Is it time to get rid of homework? Mental health experts weigh in.

homework makes me depressed

It's no secret that kids hate homework. And as students grapple with an ongoing pandemic that has had a wide range of mental health impacts, is it time schools start listening to their pleas about workloads?

Some teachers are turning to social media to take a stand against homework. 

Tiktok user @misguided.teacher says he doesn't assign it because the "whole premise of homework is flawed."

For starters, he says, he can't grade work on "even playing fields" when students' home environments can be vastly different.

"Even students who go home to a peaceful house, do they really want to spend their time on busy work? Because typically that's what a lot of homework is, it's busy work," he says in the video that has garnered 1.6 million likes. "You only get one year to be 7, you only got one year to be 10, you only get one year to be 16, 18."

Mental health experts agree heavy workloads have the potential do more harm than good for students, especially when taking into account the impacts of the pandemic. But they also say the answer may not be to eliminate homework altogether.

Emmy Kang, mental health counselor at Humantold , says studies have shown heavy workloads can be "detrimental" for students and cause a "big impact on their mental, physical and emotional health."

"More than half of students say that homework is their primary source of stress, and we know what stress can do on our bodies," she says, adding that staying up late to finish assignments also leads to disrupted sleep and exhaustion.

Cynthia Catchings, a licensed clinical social worker and therapist at Talkspace , says heavy workloads can also cause serious mental health problems in the long run, like anxiety and depression. 

And for all the distress homework  can cause, it's not as useful as many may think, says Dr. Nicholas Kardaras, a psychologist and CEO of Omega Recovery treatment center.

"The research shows that there's really limited benefit of homework for elementary age students, that really the school work should be contained in the classroom," he says.

For older students, Kang says, homework benefits plateau at about two hours per night. 

"Most students, especially at these high achieving schools, they're doing a minimum of three hours, and it's taking away time from their friends, from their families, their extracurricular activities. And these are all very important things for a person's mental and emotional health."

Catchings, who also taught third to 12th graders for 12 years, says she's seen the positive effects of a no-homework policy while working with students abroad.

"Not having homework was something that I always admired from the French students (and) the French schools, because that was helping the students to really have the time off and really disconnect from school," she says.

The answer may not be to eliminate homework completely but to be more mindful of the type of work students take home, suggests Kang, who was a high school teacher for 10 years.

"I don't think (we) should scrap homework; I think we should scrap meaningless, purposeless busy work-type homework. That's something that needs to be scrapped entirely," she says, encouraging teachers to be thoughtful and consider the amount of time it would take for students to complete assignments.

The pandemic made the conversation around homework more crucial 

Mindfulness surrounding homework is especially important in the context of the past two years. Many students will be struggling with mental health issues that were brought on or worsened by the pandemic , making heavy workloads even harder to balance.

"COVID was just a disaster in terms of the lack of structure. Everything just deteriorated," Kardaras says, pointing to an increase in cognitive issues and decrease in attention spans among students. "School acts as an anchor for a lot of children, as a stabilizing force, and that disappeared."

But even if students transition back to the structure of in-person classes, Kardaras suspects students may still struggle after two school years of shifted schedules and disrupted sleeping habits.

"We've seen adults struggling to go back to in-person work environments from remote work environments. That effect is amplified with children because children have less resources to be able to cope with those transitions than adults do," he explains.

'Get organized' ahead of back-to-school

In order to make the transition back to in-person school easier, Kang encourages students to "get good sleep, exercise regularly (and) eat a healthy diet."

To help manage workloads, she suggests students "get organized."

"There's so much mental clutter up there when you're disorganized. ... Sitting down and planning out their study schedules can really help manage their time," she says.

Breaking up assignments can also make things easier to tackle.

"I know that heavy workloads can be stressful, but if you sit down and you break down that studying into smaller chunks, they're much more manageable."

If workloads are still too much, Kang encourages students to advocate for themselves.

"They should tell their teachers when a homework assignment just took too much time or if it was too difficult for them to do on their own," she says. "It's good to speak up and ask those questions. Respectfully, of course, because these are your teachers. But still, I think sometimes teachers themselves need this feedback from their students."

More: Some teachers let their students sleep in class. Here's what mental health experts say.

More: Some parents are slipping young kids in for the COVID-19 vaccine, but doctors discourage the move as 'risky'

Can Excessive Homework Cause Depression? – 17 Reasons

Does Homework Cause Depression

Does Homework Cause Depression?

You or a loved one may currently be struggling with excessive amounts of homework and are wondering if can homework cause depression. The short answer is that depression can absolutely lead to depression for a variety of reasons. Identifying the cause of your homework-related depression below is the first step toward bettering your mental health. Excessive homework, lack of social support, and perfectionism are just a few of the reasons homework can lead to depression.

Reasons Why Homework Might Cause Depression:

1) multiple hours of homework.

Starting in high school, or sometimes even middle school, students begin to slowly receive more and more hours of homework. There are various reasons why multiple hours of homework per week might lead students to depression, with stress and procrastination being at the top. Certain subjects, such as mathematics or science-related classes (i.e. chemistry) might also be challenging for some students to comprehend, leading them to feel drowned in stress and procrastination. Many hours of homework on a subject that one does not understand may start as stress and procrastination, but across multiple weeks or months may gradually turn into strong feelings of inadequacy and ultimately depression.

2) Extracurricular Activities May Interfere

Only some people in high school are distinguished academics capable of effortlessly finishing hours of homework each week. Other students are naturally gifted in different areas, such as athletics, arts (such as music or drawing), or even gaming! However, these activities can also get in the way of valuable time each student needs to complete homework and be successful in school. If the student prioritizes extracurricular activities significantly more than homework, this certainly can have negative mental health consequences. Ultimately, a school/leisure balance is key when it comes to avoiding student depression and maintaining overall happiness and success!

3) Excessive Homework From Classes or Teachers

Certain subjects or teachers might also be prone to assign excessive homework that might initially be daunting. For example, mathematics, chemistry, and physics are examples of classes that high school students find both challenging and overwhelming. If these classes are not already difficult enough, a bad professor might add excessive homework that is clearly not necessary for the student’s growth. The combination of excessive homework and poor teachers can easily lead students to mild depression over time.

