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ESL Lesson about Superstitions

Superstitions

A fun ESL lesson about superstitions from our English learning course for ESL students. Learn vocabulary and expressions to talk about superstitions. Get the downloadable and printable worksheets, digital flashcards, listening and reading exercises, and everything you need for the perfect digital and remote English lesson when you subscribe.

Discussion Questions on Superstitions

  • Do you think some things are good luck? What?
  • Are there any things that are bad luck in your country?
  • Are there any unlucky numbers in your country? What are they?
  • Do you believe in any superstitions? What are they?
  • Do you have any good luck charms?

Vocabulary Check

especially, believe, skip, office, host, strange, mistake, decide

ESL Video on Superstitions

  • What number is missing on the panel?
  • What kind of buildings will not have this floor number?
  • What day is really unlucky in America?
  • What number is very lucky in America?
  • What is a lucky number in China?
  • What year did China host the Olympics?
  • What month did the Olympics start?
  • Is finding a penny good luck or bad luck?

Superstitions 13

Match the words on the left with words or expressions on the right that are closest in meaning.

More Discussion Questions on Superstitions

  • Do you believe there are lucky numbers? What are they?
  • Do your friends agree with your idea about lucky numbers?
  • Are four and nine lucky numbers in your country?
  • What can you do to protect yourself from bad luck?
  • What can you do to change bad luck to good?
  • When was the last time that you had good luck?
  • When was the last time you had bad luck?

superstitions esl printable flashcards

Words in Context – Fill-in-the-blanks

Use the words from the vocabulary box to complete the following sentences. You may need to modify the tense or word form.

  • Before we leave the party we should thank the _______ for organizing such a fun event!.
  • I like all kinds of food but I ____________ like Italian. I eat it at least three times a week!
  • I made a big _________ yesterday. I left a box of ice cream in the car and it melted all over my new jacket!
  • We have a lot of work to do today. We will have to _______ lunch and just work until it is dinner time.
  • If you wear only a swim suit to work people might think you are ______________.
  • My brother is a business manager. He works in a big __________ building in the middle of the city.
  • You may not ___________ me, but I just won a million dollars!
  • Server: “Are you ready to order?” Customer: “Everything looks so delicious, I can’t _________ what to order! Please give me a little more time.

Black Cat esl printable flashcards

ESL Lesson Activity on Superstitions

Fill-in-the-blanks Watch the video and complete the sentences.

Superstitions Part 1

Hey! Want to see something interesting? Check this out! Look closely at the panel showing the floors in this building. Do you see something _________?  That’s right! There isn’t a 13th floor.  Is that a mistake? Ha Ha!  No, it isn’t a __________! Here in America, the number 13 is unlucky. A lot of office buildings and ________ will skip the 13 th floor. It’s just a superstition. A superstition is something that people _______ that is not really true, like that the number 13 is an unlucky number.  Some people also believe the 13th day of the month is unlucky, especially if it is Friday, the 13th! Different _________ have different ideas about what is a lucky and unlucky number.

What number is unlucky where you’re from?

In America, 13 is an unlucky number, but in China and Japan, ________ unlucky numbers are four and nine. So, what about a lucky number in American culture? Lucky ______! Seven is a very lucky number in America! In China, a very lucky number is 8. In fact, the more eights you have the better. In 2008, China was _________ of the Olympic games.  For good luck, they decided to start games at 8:08 at night on ________ (8) eighth! 8:08pm, 8/8/’08! Now that is a lot of eights! Oh, look. A penny. Find a penny, ______ it up, and all day long you’ll have good luck! Must be my lucky day.

See you next time!

superstitions esl printable flashcards

ESL Conversation about Superstitions

Hey! Want to see something interesting? Check this out! Look closely at the panel showing the floors in this building. Do you see something strange?  That’s right!  There isn’t a 13th floor.  Is that a mistake? Ha Ha!  No, it isn’t a mistake! Here in America, the number 13 is unlucky. A lot of office buildings and hotels will skip the 13 th floor. It’s just a superstition. A superstition is something that people believe that is not really true, like that the number 13 is an unlucky number.  Some people also believe the 13th day of the month is unlucky, especially if it is Friday, the 13th! Different cultures have different ideas about what is a lucky and unlucky number. In America, 13 is an unlucky number, but in China and Japan, really unlucky numbers are four and nine. So, what about a lucky number in American culture? Lucky seven! Seven is a very lucky number in America! In China, a very lucky number is 8. In fact, the more eights you have the better. In 2008, China was host of the Olympic games.  For good luck, they decided to start games at 8:08 at night on August (8) eighth! 8:08pm, 8/8/’08! Now that is a lot of eights! Oh, look. A penny. Find a penny, pick it up, and all day long you’ll have good luck! Must be my lucky day. See you next time!

esl printable flashcards

Natural English to Talk about Superstitions

Strange = odd

There is a strange/odd smell coming from the kitchen. My sister must be trying to cook again!

really is a very common expression in natural spoken english.

really is used to make a question stronger or more important.

Is he really going to quit his job?

really is used to show interest, doubt, or surprise at what a person is saying

I’m going to quit my job and move to Alaska! Really ???

really is used to add strength to what you are saying.

I ran really really fast! I really love cats!

really is used to show sincerity

I really want to thank you for helping me with my homework!

really is also used to make an apology stronger.

I am really sorry to be late!

English Saying really and truly

really and truly is used to make a statement or opinion stronger

My boss is the best! I really and truly think he will make this company a great success.

ESL printable flashcards

www.pocketpassport.com Questions? [email protected]

Reference: WC1

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Everyday life: Superstitions

By Pete Clements

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In this lesson, available at two levels, students will discuss and read about superstitions and identify standard features of ‘clickbait’ articles and ‘listicles’.

Everyday Life: Superstitions - Intermediate Worksheet

Everyday life: superstitions - intermediate teacher's notes, everyday life: superstitions - advanced worksheet, everyday life: superstitions - advanced teacher's notes, everyday life: superstitions - advanced cutups.

  • Integrated Skills
  • Intermediate
  • Lesson Plan / Teacher's Notes
  • Mixed Ability
  • Pre-Intermediate
  • Printable Worksheet
  • Up to 45 mins
  • Up to 60 mins
  • Up to 90 mins
  • Upper-Intermediate
  • Whole Class

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Superstitions — a Talking Points lesson plan for reading, speaking & vocabulary

esl lesson superstitions

Do you have lucky or unlucky numbers in your culture? Are certain animals considered the sign of good fortune?

This lesson plan is all about superstitions. Most cultures have their own superstitions — and many people believe in these customs.

You can use this lesson plan as part of your English class or on your own for self-study. Download the full lesson plan in PDF format right now. Just click the link down below.

Table of Contents

Introduction

What superstitions exist in your country?

Do you believe in any superstitions?

Where do superstitions come from?

Sarah’s life is filled with so much concern and worry. Every day she has many things to think of and to check.

Because Sarah is obsessed with superstitions.

