to secure funding from both public and private sources.

Some of the ways in which we hope to secure this funding include applying for grants, holding fundraising events, and seeking corporate sponsorships.

Income Statement

Our nonprofit’s income statement is shown below:

As a result of our net income of $83,568 in Year 2, we will be able to continue providing our essential programs and services to the community.  

Balance Sheet

Our nonprofit’s balance sheet is shown below:

The nonprofit’s net assets will increase by $35,000 as a result of our income statement.  

Cash Flow Statement

Our nonprofit’s cash flow statement is shown below:

The nonprofit’s expected cash balance of $90,188 will be used to continue providing our essential programs and services to the community.

For 20XX, we expect that most of our funds will come from private donations; however, we require some donations for our operating expenses. As a result, the nonprofit plans to apply for grants this year.

Additionally, the nonprofit is always looking for opportunities to expand its fundraising efforts with events or corporate sponsorships. The nonprofit has also begun looking into ways we can use social media to develop a stronger online presence and increase brand awareness.

Let Children Prosper is committed to transparency and accountability. We will be publishing our nonprofit’s annual report on our website which will include a financial overview as well as program and service highlights.

Fundraising Strategy

The nonprofit plans to seek out individual donors as well as larger contributions from businesses and other organizations.

Our nonprofit relies on donations from individuals, businesses, and other organizations.

In order to continue providing our essential programs and services, we need to secure funding from both public and private sources. Some of the ways in which we hope to secure this funding include applying for grants, holding fundraising events, and seeking corporate sponsorships.

In order to generate more donations, we will be undertaking the following fundraising initiatives:

  • Annual Appeal Letter: This letter will be sent to past donors in order to request contributions for our nonprofit’s education programs.
  • Social Media Campaign: We will create a social media campaign on various platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to promote our nonprofit’s work and request donations from the public.
  • Online Fundraising Page: We will create an online fundraising page where individuals can donate to our nonprofit.

As a nonprofit organization, we aim to engage in donor outreach and online fundraising through websites such as Facebook and PayPal. We also plan to create a nonprofit blog where individuals can stay informed about our mission and learn how they can become involved with Let Children Prosper.

We are also exploring the option of hosting an annual fundraiser that will feature live entertainment, food, drinks, and opportunities to interact with nonprofit representatives.

Our nonprofit’s Board Treasurer is also a member of the Grants Coordinating Committee for the nonprofit’s parent organization which has resources that may be useful in securing grant funds for Let Children Prosper. Additionally, the nonprofit will begin looking into using social media such as Facebook or Instagram to increase brand awareness and improve brand recognition among our target audience.

The nonprofit has also applied for membership in the National Association of Nonprofit Organizations & Executives which will provide access to additional resources and training related to nonprofit management and fundraising.

Nonprofit Business Plan Example PDF

Download our non-profit business plan pdf here. This is a free nonprofit business plan example to help you get started on your own nonprofit plan.  

Writing a Nonprofit Business Plan Conclusion

Developing this type of business plan can be challenging for many nonprofit groups because they may lack familiarity with basic business principles such as market research and financial projections. There are several steps that can be taken to make the process go more smoothly:

  • Get your team involved – A strong team effort will not only ensure that everyone has a voice when it comes to planning but also increase buy-in and motivation.
  • Utilize resources – There are many helpful resources available for nonprofit organizations, including books, online tutorials, and non-profit business plan template . Get our FREE nonprofit business plan pdf or nonprofit business plan Word .
  • Seek expert help – If you’re feeling overwhelmed or unsure where to start, it may be helpful to consult with an experienced business consultant or nonprofit organization.

How to Finish Your Nonprofit Business Plan in 1 Day!

Don’t you wish there was a faster, easier way to finish your business plan?

With Growthink’s Ultimate Nonprofit Business Plan Template you can finish your plan in just 8 hours or less!

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Nonprofit organizations have a unique set of needs and requirements. That’s why these sample business plans for nonprofit organizations and social enterprise businesses can help you get started on the right foot.

If you’re looking to develop a more modern business plan, we recommend you try LivePlan . It contains the same templates and information you see here, but with additional guidance to help you develop the perfect plan.

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Nonprofit Organization Business Plan Template

Nonprofit Organization Business Plan Template

Promote your non-profit organization today. create a non profit organization business plan template with venngage’s drag-and-drop editor..