4) Prior Struggles With Mental Health Issues

Mental health issues in the United States and across the world are higher now than at any point in much of human history. This means that many students already have mild to severe forms of depression, anxiety, PTSD, and other mental health issues. When students receive homework that they feel incapable of completing with little to no support outside school, this may only worsen their mental health. Unfortunately, depression is only one of many mental health issues students may face when confronted with challenging homework.

5) The Sleep Deprivation Cycle

Many students, especially in high school and college, naturally prefer to stay up late and wake up late. These individuals are commonly referred to as “night owls” since they mostly thrive at night. Being a “night owl” is not an inherent problem until the student’s sleep begins to fall below the recommended range of 7-9 hours per night. Sleep deprivation is defined as “a state caused by inadequate quality or quantity of sleep.”

Although side effects of sleep deprivation depend on a few factors, depression is one of the most common. Students might feel stressed during the day and procrastinate until night when they make the logical decision to stay up and finally complete the homework for the following day. This is the day-to-day reality for many students since they have yet to break the sleep deprivation-depression cycle.

6) Concern With Getting Good Grades

Although getting good grades is applauded by almost everyone ranging from students and parents to teachers and principals, some students take it to the extreme. Perfectionism is the need to appear perfect, which might be reflected by extremely good grades or high GPAs (that are often unrealistic or unnecessary). Most colleges do not require students to have anywhere near perfect good grades or GPAs, meaning students should set realistic goals while still making it possible to achieve long-term goals. Setting realistic goals for good grades can also lead students to minimize stress, depression, and other negative effects that come with perfectionism.

7) Physical Health Problems

Some students might also suffer from physical health problems that are either genetic (such as Type I Diabetes) or behavioral health problems (such as obesity). In the case of a young student with obesity, his or her most difficult class might be the physical exercise (PE) class. This student might look at other students performing the daily physical activity for class and feel a sense of inadequacy that can grow over time and lead to depression, especially if not properly addressed or guided.

There is also a slew of other physical health problems that might contribute to a student’s struggle and depression when in school. These health problems might also make it difficult for students to complete homework when away from school, due to a variety of factors.

8) Weight Loss Problems (Homework Cause Depression)

Weight loss may occur when students are overly focused on school and have little to no time to eat a highly nutritious meal. Since food gives energy to the brain and is responsible for many vital functions of the human body, it is no wonder why depression might arise out of weight loss. In addition, many students, particularly young female students, go through a time that challenges their self-image. Other students and social media might pressure these students into conforming to non-realistic beauty standards via weight loss.

9) Young Adults and Lack of Balance

High schoolers and college students are still very young in the grand scheme of life, with many lacking the crucial ability to balance school and homework with other parts of their lives. Especially with the amount of homework some classes assign, students might not balance enough time that is necessary to complete the assigned work. Students might spend much time procrastinating homework and doing fun, but less productive activities, such as playing sports or video games. Mental health counselors (either at school or in a clinical setting) can be extremely effective at helping students manage school work and ultimately avoid depression.

10) Homework and Test Scores

High schoolers and older students must find enough time to complete homework and study to get optimal test scores. Although this does vary from class to class, most individuals will have at least a few classes where balancing homework and testing is critical for success. Test anxiety is a big factor that might lead students to heavily prioritize studying for an exam instead of completing homework. If students are overly concerned with test scores and neglect to complete assigned homework, depressive symptoms may occur.

11) The Importance of Time Management

As mentioned earlier, young children or young people, in general, might often struggle to effectively complete a lot of homework. Building daily habits around homework completion for just 30 minutes per day can add up to make a massive difference (that is 4.5 hours by the end of the school week!). Not only does effective time management make it easier to complete homework, but it also removes much of the stress, procrastination, and even depression that might come as a result of little to no time management.

For younger children or even high schoolers, an adult role model can significantly help develop these necessary habits sooner rather than later.

12) Prestigious Schools Like Stanford University

High schoolers looking to get accepted into prestigious colleges like Stanford University, or college students already in prestigious schools likely have higher chances to suffer from homework-related depression. High schoolers that are accepted into Stanford University have an average GPA of 3.95 out of 4.00.

This means students trying to get into ivy league schools hold themselves to an extreme standard. This extreme standard will inevitably cause a lack of sleep, depression, and a variety of other negative effects. This does not mean that it is impossible to successfully be accepted into Stanford University, it just means it will be very challenging.

13) Teachers Assign Busy Work

Sometimes teachers (mostly in high school) assign work that is repetitive, not super challenging, and time-consuming to complete. These types of assignments are generally referred to as “busy work,” and can be the bane of some high schoolers’ existence. The problem with busy work is that students begin to focus on the completion of the homework due to the sheer amount of time they know it will take to complete it. This takes away from the overall learning experience of the student and will lead many high school students to procrastinate. Procrastination can lead to piled-up homework and can have a negative impact on the student’s depression levels. Ultimately, teachers that assign busy homework cause depression.

14) Family Stress at Home (Homework Cause Depression)

Sometimes the cause of depression is much deeper than meets the eye, with homework simply exacerbating these untouched issues. One deeper issue revolves around family members and the lack of much-needed social support from parents, siblings, and other family members in the household. These family members might simply be unwilling to provide homework support to young adults, or the issue might be as bad as mental or physical abuse. If you know someone that is being abused, please seek help immediately to help them in the long run. It is clear that these issues could easily lead one to depression.

15) Lack of Friendships and Social Life

Being isolated at school and/or at home might be one of the risk factors for developing depression from homework. Friendships can be mutually beneficial when completing tasks such as homework since students are able to check each others’ work and reduce the overall stress of heavy workloads. Students that always seem to be alone or are even bullied might be at an increased risk of serious mental health problems. It is true that some young people and older students work best alone, but this is definitely a warning sign to keep an eye out for if you are a parent.

Putting isolated students into a club or sport they have an initial interest in might be a fantastic way to help them create valuable bonds with those around them and prevent depression!

16) Social Media and Student Well-Being

Social media is something that has had clear negative effects on the mental health of many age groups in the United States but also across the world. Social media often promotes the action of comparing one’s self to others, which might be academic success in this case. Individuals that are constantly watching other students succeed online may feel like they are the only one that does not understand the course material.