“I don’t regard them as superstitions at all,” she says. “I think they are real. If I don’t pay attention to them, then I know something bad will happen.”

We asked Sarah to give us an example.

“Well, take last week. It was Friday the 13th. I didn’t leave the house that day. I stayed at home and just read a book. I didn’t even turn on the news or answer the phone.”

Isn’t that a little extreme?

“I just have to be on the safe side,” she said. “Better to be safe than sorry.”

Okay, fair enough. Tell us about some other superstitions — sorry, precautions, you take.

“I have a rabbit’s foot and every morning I wake up and stroke the rabbit’s foot. I mean that’s not so unusual. Everyone has a white rabbit’s foot.”

“Maybe not everyone. But if they did, they would find their life would be much better. A rabbit’s foot is lucky.”

Not for the rabbit… How about when you go outside?

“Oh, I have to be extra careful when I am outside,” she said. “There were some workers fixing something in the street the other day. They were using a ladder. I saw people just walking under the ladder like it was no problem. I could not believe it.”

So you didn’t do that?

“No, of course not! I crossed the road to avoid it. A car had to screech to a stop when I went over the road —”

And that is lucky?

“And another thing… Our neighbour has the audacity to have a black cat. How can he be so inconsiderate? Every time I see that nasty cat I have to shoo it away in case it crosses my path. And I don’t like the way it looks at me either.”

This sounds like a full-time job. How did this all begin?

Sarah takes a deep breath.

“I think you can blame my mother for that,” she says. “When I was a child, she broke a mirror in our house. My grandmother was there, and she was very upset about it. She said: that’s seven years’ bad luck! And scolded my mum. My mum just brushed it off but from that day things have not been quite right.”

Sarah’s home is decorated tastefully but there are little signs of her superstitions. A horseshoe, a picture of a four-leaf clover, a large number 3 painted on the kitchen wall.

She also has her own little habits.

“I have a pinecone that my grandmother gave me as a child,” she says. “Every evening I hold it in both hands and look out the window and say No trouble today, no trouble tomorrow, three times.”

Does it work?

“So far so good,” says Sarah.

And how about your husband? Does he also believe in all of this?

“Oh, he left,” says Sarah, with a sad expression. “He’s gone back to his mother’s.”

Reading Comprehension Questions

Why is Sarah’s life so hectic?

How does Sarah regard superstitions?

What are some of the superstitions that Sarah talks about?

What did Sarah do last week because of a superstition she believes in?

What does Sarah do every morning?

What does she do every evening?

How does Sarah deal with going outside?

Does Sarah like her neighbour? Why/why not?

Who does Sarah blame for her belief in superstitions? Is this reasonable do you think? Who do you think is to blame? Why?

What symbols of good luck does Sarah have in her home?

What personal superstition does she have?

Do all of these things work for Sarah?

Where is her husband?

Essential Vocabulary

Write down all the words and phrases in your vocabulary notebook. Look in your dictionary

and find the meaning of each word. Write the definition next to each word.

Then make up your own sentences using each word or phrase.

For example:

Notebook — a small book with pages of blank paper that students use to make notes when

“ I left my notebook at home so I was unable to make any notes in my English class.”

Make a Superstition

We often base superstitions on animals, objects or strange occurrences. There are often very good reasons why these animals or objects have a superstition attached to them, passed down through history and folk-lore.

In the exercise, you will create a folk tale based on one of the following objects, animals or occurrences and say if it is good luck or bad luck. You can also add a fix to the superstition. For example, a saying or a physical act you must do to get rid of the bad luck or bring good luck.

Example: A horseshoe is good luck. In Ancient Greece, they made horseshoes out of iron. The Greeks believed iron to have magical powers and could ward off evil. Also, horseshoes were in the shape of the crescent moon and the Greeks regarded the crescent moon to be a time of fertility and good fortune.

Example: In England, if we see a magpie we should salute it. This is because we consider a magpie on its own to be a sign of bad luck. And many years ago there was a rank in the British army for magpie. Thus giving the magpie a salute is a sign of respect and therefore wards off the bad luck.

  • a white feather
  • a penny found on the ground
  • glasses placed upside down on the table
  • spilling some tea on a tablecloth
  • a black horse
  • you see a friend outside and you both say “hello” at the exact same time
  • a man wearing a white cap walks towards you
  • a small white dog
  • you throw half a glass of water in the sink
  • a knock at the door after nine pm
  • you drop a spoon on the floor

Discussion Questions

Are you a superstitious person? Tell the class about the superstitions you believe? Why do you believe in them?

Is there a scientific explanation for some superstitions?

In your country which numbers have good luck or bad luck? Why is this so?

Which animals in your country bring good or bad luck? Why?

Do people take superstitions very seriously in your country? Why/why not?

Are there certain dates that are considered bad luck in your culture? Why?

Have you ever been to see a fortune-teller? What did they say?

Do you have any personal superstitions? What are they?

Do you have any special prayers or sayings before flying on a plane? Why do you say these things?

In the article, do you think Sarah is superstitious? Or does she have another kind of problem? What do you think it could be?

If you were Sarah’s good friend what could you say to her?

Why did Sarah’s husband leave her? How do you think Sarah reacted?

You are Sarah’s best friend.

You are going to write a letter begging her to change the way she lives her life so that she can live a normal life and be happy.

You must be very careful and diplomatic in the way you write your letter as you do not wish to offend Sarah.

But at the same time, you need her to know the truth about all the superstitions she believes in.

What did you think of this lesson plan? Was it helpful? Let me know your thoughts in the comments below!

esl lesson superstitions

Download the full lesson plan for free. Click the link below!

Superstitions

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Superstitions

ESL superstitions

Superstitions – This post provides ESL (English as a Second Language) conversation materials and lessons focused on the topics of superstitions. The materials are designed to help learners practice and improve their English speaking skills while discussing various aspects related to superstitions and myths. By using these materials, ESL learners can develop their communication skills and gain confidence in using English.

Our ESL resources are free for everyone. We have collected the best ESL speaking practice handouts and contents for a variety of topics. The handouts and activities are online-friendly and flexible to meet all of your needs.

superstition discussion

Discussion – Superstitions

ESL speaking practice about superstitions.

Time: 30 – 45 minutes

Level: Pre-intermediate/Intermediate

superstitions handout

Speaking Lesson – Superstitions

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esl lesson superstitions

Adult ESL Lessons: Superstitions (Intermediate)

This intermediate adult ESL lesson features warm-up questions and a list of common superstitions, followed by comprehension questions, discussion questions, and a homework activity.

Download lesson as pdf

Superstitions

  • Are you superstitious? Why or why not?
  • What is the difference between superstition and science?
  • Do you believe in witches?
  • Do you believe in ghosts?
  • Have you ever seen a ghost?
  • Do you usually have good luck or bad luck?

Read about some common Western superstitions:

These are some common Western superstitions. Many of them originated during a time when there were no scientific explanations for events that happened. People used to believe in witches, magic, dragons, and fairies. There are still people who continue to believe in superstitions and live their lives according to these beliefs.