  • Design Style : modern, fun
  • Colors : vibrant
  • Size : Letter
  • Plan : premium

Create and customize your non-profit business plan using Venngage’s non profit organization business plan template. Easily customize your non-profit’s business plan by modifying texts, fonts, photos, icons, and backgrounds with just a few clicks of your button. A non-profit organization needs a solid plan to succeed. To gain support for your organization, you must communicate your mission, vision, goals, and objectives to stakeholders. You must be able to relay your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to survival. You can accomplish all these things efficiently by creating a non profit organization business plan template. Non-profit organizations rely on the support of other people to thrive. By relaying information about your organization’s goals, plans, and objectives in a format that stakeholders can easily understand, you can attract more supporters for your cause. A big challenge among nonprofit organizations is creating a solid business plan. Not every organization has the experience and skills to craft a professional non-profit business plan from start to finish. But with this non profit organization business plan template, you’ll be able to prepare your strategic plan within minutes. This pre-made business plan

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Nonprofit startup resources

Find helpful resources for starting a nonprofit, such as checklists, nonprofit associations, legal support, and government agencies.

Nonprofit startup assessment

Assess your readiness to start a nonprofit, and access resources to build your skills and knowledge as a founder.

You should take this diagnostic if:

  • You are thinking about starting or have recently started a nonprofit
  • You have not previously navigated the processes of incorporation and applying for 501(c)(3) status
  • You are looking for funding to support a community project
  • You are hoping to gain employment by founding a nonprofit organization
  • You got your 501(c)(3) and need help to implement your program ideas and secure funding

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About this tool

This assessment is for people who are either considering or are already in the early stages of starting a nonprofit. Questions will assess background knowledge, capital, and work experience that are relevant to starting a nonprofit.

Once the assessment is complete, the results will provide customized resources to guide your team on identifying funding, navigating the legal process, developing a business plan, and launching programs.

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Free business plan template (with examples)

Alan Bradley

Sierra Campbell

Sierra Campbell

“Verified by an expert” means that this article has been thoroughly reviewed and evaluated for accuracy.

Updated 3:37 a.m. UTC Feb. 12, 2024

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Starting a business can be a daunting undertaking. As with so many large projects, one of the most difficult challenges is just getting started, and one of the best ways to start is by putting together a plan. A plan is also a powerful tool for communication and can serve as a cornerstone for onboarding new partners and employees or for demonstrating your philosophy and priorities to potential collaborators. 

A solid business plan will not only provide a framework for your business going forward but will also give you an early opportunity to organize and refine your thoughts and define your mission statement, providing a guidepost that can serve as a beacon for your business for years to come. We’ve provided a business plan template below to help guide you in the creation of your new enterprise.

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Business plan template

What should a business plan include?

Regardless of the type of business you own or the products and services you provide, every business plan should include some core elements:

  • Mission statement. The definition and executive summary of your business.
  • Market analysis. A breakdown of the market segment and customers you hope to reach, built through primary (gathered by you) and secondary (gathered from outside sources) research.
  • Organization and logistics. The nuts and bolts of how your business is operated
  • Products or services. What your company provides its customers.
  • Advertising and marketing. How you intend to get your products in front of your customers.
  • Forecasting. Revenue forecasting for partners or potential investors.

Why do you need a business plan?

A business plan is a framework for success. It provides a number of key benefits:

  • Structure. The outline around which to design your business.
  • Operational guidance. A signpost for how to run your business from day to day.
  • Expansion. A vision for the future growth of your enterprise.
  • Definition. A platform to consider every element of your business and how best to execute your plans for them.
  • Collaboration. A synopsis of what’s exceptional about your business and a way to attract funding, investment or partnerships.
  • Onboarding. An efficient summary of your business for new or potential employees.

Business plan examples

We’ve created two fictional companies to illustrate how a business might use a business plan to sketch out goals and opportunities as well as forecast revenue.

Bling, Incorporated

Our first hypothetical example is a jewelry and accessory creator called Bling, Incorporated. A hybrid business that manufactures its products for sale both online and through physical retail channels, Bling’s mission statement is focused on transforming simple, inexpensive ingredients into wearable statement pieces of art. 

Market analysis includes gathering data around sourcing sustainable, inexpensive components, aesthetic trends in fashion and on which platforms competitors have had success in advertising jewelry to prospective customers. Logistics include shipping products, negotiating with retailers, establishing an e-commerce presence and material and manufacturing costs. 

Bling, Incorporated advertises initially through social platforms like TikTok and Facebook, as well as with Google AdSense, with plans to eventually expand to television advertising. Revenue forecasting is structured around a low overhead on the basis of inexpensive materials, no dedicated storefront and broad reach through digital platforms.

Phaeton Custom Cars

Phaeton is a custom car builder and classic car restoration business with a regional focus and reach. Its mission statement defines it as a local, family-owned business serving a community of auto enthusiasts and a broader regional niche of collectors. 