The amount of time spent on social media can also often take away from time that high schoolers could be spent completing homework and other important things. Ultimately, social media is best, like many things, when consumed in moderation and is not used to negatively compare oneself with others.

17) Stomach Problems Such as Celiac Disease

Stomach problems include, but are not limited to celiac disease, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), lactose intolerance, and constipation or gas. Most of these stomach problems have nausea and even vomiting as some of their primary negative effects. Attempting to do homework or even come to school when having severe nausea is challenging, to say the least. Students with these issues will often have less time as a result, and may even feel as though homework cause depression.

From the list above, there are many clear reasons why excessive homework assignments might lead a student of any age to depression. If you or someone you know struggles with severe depression, please seek professional help. Although there are many ways homework can cause depression, we are strong and capable of overcoming the depression and still achieving success. Ultimately, social support from family and friends, academic guidance, and a consistent homework routine are just a few of the things that might help reduce depression caused by homework.

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August 16, 2021

Is it time to get rid of homework? Mental health experts weigh in

by Sara M Moniuszko

homework

It's no secret that kids hate homework. And as students grapple with an ongoing pandemic that has had a wide-range of mental health impacts, is it time schools start listening to their pleas over workloads?

Some teachers are turning to social media to take a stand against homework .

Tiktok user @misguided.teacher says he doesn't assign it because the "whole premise of homework is flawed."

For starters, he says he can't grade work on "even playing fields" when students' home environments can be vastly different.

"Even students who go home to a peaceful house, do they really want to spend their time on busy work? Because typically that's what a lot of homework is, it's busy work," he says in the video that has garnered 1.6 million likes. "You only get one year to be 7, you only got one year to be 10, you only get one year to be 16, 18."

Mental health experts agree heavy work loads have the potential do more harm than good for students, especially when taking into account the impacts of the pandemic. But they also say the answer may not be to eliminate homework altogether.

Emmy Kang, mental health counselor at Humantold, says studies have shown heavy workloads can be "detrimental" for students and cause a "big impact on their mental, physical and emotional health."

"More than half of students say that homework is their primary source of stress, and we know what stress can do on our bodies," she says, adding that staying up late to finish assignments also leads to disrupted sleep and exhaustion.

Cynthia Catchings, a licensed clinical social worker and therapist at Talkspace, says heavy workloads can also cause serious mental health problems in the long run, like anxiety and depression.

And for all the distress homework causes, it's not as useful as many may think, says Dr. Nicholas Kardaras, a psychologist and CEO of Omega Recovery treatment center.

"The research shows that there's really limited benefit of homework for elementary age students, that really the school work should be contained in the classroom," he says.

For older students, Kang says homework benefits plateau at about two hours per night.

"Most students, especially at these high-achieving schools, they're doing a minimum of three hours, and it's taking away time from their friends from their families, their extracurricular activities. And these are all very important things for a person's mental and emotional health."

Catchings, who also taught third to 12th graders for 12 years, says she's seen the positive effects of a no homework policy while working with students abroad.

"Not having homework was something that I always admired from the French students (and) the French schools, because that was helping the students to really have the time off and really disconnect from school ," she says.

The answer may not be to eliminate homework completely, but to be more mindful of the type of work students go home with, suggests Kang, who was a high-school teacher for 10 years.

"I don't think (we) should scrap homework, I think we should scrap meaningless, purposeless busy work-type homework. That's something that needs to be scrapped entirely," she says, encouraging teachers to be thoughtful and consider the amount of time it would take for students to complete assignments.

The pandemic made the conversation around homework more crucial

Mindfulness surrounding homework is especially important in the context of the last two years. Many students will be struggling with mental health issues that were brought on or worsened by the pandemic, making heavy workloads even harder to balance.

"COVID was just a disaster in terms of the lack of structure. Everything just deteriorated," Kardaras says, pointing to an increase in cognitive issues and decrease in attention spans among students. "School acts as an anchor for a lot of children, as a stabilizing force, and that disappeared."

But even if students transition back to the structure of in-person classes, Kardaras suspects students may still struggle after two school years of shifted schedules and disrupted sleeping habits.

"We've seen adults struggling to go back to in-person work environments from remote work environments. That effect is amplified with children because children have less resources to be able to cope with those transitions than adults do," he explains.

'Get organized' ahead of back-to-school

In order to make the transition back to in-person school easier, Kang encourages students to "get good sleep, exercise regularly (and) eat a healthy diet."

To help manage workloads, she suggests students "get organized."

"There's so much mental clutter up there when you're disorganized... sitting down and planning out their study schedules can really help manage their time," she says.

Breaking assignments up can also make things easier to tackle.

"I know that heavy workloads can be stressful, but if you sit down and you break down that studying into smaller chunks, they're much more manageable."

If workloads are still too much, Kang encourages students to advocate for themselves.

"They should tell their teachers when a homework assignment just took too much time or if it was too difficult for them to do on their own," she says. "It's good to speak up and ask those questions. Respectfully, of course, because these are your teachers. But still, I think sometimes teachers themselves need this feedback from their students."

©2021 USA Today Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Eric R. Maisel Ph.D.

6 Tips for Getting Work Done While Feeling Sad and Hopeless

If sadness is the new normal, how are we going to cope.

Posted August 9, 2021 | Reviewed by Tyler Woods

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Eric Maisel

We have many reasons for feeling sad nowadays. We seem to have a cultural imperative not to feel sad and then a related cultural imperative to call the sadness we experience “ depression .” But if we can step outside those cultural imperatives, we come face-to-face with a simple, difficult truth: most people are feeling very sad nowadays.

A significant reason for this deep sadness is that we have lost hope. We have many reasons for having lost hope. Our feelings of hopelessness are not irrational. They are completely rational and, as pundits like to put it, evidence-based. We have lost hope because it seems as if every single thing about life has darkened. Life now comes with much less daylight.

It is hard to have hope for the planet. It is hard to have hope that the pandemic will ever pass. It is hard to have hope for democracy. It is hard to have hope that the massive inequalities and injustices that currently exist will ever be remediated. It is hard to believe in the species.