Baseball Bat : Spit on a new bat when using it for the first time to make it lucky.

Bed: It’s bad luck to put a hat on a bed.

Bell: When a bell rings, an angel has received its wings.

Cats: If a black cat crosses your path, you will have bad luck.

Clover: It’s good luck to find a four-leaf clover.

Knives: If a friend gives you a knife, you should give him/her a coin.

Ladybugs: It is bad luck to kill a ladybug.

Ladder: It’s bad luck to walk under a ladder.

Mirror: If you break a mirror, it’s seven years bad luck.

Salt: If you spill salt you must throw some over your left shoulder.

Umbrella: It’s bad luck to open an umbrella in the house.

Wood: Knock on wood anytime you mention good fortune.

Yawn: Cover your mouth so your soul doesn’t go out of your body.

Itchy Ear: Someone is talking about you.

Friday the 13 th : This day is traditionally unlucky unless you were born on it.

Comprehension Questions:  

  • What should you do to a bat to make it lucky?
  • What shouldn’t you put on a bed?
  • How can cats be unlucky?
  • What kind of clover is good luck?
  • If a friend gives you a knife, what should you give in return?
  • How can ladders be unlucky?
  • How can ladybugs be unlucky?
  • What can give you seven years bad luck?
  • If you spill salt, what should you do?
  • How can umbrellas be unlucky?
  • When should you knock on wood?
  • What should you do when you yawn?
  • What does an itchy ear mean?
  • How can Friday the 13 th be lucky?

Discussion Questions:

  • How do you feel about superstitions? Why? Are you superstitious?
  • Are you religious? Do you believe in a god?
  • What is your family’s religion? What religious things do you and your family do?
  • Why do you think people continue to believe in superstitions?
  • Do you know anyone who is very superstitious?
  • Do you know anyone who is very religious?
  • Have you ever met anyone who has seen a ghost? Where did they see it?
  • What numbers are lucky in your country? Why?
  • What numbers are unlucky in your country? Why?
  • Do you have a lucky number? What number? Why is this your lucky number?
  • What lucky things have happened to you recently?
  • What unlucky things have happened to you recently?
  • In some western countries a rabbit’s foot or a horseshoe is considered to be a lucky charm. What things are considered to be lucky charms in your country?
  • Do you carry a lucky charm? What do you do if you want to have good luck?
  • Make a list of some common superstitions in your country. Try to explain where   they came from and why people believe in them. Include lucky and unlucky things.

Superstition:

Related Posts

Adult esl lesson: urban problems (intermediate), adult esl lesson: transportation (intermediate), adult esl lesson: restaurants (intermediate).

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Just My Luck: Learning About Superstitions

guest post by Joann Wasik from The Gateway.org It’s mid-October, which means that little ghosts and goblins everywhere are gearing[…] Continue Reading

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It’s mid-October, which means that little ghosts and goblins everywhere are gearing up for a fun, sugar-fueled night of trick-or-treating on Halloween. The kids’ growing excitement is palpable, and teachers often tap into their students’ interest by offering Halloween-related crafts and projects. Students of all ages respond well to ghost stories and Gothic fiction lessons , with many middle and high school classes delving into spooky classics such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein or Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow . Still looking for something different? How about exploring the “how” and “why” behind superstitions?

The word “superstition” carries a rather negative connotation, as it refers to a belief that is not based on reason, but is, in fact, irrational. Still, superstitions are deeply rooted in human history, and persist in the 21st century. Your students can likely cite a litany of common superstitions: Break a mirror? Seven years’ bad luck! Black cats are unlucky, and don’t even think about opening an umbrella indoors. While the number 13 is considered unlucky in western cultures, many Asian cultures avoid the number four whenever possible, as its pronunciation can be the same as for the word “death”. While most people probably don’t actually believe in such superstitions, evidence of superstitions’ influence still pervades our lives on a daily basis. Most hotels, office, and apartment buildings still don’t have a 13th floor; the 14th floor immediately follows the 12th floor. Despite medical evidence to the contrary, some parents are still convinced that swimming immediately after eating will induce cramps. We still knock on wood to keep our good luck flowing, hunt for four-leaf clovers, await a groundhog’s shadow to forecast the end of winter, and make wishes on fallen eyelashes. Esteemed medical journals, too, have examined the role of superstition in daily life: A 1993 British study, for example, found a definite correlation between Friday the 13th and increased traffic accidents, where doctors saw a 52% increase in hospitalizations due to traffic accidents on Friday the 13th versus other Fridays. The doctors’ recommendations? Stay home on Friday the 13th.

This week I’ve highlighted three resources on superstitions from the Gateway’s collection. I’ll also be featuring many more lessons, resources, and activities throughout the week on our Twitter and Facebook pages – many of them for ELL students as well. Please read my colleague Peggy’s companion column (linked below) for additional resources and teaching ideas that take advantage of the spooky season.

List of Superstitions Lesson Plan Subjects: Writing, Social studies Grade: 3-5 Why do we believe in the prognostication powers of a groundhog to tell us if when winter will end? This lesson plan asks students to pick from a list of superstitions, consider where the superstition came from, and then confirm their hypothesis with research. I like that this lesson asks students to try to track down the origins of various superstitions as well as make educated guesses as to why such superstitions were created in the first place. Great lesson for honing those critical thinking skills! This lesson is offered by Flocabulary, an online learning platform that delivers educational hip-hop songs and videos to K-12 students.

Superstitions and Old Wives Tales Lesson Plan Subjects: Science, Language Arts, ESL Grade: 7-9 In this lesson, students work in small groups to develop a hypothesis and conduct the steps of the scientific method by identifying and examining superstitions and old wives’ tales. I like how this lesson takes a scientific approach to explore a subject that is based largely on folklore and unsubstantiated beliefs – a good exercise in viewing a subject from different viewpoints. This lesson, written by a teacher, is available through Seach-Document.com.

The Role of Superstition in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Subjects: English Language Arts Grade: 9-12 How does superstition have a bearing on the novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn ? Can students use the novel to investigate their own superstitions? I like how this lesson not only exercises students’ literary analysis skills, but also has them make connections between Huck’s beliefs and fears and their own. This lesson was produced by Linda Dursteler at Weber University.

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[ESL Lesson] 12 English Phrases About Superstitions and Luck

What do horseshoes, the number seven, and pots of gold all have in common?

They’re lucky!

Well, in the English language at least.

Every language and culture has superstitions to push out the bad and bring in the good ; English is no different.

Traditions change over time, so we don’t know where all lucky phrases and idioms come from. We just want all the luck we can find! So  say hello  to the language of luck.

Download: This blog post is available as a convenient and portable PDF that you can take anywhere. Click here to get a copy. (Download)

Lucky Number Seven

Seventh heaven, luck of the draw, the luck of the irish, four-leaf clover, leprechauns, rainbows and pots of gold, strike while the iron is hot, a lucky bride, old wives’ tales, knock on wood, and one more thing....

esl vocabulary luck

Everyone from gamblers (people who bet money, usually at casinos) to the very religious considers the number seven to be lucky. “ Lucky 7 ” has been a part of Western culture for centuries.