Market analysis breaks down the location and facilities of other competitor shops in the region as well as online communities of regional car enthusiasts likely to spend money on custom modifications or restoration projects. It also examines trends in valuations for custom parts and vintage cars. Logistics include pricing out parts and labor, finding skilled or apprentice laborers and mortgaging a garage and equipment. 

Phaeton advertises in regional publications, at local events and regional car shows and online through Facebook and Instagram, with an emphasis on a social presence highlighting their flashiest builds. Revenue forecasting is built around a growing reputation and high-value commissions.

Frequently asked questions (FAQs)

A business plan may not be a prerequisite for every type of business, but there are few businesses that wouldn’t benefit from one. It can serve as an important strategic tool and help crystalize a vision of your business and its future.

Business plans do just that: they help you plan the future of your business, serve as a platform to brainstorm ideas and think through your vision and are a great tool for showcasing why your business works to potential investors or partners.

Blueprint is an independent publisher and comparison service, not an investment advisor. The information provided is for educational purposes only and we encourage you to seek personalized advice from qualified professionals regarding specific financial decisions. Past performance is not indicative of future results.

Blueprint has an advertiser disclosure policy . The opinions, analyses, reviews or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the Blueprint editorial staff alone. Blueprint adheres to strict editorial integrity standards. The information is accurate as of the publish date, but always check the provider’s website for the most current information.

Alan Bradley

Alan is an experienced culture and tech writer with a background in newspaper reporting. His work has appeared in Rolling Stone, Paste Magazine, The Escapist, PC Mag, PC Gamer, and a multitude of other outlets. He has over twenty years of experience as a journalist and editor and is the author of the urban fantasy novel The Sixth Borough.

Sierra Campbell is a small business editor for USA Today Blueprint. She specializes in writing, editing and fact-checking content centered around helping businesses. She has worked as a digital content and show producer for several local TV stations, an editor for U.S. News & World Report and a freelance writer and editor for many companies. Sierra prides herself in delivering accurate and up-to-date information to readers. Her expertise includes credit card processing companies, e-commerce platforms, payroll software, accounting software and virtual private networks (VPNs). She also owns Editing by Sierra, where she offers editing services to writers of all backgrounds, including self-published and traditionally published authors.

How to start a small business: A step-by-step guide

How to start a small business: A step-by-step guide

Business Eric Rosenberg

  • Insights & Analysis
  • Nonprofit Jobs

Conflicts of Interest

A policy governing conflicts of interests is perhaps the most important policy a nonprofit board can adopt. to have the most impact, the policy should be in writing, and the board and staff should review the policy regularly., what should a conflicts of interest policy include.

A policy on conflicts of interest should (a) require those with a conflict (or who think they may have a conflict) to  disclose  the conflict/potential conflict, and (b)  prohibit interested  board members  from voting  on any matter in which there is a conflict.

  • Beyond including those two basic directives, each nonprofit needs to determine how the board will manage the conflict.
  • Keep in mind that the  IRS Form 990  asks not only about whether the nonprofit has a written policy on conflicts of interest, but also about the process that the nonprofit uses to manage conflicts, as well as how the nonprofit determines whether board members have conflicting interests.
  • Some state laws governing nonprofit corporations include provisions describing what must be included in a nonprofit's conflict of interest policy, or how conflicts are to be managed. For example, New York law requires nonprofits to have a conflict of interest policy and the state law also provides guidance for drafting the policy, which must state that directors, officers and key employees are to act in the "best interest of the nonprofit." New York law also requires nonprofit boards to adopt a process so that board members can annually disclose potential conflicts. See  New York Nonprofit Revitalization Act of 2013 .

Conflicts that are not managed can result in significant penalties, called " intermediate sanctions, " assessed against the  person who benefits  as well as against the organization. (See IRS information on “ excess benefit transactions .”)

Practice Pointers

Often people are unaware that their activities or personal interests are in conflict with the best interests of the nonprofit so a goal for many organizations is to simply raise awareness, encourage disclosure and discussion of anything that MAY be a conflict, and constantly encourage a “culture of candor.” 

  • Conflicts can be nuanced and have more to do with a “duality of interests” than a financial conflict. Here's an example of a conflict policy that explicitly acknowledges how the nonprofit will address  duality of interests.  Read about a  3-dimensional view of conflicts  (Blue Avocado).
  • Many charitable nonprofits make it a regular practice to take time at a board meeting at least once a year to discuss the types of hypothetical situations that could result in a conflict of interest, and then discuss how the board would manage that potential conflict, role-playing, so that when a real conflict arises the board will be ready to handle it with more ease.
  • Minutes of board meetings should reflect when a board member discloses that s/he has a conflict of interests and how the conflict was managed, such as that there was a discussion on the matter without the board member in the room, and that a vote was taken but that the “interested” board member abstained (board members with a conflict are “interested” – board members without a conflict are “disinterested”). 
  •  Many nonprofits circulate a questionnaire each year to find out whether any board member (or staff member) has a conflict of interest. Typically the questionnaire asks board and staff members to disclose existing conflicts and reminds them to disclose any that may crop up in the future.