As a result, we are sad. But we have to continue on while sad, since we are here. How are we supposed to pull that feat off, carrying on while feeling hopeless and sad? It may seem silly to provide “tips” for a challenge this profound, as if we were talking about installing an app or selling a house. Nevertheless, we must start somewhere. Here are six tips for coping in a difficult time:

1. Things are not as they were. Realize that.

With sadness and hopelessness come mental and physical fatigue. This means that we may be sleeping more, or sleeping more fitfully, or not getting as much done as we are used to getting done, or getting exhausted by simple chores, or getting exhausted just thinking about what needs doing. We should not be surprised that we are doing poorly. Things are not as they were. Realize that.

2. Everything has changed. And nothing has changed.

We were always going to live out our lifespan and then die. We were always just energized matter completely assured of passing back into cosmic dust. So, we always had just two choices: to live according to our self-identified life purposes, on the side of the good and opposed to the bad, or to not live that way. Nothing about that imperative has changed. No matter how the world turns, our marching orders remain exactly the same: to do the next right thing. Those efforts were never going to save the world or spare us from dying. They still won’t. But they provide us with a way of living that makes personal sense of our time on earth.

3. “Realizing” is not the same as giving up or giving in.

We stand in that darkness and say, “Okay, I am feeling sad. I am feeling hopeless. I am feeling anxious . But I have some remaining resources and some remaining freedom. Let me look life in the eye, including the work I currently do, and see where and how I can make an effort. The universe doesn’t care whether or not I make that effort, but I do. And I can make that effort.” There is an attitude to adopt that doesn’t change the facts of existence but that changes your facts of existence. It sounds like, “Even though I am bent over, I can stand up.”

4. Be sad. But don’t beat yourself up.

Being sad is one thing. Charging yourself with being sad, as if you’d committed a crime , is a very different thing. You have committed no crime. You have demonstrated no weakness. You have succumbed to no mental illness. It would be supremely unhelpful to blame yourself for your sadness, as if you had failed at something. You are sad because you have reasons for feeling sad.

5. Rethink work, reimagine work, but also work.

Before all this new sadness and hopelessness, you may already have not been enjoying your work very much. The vast majority of polled Americans do not like their work. Their work was already making them sad. So, too, were their limited options. It wasn’t as if, hating your current work, you could snap your fingers and win some work lottery. Now, on top of those abiding realities, you have a new ration of sadness and hopelessness. Well, your options are limited but clear: do the work that you must do, including all the taxing bits of your current work; and try your darnedest to plot a new course, if a new course feels necessary. This sounds like: “I show up; and I also dream and plan.”

6. Seek out comfort and joy.

Is it a comfort to fantasize ? Then fantasize. Is it a joy to listen to the old songs? Then listen to the old songs. Do you crave that delicious treat down the block but feel too sad and exhausted to buckle your shoes? Buckle one shoe, then buckle the other. Do you love blue, as I do? Go find a sky blue or an ocean blue and feel less blue. Watch that movie you love, even if you’ve seen it fifty times already. If small comforts were flat-out meaningless, they wouldn’t comfort us. But they do. They answer no questions and solve no riddles. But they can make us smile.

homework makes me depressed

Sadness is with us. We can misuse language and call it a “depression epidemic” and act as if rats were among us spreading a plague. No; we are simply drowning in reasons to feel sad. So, we may need to show up sad, to our work and everywhere else as well. But show up we must.

Eric R. Maisel Ph.D.

Eric Maisel, Ph.D. , is the author of more than 50 books, among them Redesign Your Mind.

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Can’t do homework because depressed? (9 ways to cope)

homework makes me depressed

As a BetterHelp affiliate, we may receive compensation from BetterHelp if you purchase products or services through the links provided.

The Optimistminds editorial team is made up of psychologists, psychiatrists and mental health professionals. Each article is written by a team member with exposure to and experience in the subject matter.  The article then gets reviewed by a more senior editorial member. This is someone with extensive knowledge of the subject matter and highly cited published material.

The article below is focused on what to do if you can’t do homework because you are depressed. 

Depression and anhedonia 

Anhedonia is a condition where an individual suffers from the lack of motivation and pleasure to engage himself or herself in any activity.

One of the major symptoms of depression is anhedonia. Other symptoms along with anhedonia are feelings of sadness, worthlessness, hopelessness and excessive or too less appetite.

To not be able to do homework because of depression is nothing to be shocked about. It is normal for anyone regardless of the presence of any mental illness to not feel like doing homework and assignment. But if you feel you cannot concentrate on anything that you are planning to do and end up feeling depressed then these ways may help you to cope up.

  • Engage in physical activity 

In an article published in the journal ” Psychology”, it has been mentioned that sustained physical activity can help a person with his or her bad mood by balancing out the chemicals in their body, restricting the frequency of crisis and offering means of catharsis.

The benefits of doing some physical activity on a regular basis keeps your body fit, mind energetic, increases blood supply to all the organs and decreases risk of becoming depressed and sad.

Activities that you can do:

Doing exercise at home

You can surf the youtube and grab loads of videos on cardio, warm ups, ab workout and many more. 

I personally like Chloe ting’s workout videos. When I cannot concentrate, I usually start off with any of her challenging videos which eventually makes me feel strong, focused and energetic.

  • Go out for a walk

If you think cardio is not your thing, you can simply grab your earphones and go our for a short walk. When you are walking look around your vicinity, attend to the trees and plants around you. Attend to anything that catches your eyes. You shall feel happier I assure.

  • Take a ride

You can also take a bicycle ride surrounding your locality to get some fresh air and help yourself. 

If you feel you cannot concentrate on your homeworks and assignments, you can get any kind of physical activity included in your schedule. This will help you lighten your mood thus you will be able to concentrate on your studies. 

2. Practice mindfulness

Mindfulness is a mental state in which a person experiences the present moment without getting distracted by the memories of the past or the anticipations of the future.

Mindfulness will help you get back to tracking and get going with your task.

When you feel like you do not want to sit with your homework, follow this easy mindfulness strategy.

Sit back and relax; close your eyes; focus on what is happening around you; become conscious of your breathing; breathe consciously; inhale and exhale bigger; feel all the five senses individually; feel the place where you are sitting; feel the black hollow of your closed eyes; breathe the smell of the air; feel your tongue, listen to all the sounds happening around; don’t think about what you have done or you plan to do. Just feel the moment and you will be able to concentrate on your homework.