Different religions also have some lucky sevens. The Greeks and Romans believed there were seven gods and goddesses. Islam has seven holy temples. The Hebrew Bible says the world was created in seven days. The Christian New Testament describes the end of the world with seven plagues (deadly diseases) and seven angels.

You will sometimes hear English speakers talk about “ all the way to seventh heaven .” That means the highest level of good fortune or good life.

Gamblers consider seven to be very lucky if they are playing on slot machines (a casino game). Three sevens in row means a blackjack (21) and a big money win. “ Luck of the draw ” means that your good luck comes from chance, not any skill.

Card players sometimes talk about “ Lady Luck ,” a symbol of games going well for them. She is always pictured with dice-shaped earrings showing the number seven.

You will hear about “ the luck of the Irish .” That is an old superstition that Irish people (from Ireland) have more luck than others, partly because they have one of the most popular symbols of luck: the four-leaf clover.

esl vocabulary luck

The Irish say their island has more four-leaf clovers than anywhere else in the world. Clovers grow all around the globe, but the lucky charm four-leaf version does come from ancient Ireland.

Ancient Irish teachers, holy men and magicians believed carrying four-leaf clovers helped stop bad luck or evil.

Children in the Middle Ages looked for four-leaf clovers in meadows and gardens, thinking they might see a fairy nearby.

Finding a true four-leaf clover is not easy.  The odds (chances) of finding a four-leaf clover are one in 10,000.

However, you can increase your chances at “ the luck of the Irish ” by growing four-leaf clovers. Find a patch with many clovers, dig them up by the roots, and transport them to your own garden.

Around St. Patrick’s Day in English-speaking countries, you will see lots of leprechauns , little red-haired men dressed in green. Well, maybe not real leprechauns, but paper pictures will be everywhere.

Leprechauns are said to be “ looking for a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow .” That phrase is where idioms such as “ chasing the rainbow ” and   “ pot of gold ” come from.  They’re about hoping for a better life, sometimes unrealistically.

esl vocabulary luck

Horseshoes are also lucky.

A horseshoe hung over the door in the front of a house collects all the good luck passing by. Make sure the ends of the horseshoe are pointing up, or else the good luck will fall out.

Sailors even hang horseshoes in their ships to bring good luck.

Horseshoes are made of iron, and there are many superstitions about that metal. Iron is super strong and can withstand fire.

Even the blacksmiths who make the horseshoes are considered magical because they bend iron with fire. In ancient times, blacksmiths performed wedding ceremonies because they were thought to bring the bride and groom good luck.

A popular blacksmith idiom is “ Strike while the iron is hot. “   That means take your chance while you have the opportunity because you don’t know if your luck will be good later. Iron can only be bent while it is hot, not after it has cooled.

esl vocabulary luck

Some people think that a good wedding day means a happy future for the couple. There are lots of tricks and phrases to get the best good luck on one’s wedding day.

A bride who is marrying a wealthy (rich) man is said to be “ sitting pretty. ” She has time to relax and make herself beautiful. Anybody who has a time to enjoy their good fortune is described as sitting pretty.

Brides in the West have this saying: “ Wear something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue. ” That means wear something old to represent the past, something new to represent the future, something borrowed to represent happiness, and something blue to show love and purity. (If you’re interested in more English idioms with colors, check these out! )

Rain can bring good or bad luck on a wedding day, depending on the tradition. Some European traditions say rain is a blessing that washes away all bad things. Others consider rain bad luck because it messes up outdoor wedding plans. Another saying is “ Happy is the bride whom the sun shines upon.”

Here’s a great story or “ old wives ” tale: People in the southern United States sometimes bury (put in the ground) a bottle of bourbon (whiskey) a month before the wedding to prevent rain and bring good luck. “ To bury the bourbon ” means to do something to make your luck better.

Even leaving the wedding includes lots of superstitions. English Tudor tradition says that you should throw shoes at the bride and groom as they leave the church. Now, people just tie old shoes to back of the car in which the newlyweds leave the wedding.

Romans believed wheat was a symbol of fertility (able to have lots of babies), so all sorts of wheat grains were included in the wedding ceremony.  The Hebrew Bible describes the harvest as “ separating the wheat from the chaff ,” meaning separating the good from the bad.

Happy couples wanted good things, but often wheat was expensive. So Americans started to throw rice (a cheaper grain) at the bride and groom for good luck after a wedding.

That tradition has mostly gone away because rice is hard to clean up after the wedding. Americans now throw seeds, blow bubbles, and light sparklers instead.

esl vocabulary luck

This idiom about good luck is a little complicated, but it’s one you will hear often.

Let’s say you believe you did really well on a test, or that your boss is going to give you more money. You are with friends and say: “Good things are coming my way.”

That’s when you realize you may cause something bad by presuming (believing when you don’t know for sure) that you will have good luck.

Just as soon as finish your boast, you quickly add, “Knock on wood.” Then, you find something made of wood (often a table or chair nearby) and tap your knuckles on it, like how you knock on a door.

Yes, English speakers really do knock on wood . Now, you will know what it means when you hear it.

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These English phrases about luck will make you sound like an advanced English learner . So whether you are cheering for your favorite football team  or just need some good fortune, try out these lucky phrases and bring a little English language luck your way!

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esl lesson superstitions

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Popular Superstitions Around The World - Friday The Thirteenth

Superstitions, friday 13th.

Friday the 13th superstitions - A free esl lesson with online activities, by esolcourses.com. Image credits: esolcourses.com, pixabay.

Introduction

A superstition ( noun ) is a belief that certain events or things can affect people's luck.

Fridays that fall on the thirteenth day of the month are thought to be very unlucky in some cultures.

In this lesson, we are going to be looking at superstitions connected with Friday the thirteenth.

You will learn some new words, practise your listening skills, and then test what you have learnt.

Dictionary Skills Activity

Here are some of the English words we will be using in this lesson. How many of these words and expressions do you know?

Check the meaning of any words or phrases you don't know in the dictionary.

First Listening

Watch the video about Friday the thirteenth superstitions, to get a general idea of what it is about.

Listening and Writing Exercise

Read sentences 1-5 below. Can you complete the gaps in the text?.

Use the words in the word box to help you. Watch the video again to check your answers.

Millions of people around the world Friday the thirteenth. Friday the thirteenth is considered a very day in some cultures. People who believe in superstitions are said to be . Superstitious people will often anything to do with the number 13. Some people will even take the day off work and stay at home, to avoid bad !

check your answers

  1) Millions of people around the world fear Friday the thirteenth.

  2) Friday the thirteenth is considered a very unlucky day in some cultures.

  3) People who believe in superstitions are said to be superstitious .

  4) Superstitious people will often avoid anything to do with the number 13.

  5) Some people will even take the day off work and stay at home, to avoid bad luck !

Age group: teens and adults

Level: Intermediate (B1)

Topic area: folklore, culture and traditions.