Additional Resources

  • Sample Conflicts of Interest Policies for  small nonprofits  and  large nonprofits  (Nonprofit New York)
  • Sample Conflict of Interest Policy and Annual Statement  (Montana Nonprofit Association)
  • Sample conflict of interest policy  (Public Counsel Law Center)
  • Conflicts of Interest: disclosure, monitoring, and enforcement  (Probono Partnership)
  • IRS statement on the purpose of a conflict of interest policy  (IRS)
  • State specific  Principles and Practices/Standards for Excellence®  programs may also offer guidance on conflicts of interest. 

Disclaimer: Information on this website is provided for informational purposes only and is neither intended to be nor should be construed as legal, accounting, tax, investment, or financial advice. Please consult a professional (attorney, accountant, tax advisor) for the latest and most accurate information. The National Council of Nonprofits makes no representations or warranties as to the accuracy or timeliness of the information contained herein.

IMAGES

  1. FREE 13+ Sample Nonprofit Business Plan in Google Docs

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  2. FREE 13+ Sample Nonprofit Business Plan in Google Docs

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  3. FREE 23+ Non Profit Business Plan Templates in PDF

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COMMENTS

  1. Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations - ClickUp">Business Plan Template for Nonprofit Organizations - ClickUp

    A business plan template for nonprofit organizations offers a range of benefits that help these organizations achieve their mission and make a positive impact: Clearly define and articulate the organization's mission, vision, and values; Develop a comprehensive strategy to achieve organizational goals and objectives

  2. to Write a Nonprofit Business Plan + Example [Updated 2024] - Growthink">How to Write a Nonprofit Business Plan + Example [Updated 2024] -...

    A non-profit business plan is a document that outlines the goals, strategies, and financial projections of a nonprofit organization. It can be used to attract funding from donors or investors and to track the progress of the nonprofit over time. Download our Ultimate Nonprofit Business Plan Template here.

  3. Nonprofit Business Plan Examples - Bplans">Nonprofit Business Plan Examples - Bplans

    Explore our library of Nonprofit Business Plan Templates and find inspiration for your own business.

  4. Non-Profit Business Plan Template - PDF | Word – eForms">Free Non-Profit Business Plan Template - PDF | Word – eForms

    Non-Profit Business Plan Template Updated January 09, 2023 A non-profit business plan is a written roadmap for a non-profit organization. It serves to communicate the core purpose, funding needs, and action plan of the organization.

  5. Nonprofit Organization Business Plan Template - Venngage">Nonprofit Organization Business Plan Template - Venngage

    Create and customize your non-profit business plan using Venngage’s non profit organization business plan template. Easily customize your non-profit’s business plan by modifying texts, fonts, photos, icons, and backgrounds with just a few clicks of your button.

  6. Nonprofit Startup Resources Panels - Candid Learning">Nonprofit Startup Resources Panels - Candid Learning

    Questions will assess background knowledge, capital, and work experience that are relevant to starting a nonprofit. Once the assessment is complete, the results will provide customized resources to guide your team on identifying funding, navigating the legal process, developing a business plan, and launching programs.

  7. Starting a Non-Profit Organization | Business Center One Stop - Kansas">Starting a Non-Profit Organization | Business Center One Stop -...

    One of the first steps to take to form a non-profit organization is to file formation documents with the Kansas Secretary of State. Non-profits may use Form AI to file articles of incorporation with the Secretary of State or may draft articles and file those with the Secretary of State. The filing fee for formation documents is $20.

  8. Business Plan Template (With Examples) - USA TODAY">Free Business Plan Template (With Examples) - USA TODAY

    Definition. A platform to consider every element of your business and how best to execute your plans for them. Collaboration. A synopsis of what’s exceptional about your business and a way to ...

  9. Nonprofit Corporation | National Council of Nonprofits">Dissolving a Nonprofit Corporation | National Council of ...

    Step #2 Drafting the Plan of Dissolution. If the leadership of the organization decides that winding down is the best option, the organization will need a “plan of dissolution.”. A plan of dissolution is essentially a written description of how the nonprofit intends to distribute its remaining assets and address its remaining liabilities.

  10. Nonprofits">Conflicts of Interest | National Council of Nonprofits

    Many nonprofits circulate a questionnaire each year to find out whether any board member (or staff member) has a conflict of interest. Typically the questionnaire asks board and staff members to disclose existing conflicts and reminds them to disclose any that may crop up in the future. National Council of Nonprofits.