3. W‌‌rite journal

Writing a journal when you cannot concentrate on your homework can help you get over anhedonia. 

We all need to socialize at some point to share our feelings and emotions especially when we are not happy or feeling depressed.

It is always not possible to find a person to talk to, who would be understanding. Instead you can find a therapist in your own diary. Write what you have to say to a diary and give yourself advice as if you are your own therapist. This type of cognitive restructuring will help you with feelings of depression and anhedonia. 

  • Start doing a hobby 

If you have a hobby that you like to do, start doing it. You need some motivation and energy to work efficiently. Start a new hobby or get yourself engaged in an old one. If you like baking, go and grab the ingredients from the nearest grocery story and start off, you can even prepare a Depression Cake. If you like watching movies, call upon some friends and watch a good movie that will inspire you. You can also listen to songs, watch games and sketch your heart out. 

You can also start a new hobby or experiment with your old ones. This will help you attain a lot of energy and greater goals in life. 

  • Start with small goals

It is very important to give attention to how you plan your day. You should not make unrealistic plans of completing a ton of tasks in one day. Start with small goals. If you feel your assigned task will take more than a day, plan it likewise. Afterall who likes monotony? Make sure your assignment does not make you bored and uninterested. 

According to studies, socializing is a good way of getting over depression. You can socialize over the internet. Nowadays the internet has connected people from all over the world through social media. You can also register in various depression chat rooms to talk to people and get support from users. You can go out and hang around with your friends. 

You can also call up a friend of yours and talk for some time. This will provide you with instant energy so that you can sit properly with your studies.

  • Take a break 

It is very important to take a break when you feel you cannot do something that you are assigned to do.

At times we are depressed and we do not feel motivated enough to do anything. We are bored at the monotony of our lives. We should take breaks and not force ourselves to do something, which we have no intrinsic motivation towards. 

  • Use depression chat rooms

Depression chat rooms are online platforms where people who are suffering from depression communicate  with each other about their experiences and receive mutual support and help. 

These chat rooms are moderated by a volunteer who makes sure that the rules and ethics of the site is maintained.

Depression chat rooms and forums are quite helpful because people these days find chat rooms easier to use because of their availability and trustworthiness compared to getting an appointment from therapists.

Some common Chat rooms and forums 

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) offers support groups and forums led by peers to help people living with depression and bipolar disorders to share experiences and coping skills thus gaining hope. Depression Chat Rooms

Depression Chat Rooms from depression-chat-rooms.org aims to make people suffering from depression and anxiety communicate with each other. They also welcome people with similar or related health issues such as bipolar disorder and eating disorders. The website is independent, nonprofit, and free.

Depression Forums

Depression Forums offers forums on topics ranging from depression, anxiety to bipolar along with ways to recover, cope and therapy moderated by volunteers. This forum is trusted and has members around 70000.

Depression Sanctuary

Depression Sanctuary is a well-known nonprofit organization created to provide safe, moderated services for people with depression and anxiety. They  seek support from other like-minded people in these chatrooms. Membership is required to participate in the Depression Sanctuary chat rooms, but it’s completely free to join.

The are hosted at specific times. You have to make sure that you abide by the rules and regulations of the chatrooms and treat every member respectfully. The volunteers working over here also suffer from depression. Please be kind to them and treat them with respect.

.Depression Understood

Depression Understood offers a depression chat room that is always open. They aim to have a relaxed, supportive, and informal atmosphere for people who like virtual talk therapy services. 

HealthUnlocked

HealthUnlocked runs in partnership with the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA) and offers a safe space for anxiety and depression support. 

Healthfulcha t is a trustworthy service for people who are succumbed to any sort of mental illness. They say “ Here, you will find a Depression Chat Room , depression forums, and a depression social network. It is the hope of HealthfulChat that these important forms of peer support, along with whatever medical attention you may be receiving will help bring you up out of the cloud of depression so that you can begin to enjoy life again. 

  • Don’t give up

You should keep on trying until and unless you gain your concentration to do your assignments in time. Depression should not overpower your potential. Perseverance is the cornerstone of never giving up. Some might consider it being stubborn. But in reality, it is just a doggedness of pushing forward when times get tough and never giving up until you have achieved your dreams. One of the key facets of never giving up is hard work, patience, commitment and self-love

Conclusion 

From the article we got to know what to do if you can’t do homework because you are depressed. The article also points out the reason behind lack of motivation also known as anhedonia and how it can be overpowering when someone is depressed. It can be concluded that not being able to do homework because of depression is nothing to be shocked about. It is normal for anyone regardless of the presence of any mental illness to not feel like doing homework and assignment. But if you feel you cannot concentrate on anything that you are planning to do and end up feeling depressed then these ways may help you to cope up.

FAQs : Can’t do homework because depressed

Can anhedonia be cured.

At present, there are no treatments aimed at anhedonia.

Is anhedonia a mental illness?

Anhedonia is the inability to feel pleasure. It’s a common symptom of depression as well as other mental health disorders.

What is an example of anhedonia?

To not be able to do homework because of depression is nothing to be shocked about. It is normal for anyone regardless of the presence of any mental illness to not feel like doing homework and assignment. But if you feel you cannot concentrate on anything that you are planning to do and end up feeling depressed then that can be a sign of anhedonia.

Does exercise help anhedonia?

Absolutely yes. The benefits of doing some physical activity on a regular basis keeps your body fit, mind energetic, increases blood supply to all the organs and decreases risk of becoming depressed and sad.

You can surf the youtube and grab loads of videos on cardio, warm ups, ab workout and many more.   I personally like Chloe ting’s workout videos. When I cannot concentrate, I usually start off with any of her challenging videos which eventually makes me feel strong, focused and energetic.

Can yoga help anhedonia?

Yes yoga makes you mindful and can help you fight with anhedonia

Can lifestyle have an effect on depression?

Lifestyle factors can influence depression such as lack of nutrition, lack of physical activity, experience of trauma etc. 

Can’t force myself to do homework?

Tips and Tricks on How to Motivate Yourself to Do Homework Listen to music, but not just any music.  Set goals and establish a reward system.  Take regular breaks.  Keep the consequences in mind.  Get some rest, if needed.