Skills focus: vocabulary, writing, listening.

Grammar: first conditional.

esl lesson superstitions

25 curious superstition conversation questions

Superstition conversation questions.

Superstition is the belief that something will either bring you good luck or misfortune. These beliefs are also about fate, destiny, and the supernatural. They are usually considered to be nonsensical or illogical because they are not based on science.

This is an interesting topic for intermediate level ESL learners and above, and you will find your students will get quite engaged with the questions about superstition.

The most difficult terms on this worksheet that you may need to go over before the discussion include – break, culture, Feng Shui, direction, witchcraft, full moon, psychic, astrology, tarot, reason, and cracks.

The superstition conversation questions are –

Do you believe in anything that brings good or bad luck ? What is it?

What is something that other people believe in that you think is a superstition?

Are there any superstitions about breaking something in your culture?

Do you carry anything or keep something in your house for good luck?

Who is the most superstitious person you know? What things do they believe in?

Have you heard of any interesting superstitions from another country?

Are there any superstitions about food where you come from? What are they?

Would you say that you are a lucky or an unlucky person? Why do you think so?

What is something strange that you have seen or experienced but cannot explain?

Are any animals considered to be lucky or unlucky in your country?

Do you believe in Feng Shui? Do you care which direction your house faces? Why?

Are there any people that do witchcraft or magic in your culture? What do they do?

What is something that you can see or do that will bring you lots of good luck?

Who do you think are more superstitious, older or younger people? Why?

Have you ever seen a ghost ? Do you know somebody who has seen a ghost?

What is the luckiest thing that has ever happened to you or your family?

How do you feel about full moons ? Are these nights different from others?

Do you think that some people have psychic powers? What can these people do?

What do you think about astrology and reading tarot cards to tell the future?

Is there any number for a house or apartment floor that you would not live in?

Do you believe that your dreams have meanings? Can you give any examples?

What is your phone number? Did you choose the numbers for any reason?

Are you careful not to step on cracks when you walk? Why or why not?

Which country or culture in the world do you think is very superstitious? Why?

eyes hanging from a tree as an act of superstition

Extra activities

Once your class has completed discussing the superstition conversation questions you may want to continue with some further activities. Here are a few ideas –

  • Have your students do a research and writing project on superstitions around the world. Set them a target of say 10 of the most interesting superstitions that can find in other foreign countries.
  • Bring a copy of yesterday’s or last week’s horoscope predictions from a local newspaper. Ask your students what star signs they are and get them to evaluate how accurate the predictions were.
  • Give your students a list of superstitions that they may not have heard of and get them to guess what will happen, or whether is it good luck or bad luck if these things occur. For example, what would happen if an owl came into your house?

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THE ARTICLE

esl lesson superstitions

Superstition forces airline logo change

Superstition has forced a European airline to change its logo. New Belgian carrier Brussels Airlines had to change its 13-red-dot logo on the tail of all its planes because of a flood of complaints from passengers about the combination of thirteen red balls representing bad luck. This number is unlucky in Western culture and many would-be passengers thought it just wouldn’t do on an airplane. Airline officials were taken aback by the volume of disapproving mail they received. Particularly upset was the original logo’s designer Ronane Holt. She said the thirteen dots “looked just right” and had extra significance because the number of dots matched the destinations it flew to in Africa. The design, in the shape of a “b”, also resembled the pattern of lights on an airport runway as planes taxied before take off.

All of the airline’s planes now have to go back to their hangars for a paint job. A fourteenth red dot will be added to the top of the “b”. However, this may not go down well in China, where the number fourteen is unlucky. One-four in Mandarin sounds like the phrase "to want to die". Passengers at Brussels airport were in two minds as to whether or not they thought the fourteen-dot logo would bring better luck. Frequent business flyer Rene Charles said: “In this day and age, superstitions are a little silly. There is no logic behind them.” However, she did admit that she shared the concerns of other passengers and was happier that the newer logo has an extra dot. Brussels Airlines is the result of a merger between SN Brussels Airlines and Virgin Express. It begins flying, with the fourteen dots, on March 25.

1. SUPERSTITIONS: Students write down superstitions from their country on slips of paper (one for each superstition). The teacher writes these on the board. In pairs/groups, students guess which country the superstitions are from. Change partner(s) and talk more about the superstitions.

2. CHAT: In pairs / groups, decide which of these topics or words from the article are most interesting and which are most boring.

Superstitions / airlines / logos / red dots / the number 13 / Western culture / paint / bad luck / passengers / logic / this day and age / silly things / mergers

Have a chat about the topics you liked. For more conversation, change topics and partners frequently.

3. AIRLINE LOGOS: Go to the Internet and find different airplane logos (your teacher might bring some to class). With your partner(s) discuss the meaning of the logos. Vote on which you think are best and which you think are worst. Walk around the class and try to persuade other students your best/worst decisions are better than their decisions.

4. MY LOGO: Spend a few minutes drawing a quick sketch of a logo that you could use for yourself. Walk around the class and explain the meaning of the logo to other students. Ask for ideas and advice on how to improve your logo. Take a vote on the best ones. (The Brussels Airlines logo is on page 13 – unlucky for some.)

5. LOGIC: Look at these superstitions. Decide which are real and which are made up. With your partner(s), try to find the logic behind them. Switch partners and explain your reasons. Vote on the most likely reasons behind the superstitions.

6. NOT ME!!: Are you superstitious? Are there numbers you do not like? Are there small routines or rituals you have when taking exams? Do you have lucky charms? Write down your superstitions and discuss them with your partner(s).

7. LOGO: Spend one minute writing down all of the different words you associate with the word “logo”. Share your words with your partner(s) and talk about them. Together, put the words into different categories.

NOTE: Triskaidekophobia is the name for the fear of the number 13.

BEFORE READING / LISTENING

1. TRUE / FALSE: Look at the article’s headline and guess whether these sentences are true (T) or false (F):

2. SYNONYM MATCH: Match the following synonyms from the article:

3. PHRASE MATCH: Match the following phrases from the article (sometimes more than one combination is possible):

WHILE READING / LISTENING

GAP FILL: Put the words into the gaps in the text.

Superstition forces airline logo change  

Listen and fill in the spaces.

Superstition __________________ European airline to change its logo. New Belgian carrier Brussels Airlines had to change its 13-red-dot ______________________ its planes because of a flood of complaints from passengers about the combination of thirteen red balls representing bad luck. This number is unlucky in Western culture __________________ passengers thought it just wouldn’t do on an airplane. Airline officials __________________ the volume of disapproving mail they received. Particularly upset was the original logo’s designer Ronane Holt. She said the thirteen dots “__________________” and had extra significance because the number of dots matched the destinations it flew to in Africa. The design, in the shape of a “b”,  also resembled the pattern of lights on an airport runway as planes __________________.