Who invented homework?

Horace Mann

Instead, it is believed that Horace Mann, an American 19th-century politician and educational reformer, invented the modern concept of homework and made it an educational essential in schools.

Why is HomeWork bad?

In 2013, research conducted at Stanford University found that students in high-achieving communities who spend too much time on homework experience more stress, physical health problems.

Is homework a waste of time?

Homework is a waste of time, indeed. 

Why is homework bad for your health?

Homework can cause physical problems as well as mental.

How to deal with homework when depressed?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK201497/

https://www.quora.com/How-can-I-bring-myself-to-do-homework-with-depression

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homework makes me depressed

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Whether you’re struggling with feelings of sadness, hopelessness, or fatigue, BetterHelp can help you develop coping strategies, build resilience, and find joy in life again.

Don’t wait to start feeling better – sign up for BetterHelp today and take the first step towards a brighter tomorrow.

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I Can’t Concentrate

Depression and/or anxiety can severely impact our capacity to focus on the important things in our life, including our course. It is very easy to quickly fall behind with our studies, creating more problems for us to deal with.

One of the many great videos from www.itgetsbrighter.org

Student life tends to be hectic, with lots going on. If you are living in shared accommodation, it can be noisy, and difficult to avoid distraction from others. Likewise, if you are living on your own, feeling isolated or detached from others can also be problematic.

Problems with concentration will affect most students at one time or another, but depressed or anxious thinking habits set up a kind of internal ‘noise’ that can cause these problems to become intense or chronic. Take a look at the pages in the Making Changes and Self-Support section for more information.

Very few students sail through their degrees without a few study problems. Addressing issues sooner rather than later is vital in order to prevent study problems from getting you down. If we are experiencing depression or anxiety, it can feel so much harder, with everyday tasks presenting real challenges. If it feels too much to get out of bed or have a shower, focusing on academic work can sometimes feel impossible.

There are things we can do to help support ourselves at this time.

Problems With The C ourse

One of the commonest problems for students when they first start on a course is realising that it isn’t what they expected, or not suited to them in some way. Also, as people progress through their course, they may find it does not develop in the way they had hoped, or lose interest in their subject as time goes on. Depression and anxiety can also significantly, and falsely, contribute to people not enjoying or engaging with their studies.

Universities and colleges have an interest in students being on the right course for them, and will usually offer support in addressing problems of this nature. It is always important to speak with a Personal Tutor, or another member of staff in your department. We can often feel anxious about doing this, but people will usually find that approaching someone can be an important first step in dealing with problems.

Leaving Things to The Last Minute…

Procrastination is another very common student issue, which can be closely linked with any or all of the other issues discussed on this page. It is also a very common part of the depression habit spiral – the more things get put off, the more overwhelming they seem. Procrastination is particularly linked to the depressed thinking habits of perfectionism, self-bullying and all-or-nothing thinking.

 Diagram showing vicious cycles of depression and anxiety affecting concentration and activity for university students

There are a number of things we can do to support ourselves in getting things done. Have a look at the Making Changes information on this site for some ideas.

Time Management

Having to juggle a number of different demands can be extremely difficult; these might include study, work, family or other commitments, for example. Some university or college courses are quite structured, but many only specify a few lecture or seminar commitments a week, while expecting students to organise much of their own study independently. Making the mistake of seeing non-lecture time as ‘free’ time can leave students feeling lost and aimless, making space for depression to flourish. Alternatively, rushing around from one thing to the next without proper rest can suddenly lead to a depressed ‘burnout’.

There are a number of things we can do to support ourselves in managing the demands and expectations we encounter. Have a look at the Making Changes information on this site for some ideas.

Performance and Exam Anxiety

A little adrenaline helps performance, but over-worrying is a very good way to reduce efficiency and effectiveness, as well as exhausting ourselves. Depressed thinking habits and raised stress levels can get in the way of you doing your best in your studies. Getting your time management and concentration sorted is a good starting point. Use the study skills support and resources offered by your academic or student services department.

Planning and Practical Action

The most important first step for managing depression and anxiety is to focus on what you can practically do to support yourself. Basic planning and time management can help us feel more in control of things. There is a wealth of detailed advice provided by universities, colleges, and student organisations, for planning your student life effectively. Try these tips as a starting point:

  • Get a good quality planner or diary with enough space to record all your commitments, or download from an app store a good quality ‘To-Do’ app and planner to use on your phone. These will often sync across to tablet and desktop computers too, meaning you have up-to-date information available across a number of sites.
  • Use the planner to record all of your study commitments and deadlines, as well as other appointments or social events.
  • Take some time to plan out your week effectively, so that you assign realistic and achievable blocks of time to study, leisure, work, and exercise. This is especially important if your course involves a lot of independent study and fewer organised contact hours. Remember that studying is not the only thing you need to be making time for!
  • Plan your time for assignments, so you are realistic about what might be involved. Again, talking to a tutor about this might help. Starting is the hardest part, so plan to just make a very small step as your starting point (getting a book out of the library, for example).
  • Or if the writing part is what you find hard to start, then jot down some random thoughts and sentences straight away without thinking too hard about it – once you have something down on the page, it is easier to shape a plan for going forward from there.
  • Most universities will offer study skills courses or web resources. It is also worth talking to someone in your department, as departmental-specific resources may be available. These can be helpful, particularly when depression and/or anxiety are sapping your resources. Sometimes putting basic strategies in place can help considerably.

Tell Your Course Tutor About Your Difficulties

It is very important to tell your tutors about any struggles you are facing with your mental health, including depression and anxiety. Universities and colleges have a responsibility under law to ensure that students are appropriately supported and that, wherever possible, ‘reasonable adjustments’ can be made. Different institutions will do things slightly differently, but talk to your tutor and go to the Student Services centre (or equivalent in your institution) and explain the difficulties you are experiencing. They will treat your information confidentially and will talk to you about how you might be supported on your course. Support can include study skills, additional time in examinations or other deadlines, or more face-to-face support, for example.

What you will be offered will depend on your circumstances and what the institution has available. However, the important message here is to tell someone about what is happening.

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18 Hidden Ways Depression Affects You at School

homework makes me depressed

With all the pressure of getting good grades, participating in extracurriculars and having a social life, school can be a stressful time for anyone. But for students with depression –who may have trouble finding the motivation to get out of bed, let alone finish their assignments — it can be especially difficult, and sometimes teachers and family don’t understand.

But it’s not always obvious when a student has depression — so  we asked people in our mental health community to share hidden ways depression affects their experience at school.

Here’s what they had to say:

1. “Far too often, I end up procrastinating because either I’m too emotionally exhausted to do my work, or I want to distract myself from the depressive thoughts. So I spend time watching TV or browsing through the internet. In classes, I’ll try to focus but end up zoning out or just ignoring what’s happening around me. Somehow, I still manage to get decent grades, but it baffles me.” — Alaura F.

2. “When you have one of your ‘episodes’ so to speak, you just sit in class and can’t take anything in or concentrate. Then you don’t learn, and when it happens often you find yourself having no idea what’s been going on for months.” — Eliyah R.

3. “I used to stay in the library doing assignments for as many hours as possible to avoid people and focus on something other than how bad I felt. Before I used to be passionate about what I wrote, but during that period there was zero passion in my writing, it was purely mundane. Plus, I knew if I didn’t fight procrastination and get assignments done then I would also have my anxiety to contend with when they were due.” — Kashmere N

4. “I think the hardest part for me is knowing I need to study or do homework but completely lacking the motivation to do so. And knowing how important keeping my daily routine is but so quickly falling behind.” — Jamie W.

5. “A lot of the time you get labeled the ‘lazy teenager’ or other such cliches. Yes, it may have taken me five hours to get out of bed, and yes, my assignments weren’t met. But there are hidden reasons. Often I am late for classes not because I cannot be bothered but because it is completely impossible to get out of the house in less than five hours some days. The lack of motivation is hard to deal with.” — Lucy M.

6. “Sometimes I didn’t do my homework because: ‘I’m a failure so why do I even try?’”— Noella K.

7. “Fear of failure definitely. Self-doubt. It just gets to a point when I give up and miss out on some opportunities my ‘normal’ brain would jump sky high for. I get this clouded vision that I’m not capable or worthy of anything and that there’s no point in trying, I’m useless anyway. It affects my grades and my social life. I lose friends and respect from my teachers, and it hurts worse in the long run. Now that I’m slowly recovering, every day I’m realizing how much self-doubt gets in the way of the person I want to be and my future.” — Hannah F.

8. “Oftentimes, I go to college on very little sleep. Some days it will be none, and other days it will be two to four hours. That’s just the norm to me. In episodes, I am in a constant fog and my body feels super heavy. I feel even worse and can’t concentrate on top of my other depressive and borderline personality syndrome (BPD) symptoms.” — Kellyann N.

9. “When I was a student, my depression would get the best of me, I wouldn’t study or write my papers. Not because I didn’t want to — oh, I thought and worried about it constantly. I couldn’t do it because my depression keep telling me what I wrote was garbage, what I studied didn’t matter, and it all piles up. I would get so overwhelmed I would blank out in class, staring off and couldn’t focus. Then class would be over and I would be so upset with myself because I didn’t pay attention. That only fed the depression, telling me I would never make it so why should I bother.  I was trapped in my own mind.” — Carolyn A.

10. “I distracted myself by obsessing with my notes. Color-coordinated, perfect writing, prefect lines, thorough essays. I had all straight As. No one knew I had a war in my head because I was the perfect student. But when my work was done… my thoughts would flood back to me and I’d become overwhelmed. Repeat the process until I would go home and cry for an hour.” — Jessica S.

11. “Not being able to attend classes and having to make up reasons for why you’re not there. To both your teachers and your family. And when living in dorms, the humiliation of bringing your trash or dishes out from your bedroom when you haven’t had the energy or motivation to clean your room for like a week. People just think you’re gross or lazy. But I genuinely couldn’t face going into the kitchen if anyone was there. Also, weight gain. I’m a comfort eater and rarely had the energy to cook, so I would mostly get take out or order something in. I tried to convince myself that my flatmates didn’t notice or care, till one day I came through to cook, and some of my flatmates were in the kitchen. And I know they were trying to be friendly and supportive, but they made a fuss over the fact I was actually in the kitchen cooking. And all I wanted to do was flee back to my bedroom and not show my face now that I knew they were observing my eating habits. I was humiliated.” — Rebecca B.

12. “When you want to sit by yourself in class, but teachers keep coming up asking, ‘Are you OK?’ ‘Do you want someone to come sit here?’  They mean well, but it serves as a constant reminder that today I’m not strong enough to interact with my peers.” — Katriana F.

13. “It’s a snowball effect. Depression affects my ability to get things done efficiently, so then I have two options: 1) I stay up late and avoid social events so no one knows I’m struggling or 2) I avoid the issue with all sorts of procrastination until I force myself to do just the bare minimum. Either way I feel guilt and shame about it and stay stuck in the downward spiral.” — Emily C.

14 . “When an episode hits, it really does feel like my mind is broken. I try to study but can’t, and it soon turns into this spiral of very harsh self-criticism and zoning out while my brain tries so desperately to recover. When this happens, I try to use music to relate to. Music really helps me sort my thoughts out, but unfortunately, a day of studying was just ruined because of my inability to pay attention.” — Morgan M.

15. “At university I used to spend pretty much every free day I had in the library working – I knew if I didn’t, I wouldn’t be able to get out of bed or do anything productive. I didn’t always get much done, but the fact that I had got out of bed and done something made the negative thoughts a little less intrusive and kept them at bay to a certain extent” — Rebecca D.

16. “ As much as you want to succeed, you feel like you’re dragging around too much to be able to function. You let school work fall behind. You care deep down, but depression pulls you in deeper. You watch the teacher speak, but nothing is comprehended.” — Meaghan T.

17. “It’s having no motivation to do work while at school but then getting home and feeling so exhausted it seems impossible to attempt any of the work I didn’t do. It’s sitting silently and being constantly scrutinized for it — ‘Are you OK?’ ‘You seem quiet.’ ‘Someone’s in a mood.’ ‘Stop PMS-ing/sulking.’ Not once was I ever asked, ‘Is your mental health affecting your studies?’ That would have made an enormous difference.” — Rosie B.