All of the airline’s planes now have to go back __________________  a paint job. A fourteenth red dot will be added __________________. However, this may not go down well in China, where the number fourteen is unlucky. One-four in Mandarin __________________ "to want to die". Passengers at Brussels airport were in two minds as to whether or not they thought the fourteen-dot logo would bring better luck. Frequent business flyer Rene Charles said: “__________________, superstitions are a little silly. There is no logic behind them.” However, she did admit that __________________ other passengers and was happier that the newer logo has an extra dot. Brussels Airlines __________________ merger between SN Brussels Airlines and Virgin Express. It begins flying, with the fourteen dots, on March 25.

AFTER READING / LISTENING

1. WORD SEARCH: Look in your dictionaries / computer to find collocates, other meanings, information, synonyms … for the words ‘bad’ and ‘luck’ .

2. ARTICLE QUESTIONS: Look back at the article and write down some questions you would like to ask the class about the text.

3. GAP FILL: In pairs / groups, compare your answers to this exercise. Check your answers. Talk about the words from the activity. Were they new, interesting, worth learning…?

4. VOCABULARY: Circle any words you do not understand. In groups, pool unknown words and use dictionaries to find their meanings.

5. STUDENT “SUPERSTITIONS” SURVEY: In pairs / groups, write down questions about superstitions.

6. TEST EACH OTHER: Look at the words below. With your partner, try to recall exactly how these were used in the text:

STUDENT A’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student B)

--------------------------------------------------------------------

STUDENT B’s QUESTIONS (Do not show these to student A)

AFTER DISCUSSION: Join another partner / group and tell them what you talked about.

YOUR AIRLINE: In pairs / groups. You are starting a new airline. Fill in the details of the table together.

CORRECT WORD: Put the correct words from a–d below in the article.

Superstition has (1) ____ a European airline to change its logo. New Belgian carrier Brussels Airlines had to change its 13-red-dot logo on the tail of all its planes because of a (2) ____ of complaints from passengers about the combination of thirteen red balls representing bad luck. This number is unlucky in Western culture and many (3) ____  passengers thought it just wouldn’t do on an airplane. Airline officials were (4) ____ aback by the volume of disapproving mail they received. Particularly upset was the original logo’s designer Ronane Holt. She said the thirteen dots “looked just right” and had extra significance because the number of dots matched the destinations it (5) ____ to in Africa. The design, in the shape of a “b”,  also resembled the pattern of lights on an airport runway as planes (6) ____ before take off.

All of the airline’s planes now have to go back to their (7) ____ for a paint job. A fourteenth red dot will be added to the top of the “b”. However, this may not go (8) ____ well in China, where the number fourteen is unlucky. One-four in Mandarin sounds like the phrase "to want to die". Passengers at Brussels airport were (9) ____ two minds as to whether or not they thought the fourteen-dot logo would bring better luck. Frequent business flyer Rene Charles said: “In this day and (10) ____, superstitions are a little silly. There is no logic behind them.” However, she did (11) ____ that she shared the concerns of other passengers and was happier that the newer logo has an extra dot. Brussels Airlines is the result (12) ____  a merger between SN Brussels Airlines and Virgin Express. It begins flying, with the fourteen dots, on March 25.

1. VOCABULARY EXTENSION: Choose several of the words from the text. Use a dictionary or Google’s search field (or another search engine) to build up more associations / collocations of each word.

2. INTERNET: Search the Internet and find more information about the Brussels Airlines logo story. Talk about what you discover with your partner(s) in the next lesson.

3. AIRLINE LOGO POSTER: Make a poster showing airline logos. Make sure you write a description and history of the logos. Show your poster to your class in the next lesson. Vote on the best one

4. MAGAZINE ARTICLE: Write a magazine article about how superstitions affect people’s lives. Read what you wrote to your classmates in the next lesson. Which article was best and why?

5. LETTER: Write a letter to the CEO of Brussels Airlines. Tell him/her what you think about the airline adding an extra dot. Ask him/her three questions. Give him/her three pieces of advice. Read your letter to your partner(s) in your next lesson. Your partner(s) will answer your questions.

6. SURVEY: Ask all the people you know about their superstitions. Write a short report. Read your report to your classmates in your next lesson.

TRUE / FALSE:

SYNONYM MATCH:

PHRASE MATCH:

Superstition has forced a European airline to change its logo. New Belgian carrier Brussels Airlines had to change its 13-red-dot logo on the tail of all its planes because of a flood of complaints from passengers about the combination of thirteen red balls representing bad luck. This number is unlucky in Western culture and many would-be passengers thought it just wouldn’t do on an airplane. Airline officials were taken aback by the volume of disapproving mail they received. Particularly upset was the original logo’s designer Ronane Holt. She said the thirteen dots “looked just right ” and had extra significance because the number of dots matched the destinations it flew to in Africa. The design, in the shape of a “b”,  also resembled the pattern of lights on an airport runway as planes taxied before take off.

All of the airline’s planes now have to go back to their hangars for a paint job. A fourteenth red dot will be added to the top of the “b”. However, this may not go down well in China, where the number fourteen is unlucky. One-four in Mandarin sounds like the phrase "to want to die". Passengers at Brussels airport were in two minds as to whether or not they thought the fourteen-dot logo would bring better luck. Frequent business flyer Rene Charles said: “In this day and age , superstitions are a little silly. There is no logic behind them.” However, she did admit that she shared the concerns of other passengers and was happier that the newer logo has an extra dot. Brussels Airlines is the result of a merger between SN Brussels Airlines and Virgin Express. It begins flying, with the fourteen dots, on March 25.

LANGUAGE WORK

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LESSON PLAN FOR ENGLISH TEACHERS

Superstition causes plane delay.

esl lesson superstitions

Level: Intermediate (B1-B2)

Type of English: General English

Tags: breaking news beliefs, religion and superstition behaviour, feelings and emotions health and wellbeing plans and arrangements travel and leisure Vocabulary lesson

Publication date: 05/05/2021

This audio-aided lesson looks at a news report on a Chinese man throwing coins into a plane engine for good luck due to superstition. There is also a blog article, where two people talk about superstitions and where they come from. Exercises focus on related vocabulary, listening and readings skills and comprehension.

by Joe Wilson

esl lesson superstitions

superstition_plane_be.mp3

Another great lesson! Thank you Joe!

Very good 5* Thank you!

Great lesson! It was interesting and challenging enough for my advanced students.

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This audio-aided lesson looks at a news report on a Chinese man throwing coins into a plane engine for good luck due to superstition. There is also a blog article where two people talk about superstitions and where they come from. Exercises focus on related vocabulary, listening and readings skills, and comprehension.

superstition_plane_ame.mp3

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ESL Superstitions Unveiled Lesson Plan [Free PDF]

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Table of Contents

Introduction

The ESL Superstitions Unveiled Lesson Plan is designed to engage students in a captivating exploration of superstitions and their cultural significance. This lesson plan aims to broaden students’ vocabulary, improve their listening and speaking skills, and encourage critical thinking. By delving into the world of superstitions, students will not only gain insight into different cultural beliefs but also develop a deeper understanding of language usage and context. This topic provides an excellent opportunity for students to explore language in a fun and intriguing manner, making it an essential addition to any ESL curriculum.

Vocabulary Building

Esl warm-up activity.

To kick off the ESL Superstitions Unveiled Lesson Plan, start with an engaging warm-up activity. Begin by asking students to share any superstitions they have heard of or believe in. Encourage them to explain the origins and reasons behind these superstitions. This will not only pique their interest but also set the tone for the lesson, creating a lively and interactive atmosphere. Additionally, you can introduce some common superstitions from different cultures and ask students to discuss their thoughts on these beliefs. This activity will effectively capture students’ attention and prepare them for an intriguing exploration of superstitions.

Main ESL Lesson Activities

Vocabulary activity: superstition charades.

Divide the class into small groups and provide each group with a list of superstitions. One student from each group will act out the superstition without speaking, while the others guess what it is. This activity will reinforce vocabulary related to superstitions and encourage teamwork.

Listening Activity: Superstition Storytelling

Play recordings or read out stories related to superstitions from different cultures. Afterward, facilitate a discussion about the stories, encouraging students to share their thoughts and interpretations. This activity will enhance listening skills and promote critical thinking.

Roleplay Activity: Superstition Debates

Assign students different superstitions to defend or debunk in a structured debate format. This activity will not only improve speaking skills but also foster analytical thinking and persuasive communication.

Reading and Writing Activity: Superstition Reflections

Provide students with written accounts of personal experiences with superstitions. Ask them to reflect on these accounts in writing, expressing their opinions and beliefs about superstitions. This activity will strengthen reading comprehension and encourage self-expression through writing.

ESL Homework Assignment

Task students with researching and presenting a superstition from a culture different from their own. They should explore the origins, beliefs, and cultural significance of the chosen superstition. This assignment will reinforce the lesson content and encourage independent learning and cross-cultural understanding.

Summary of Key Points

Throughout this lesson, students have explored various superstitions, delved into different cultural beliefs, and enhanced their vocabulary related to this topic. They have also practiced listening, speaking, and critical thinking skills through engaging activities.

Reflection and Application

Encourage students to reflect on how learning about superstitions has expanded their language skills and cultural awareness. Prompt them to consider how the vocabulary, listening practice, and discussions can be applied in real-life language situations. This reflection will help students recognize the practical value of the lesson in their language development journey.

Why this topic is great for ESL learning

Exploring superstitions in an ESL learning environment offers numerous benefits for language development.

Cultural Understanding

Studying superstitions allows students to gain insights into different cultures and their beliefs. This promotes cultural understanding and empathy, helping students appreciate the diversity of human experiences.

Vocabulary Expansion

The ESL Superstitions Unveiled Lesson Plan introduces students to a range of vocabulary related to superstitions, beliefs, and traditions. By learning these terms, students expand their vocabulary repertoire and improve their ability to express themselves accurately and fluently.

Listening and Speaking Skills

Engaging in discussions about superstitions encourages students to practice their listening and speaking skills. They learn to express opinions, share personal experiences, and engage in meaningful conversations with their peers.

Critical Thinking

Analyzing superstitions requires critical thinking skills as students evaluate the reasons behind these beliefs. They learn to question assumptions, consider different perspectives, and develop their own logical reasoning abilities.

Language Context

Superstitions provide rich language context that helps students understand idiomatic expressions, figurative language, and cultural references. This enhances their overall comprehension skills and enables them to navigate real-life conversations more effectively.

By incorporating the ESL Superstitions Unveiled Lesson Plan into the curriculum, educators can create an engaging learning experience that fosters language development while promoting cultural awareness and critical thinking skills.

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Preview of Superstitions - What does science say?  ESL  adults PPT no-prep lesson

Superstitions - What does science say? ESL adults PPT no-prep lesson

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Superstitions bundle - cross culture, ESL adult and teen power point lesson

Preview of ESL/EFL Intermediate Lesson Plan: First Conditional - Superstitions

ESL /EFL Intermediate Lesson Plan: First Conditional - Superstitions

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American Superstitions (Friday the 13th Lesson) Bundle for ESOL

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Superstitions in the U.S: ESOL Friday the 13th Google™ Lesson

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Preview of ESL Advanced Intermediate Class 35: Superstitions

ESL Advanced Intermediate Class 35: Superstitions

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Superstitions Balderdash - EFL ESL - Conversation Speaking Game

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Preview of St. Patrick's Day Readings 13 Superstitions in English Gallery Walk - ESL / ELL

St. Patrick's Day Readings 13 Superstitions in English Gallery Walk - ESL / ELL

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Preview of Superstitions quiz– a no prep lesson for ESL adult English conversation

Superstitions quiz– a no prep lesson for ESL adult English conversation

Preview of First Conditional Activity Pack Charts, Chain Stories, Superstitions, Chores ESL

First Conditional Activity Pack Charts, Chain Stories, Superstitions , Chores ESL

esl lesson superstitions

Halloween – Fear & Superstition ESL Adult English conversation in power-point

Preview of Superstitions - What does science say?  ESL adults no-prep lesson.

Superstitions - What does science say? ESL adults no-prep lesson.

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Preview of Superstition | ESL/ELL/ELA Speaking and Writing Activities | For Teens | BUNDLE

Superstition | ESL /ELL/ELA Speaking and Writing Activities | For Teens | BUNDLE

esl lesson superstitions

Superstitions ESL Lesson Plan

esl lesson superstitions

Superstitions quiz– a no prep lesson for ESL adult English conversation.

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ESL - Superstitions

esl lesson superstitions

EFL Advanced Speaking - Superstition

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Talking about superstitions - ADULT ESL - Level C1/C2

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ESL Lesson Plan PowerPoint - Superstition - Reading Speaking B1 B2

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First Conditional Superstitions for ESL /ELL

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Ted Talk Superstitions ESL Worksheet

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Superstitions Reading Passage: Informational Text, Writing Prompt, Word Puzzles

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Halloween | Superstitions , Reading, Writing and ELA Activities

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 English Discussion on  Superstitions

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THE DISCUSSION ON SUPERSTITIONS

STUDENT A's QUESTIONS (Do not show these to Student B.)

STUDENT B's QUESTIONS (Do not show these to Student A.)

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  2. Superstitions About Our Bodies

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COMMENTS

  1. ESL Lesson about Superstitions

    A fun ESL lesson about superstitions from our English learning course for ESL students. Learn vocabulary and expressions to talk about superstitions. Get the downloadable and printable worksheets, digital flashcards, listening and reading exercises, and everything you need for the perfect digital and remote English lesson when you subscribe.

  2. Everyday life: Superstitions

    In this lesson, available at two levels, students will discuss and read about superstitions and identify standard features of 'clickbait' articles and 'listicles'. Downloads Click link to download and view these files Everyday Life: Superstitions - Intermediate Worksheet PDF, Size 0.84 mb Everyday Life: Superstitions - Intermediate Teacher's Notes

  3. 50 Superstitions English ESL worksheets pdf & doc

    1010 uses sylwia12488 SUPERSTITIONS talk about superstitions 968 uses sriparna123 Superstitions This activity has different questions on superstitions and some vocabulary. Practice speaking with this questionnaire.Hope you find it helpfu... 762 uses burabzon61 SUPERSTITIONS It is a quiz which I applied at the end of the unit.

  4. Superstitions

    Introduction What superstitions exist in your country? Do you believe in any superstitions? Where do superstitions come from? Reading Sarah's life is filled with so much concern and worry. Every day she has many things to think of and to check. Why? Because Sarah is obsessed with superstitions.

  5. Superstitions -Free English handouts

    Superstitions Superstitions - This post provides ESL (English as a Second Language) conversation materials and lessons focused on the topics of superstitions. The materials are designed to help learners practice and improve their English speaking skills while discussing various aspects related to superstitions and myths.

  6. Adult ESL Lessons: Superstitions (Intermediate)

    This intermediate adult ESL lesson features warm-up questions and a list of common superstitions, followed by comprehension questions, discussion questions, and a homework activity. Download lesson as pdf Superstitions Are you superstitious? Why or why not? What is the difference between superstition and science? Do you believe in witches?

  7. Superstition: ESL/EFL Lesson Plan and Worksheet

    60 min Superstition Share Level: Upper-intermediate (B2-C1) Type of English: General English Tags: beliefs, religion and superstition passive voice Article based Publication date: 11/07/2012 This lesson is suitable for any time of the year, but ideal on a Friday the 13th.

  8. Talking about Superstitions

    Talking about Superstitions | Learn English through Culture | ESL Lesson about Superstitions Learn English by Pocket Passport 110K subscribers Join Subscribe Subscribed Share 40K views 4...

  9. ESL Lesson Plans For Teachers Topic: Beliefs, Religion And Superstition

    ESL Lesson Plans For Teachers Topic: Beliefs, Religion And Superstition - Linguahouse.com ESL Worksheets Search Lessons ESL Worksheets for Teachers Topic Check out our selection of worksheets filed under Topic: Beliefs, Religion And Superstition. Use the search filters on the left to refine your search. American english British english

  10. Good Luck and Bad: Secure the Former With These ESL Activities

    How to Teach Superstitions in Your ESL CLassroom 1 You Know What They Say Start the lesson with a class discussion about superstition. Ask if anyone in your class is familiar with that word and, if so, ask them to share what they know.

  11. Just My Luck: Learning About Superstitions

    Superstitions and Old Wives Tales Lesson Plan Subjects: Science, Language Arts, ESL Grade: 7-9 In this lesson, students work in small groups to develop a hypothesis and conduct the steps of the scientific method by identifying and examining superstitions and old wives' tales.

  12. 15 Superstitions English ESL video lessons

    15 Superstitions English ESL video lessons. SORT BY. Most popular. TIME PERIOD. All-time. Kerikri. Superstitions. To revise vocabulary. 581 uses. sabrina9999. 8 Strange Athlete Su. Sport and Superstiti. ... 13 Superstitions Fro. Intermediate (B1) Mu. 1874 uses. Desiree0111. The Weirdest Superst. This is a warm-up fo. 116 uses. matsu. ATP Tennis ...

  13. [ESL Lesson] 12 English Phrases About Superstitions and Luck

    Sailors even hang horseshoes in their ships to bring good luck. Horseshoes are made of iron, and there are many superstitions about that metal. Iron is super strong and can withstand fire. Even the blacksmiths who make the horseshoes are considered magical because they bend iron with fire.

  14. Superstitions

    Superstitions Discussion Starters Int Teens & Adults Grades 9-12 Students read about various superstitions and share superstitions from their own cultures. The lesson includes vocabulary review activities and discussion questions. Launch Tasks Open PDF Focus topic-based 4-skills luck culture sharing information expressing opinions first conditional

  15. Intermediate English

    A lesson about Friday the 13th superstitions for English language learners, with example sentences, reading, listening and writing activities, and a follow-up quiz on the song Superstition, by Stevie Wonder. Browse our site for many more free online English word games, vocabulary quizzes, lesson activities and worksheets for learners at all levels of English, and free lesson resources for ELT ...

  16. 25 curious superstition conversation questions

    ESL Conversation Questions Download pdf Superstition conversation questions Superstition is the belief that something will either bring you good luck or misfortune. These beliefs are also about fate, destiny, and the supernatural. They are usually considered to be nonsensical or illogical because they are not based on science.

  17. Common Superstitions

    In this video, you will learn about some of the most common superstitions people believe in. You can expect to learn some interesting facts in addition to key vocabulary about good and bad luck. I explain the vocabulary in a clear and understandable way and I have also included a useful vocabulary section.

  18. Breaking News English ESL Lesson Plan on Superstition

    1. SUPERSTITIONS: Students write down superstitions from their country on slips of paper (one for each superstition). The teacher writes these on the board. In pairs/groups, students guess which country the superstitions are from. Change partner (s) and talk more about the superstitions. 2.

  19. Superstition causes plane delay: ESL/EFL Lesson Plan and Worksheet

    This audio-aided lesson looks at a news report on a Chinese man throwing coins into a plane engine for good luck due to superstition. There is also a blog article, where two people talk about superstitions and where they come from. Exercises focus on related vocabulary, listening and readings skills and comprehension. by Joe Wilson

  20. Superstition The magazine for English language teachers

    Large collection of superstition resources English conversation & vocabulary lesson plan Superstition lesson plan Superstition - News lesson plan Superstition - Song lesson plan Medical Myths - News lesson plan Superstitions - Going to predictions

  21. ESL Questions About Superstitions

    Let's explore some popular superstitions and their meanings. See also ESL Questions About Occasions. 1. Superstitions: Beliefs or practices that are based on luck or fate rather than scientific evidence. 2. Cultures: The customs, beliefs, arts, and way of life of a particular group of people. 3.

  22. ESL Superstitions Unveiled Lesson Plan [Free PDF]

    The ESL Superstitions Unveiled Lesson Plan is designed to engage students in a captivating exploration of superstitions and their cultural significance. This lesson plan aims to broaden students' vocabulary, improve their listening and speaking skills, and encourage critical thinking. By delving into the world of superstitions, students will ...

  23. Superstitions Esl Teaching Resources

    Browse superstitions esl resources on Teachers Pay Teachers, a marketplace trusted by millions of teachers for original educational resources.

  24. 13 Superstitions From Around The Wor…: English ESL video lessons

    13 Superstitions From Around The World rosagitzel 1876 1 0 0 Let's do English ESL deep listening: focus on meaning. Intermediate (B1) Multiple choice options and order the sentence options for students

  25. ESL Discussions Lesson on Superstitions

    (1) What do you think about superstition? (2) How do you think some superstitions started? (3) What is your opinion of superstitious people? (4) Are there any actions that can bring bad luck (such as walking under a ladder, breaking a mirror, spilling salt, etc.)? (5) What symbols in your culture bring good luck? Why is that? (6)