18. “A positive note: School is what pulls me through. If I didn’t have my study I don’t know how I would’ve handled life. School is something I have to do, it’s my number one priority. Yes, it’s sometimes very difficult because of the episodes which I had randomly in class, but my best friend (who is in the same class) knows about my depression so knows how to handle it. I had days where I just couldn’t get out of bed because of it, but then I think about how important school is for me and I always end up happy for going to school. It’s a distraction and a motivation to keep on going for me. ” — Noella K.

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Why am I depressed?

What to do if you feel depressed tip 1: talk to someone, tip 2: get moving, tip 3: reframe negative thoughts, tip 4: find hope and contentment within, tip 5: add mindfulness to your day, tip 6: express gratitude, tip 7: savor simple sources of joy, tip 8: get a daily dose of sunlight, tip 9: don’t ignore thoughts of suicide, i feel depressed: 9 ways to deal with depression.

Feeling persistently sad, numb, worthless, fatigued, or trapped in negativity? Depression affects people in many different ways, but this toolkit offers simple tips to improve how you feel right now.

homework makes me depressed

Feelings of sadness can quickly come and go, but when you’re depressed, these negative feelings stubbornly persist. Depression symptoms such as hopelessness, fatigue, lack of appetite, and decreased interest in school, work, or hobbies can arise for a variety of reasons. Your genetic makeup can make you more susceptible to depression, but stressful life events such as divorce, job loss, or past trauma often play a role. Substance abuse and loneliness can also contribute to feelings of depression.

If you’re feeling depressed, know that you’re far from alone. Research indicates that about 280 million people in the world suffer with depression. It can impact your work life, social life, and even your physical health. In severe cases, professional treatment may be necessary for recovery. But there are also a number of steps you can try for yourself to help boost your mood and improve how you feel.

The simple act of talking to someone who cares about you is crucial to  dealing with feelings of depression . Know that reaching out is not a sign of weakness and won’t make you a burden. The person you talk to doesn’t have to be able to fix you; they just need to listen without being distracted or judging you.

Turn to people you trust. Talk to a close friend or family member about what you’re going through. Face-to-face interactions are best for boosting your mood, so schedule an in-person chat if possible.

Rely on technology when needed. When you feel sapped of energy, you might have a harder time being motivated to hang out with friends and family in-person. However, you may find it easier to stay in touch via video, phone, or text.

Prioritize giving and receiving support. Attending a support group for people with depression can offer an opportunity to draw comfort from others who are experiencing similar issues—and offer your own support in return. You’ll get to trade stories and receive coping advice from other people in the group who understand what you’re going through at the moment. If you feel uncomfortable with in-person support groups, some online therapy platforms offer virtual support groups.

Speak to a Licensed Therapist

BetterHelp is an online therapy service that matches you to licensed, accredited therapists who can help with depression, anxiety, relationships, and more. Take the assessment and get matched with a therapist in as little as 48 hours.

It’s probably the last thing you feel like doing right now—but getting active, even for a short period, is one of the most effective ways of boosting your mood. In fact, regular exercise can be just as effective as antidepressant medication in easing depression. And you don’t need to join an expensive gym or health club to reap the benefits.

  • Take a short, 15-minute walk to boost your mood for several hours.
  • Cycle, jog, or walk through a park or other green space.
  • Dance to your favorite music.
  • Play with your dog or kids.
  • Try in-person or online exercise classes for aerobics, interval training, or Pilates.
  • Create a simple home gym using resistance bands, water bottles, or your own body weight.
  • Stretch or practice simple yoga poses.

[ Read: The Mental Health Benefits of Exercise ]

While external factors such as isolation, financial worries, or fears about your health can contribute to depression, so too can the way you think. But there are ways of looking at your situation in a more realistic, hopeful way.

  • Note when you have a negative thought  such as “I’ll never be able to pay the mortgage and I’ll lose my home,” or “Everyone thinks I’m a loser.”
  • Challenge the thought  by asking yourself “Do I know that for sure?” or “What would I say to a close friend who had the same thought?”
  • Change the thought  to a more helpful way of thinking. “I can renegotiate mortgage payments with the bank” or “I’ve made it through bad times before. I can do it again.”

It’s natural to blame life circumstances for how you feel—especially in these difficult times. But there are ways to find contentment within, regardless of your situation.

Be your own friend. Instead of rehashing past mistakes, focusing on the negative aspects of your life, or dwelling on worst-case scenarios, talk to yourself in a kinder, more realistic way—the same way you’d expect a caring friend to talk to you.

Pat yourself on the back. Take a moment to acknowledge your role in the successes you’ve experienced in life and give yourself credit.

Change your morning thoughts. Before you go to sleep, write down something positive you can read as soon as you wake up in the morning—a hope you have for the day or something you’re grateful for.

Mindfulness is the practice of focusing your attention on the present moment and accepting it without judgment. It can prevent you from getting caught up in worries about the future or regrets about the past.

Listen to a favorite song.  Sit somewhere comfortable and give your attention fully to the music, even if it’s a song you’ve heard a thousand times before. Allow yourself to be present in the moment.

Try a mindful chore.  Complete a household chore such as washing dishes while giving your attention fully to the task. Notice how things feel, smell, or sound and whenever your mind wanders, gently bring it back to the task.

Meditate.  HelpGuide’s  Mindful Breathing Meditation  can help you harness the power of your breath to ground yourself in the present moment and find inner calm.

When you’re depressed, everything in life can seem bleak and hopeless. But even on the darkest days, it’s usually possible to find one thing you can be grateful about—the beauty of a sunset, the feeling of the wind on your face, or a phone call from a friend, for example. Acknowledging gratitude for even the smallest things in life can give you a break from negative thinking and instill hope back into your day.

  • Take a deep breath and think of one thing you’re grateful for: your children, your home, your pet, or even a smile from a stranger, for example.
  • Before you switch off the light at night, take a moment to write down something that made you grateful today. Focus your mind on it as you fall asleep.
  • Try HelpGuide’s  Gratitude in Difficult Times  meditation to help you find a more grateful mindset, even when you’re feeling down or despairing.

[ Read: Gratitude: The Benefits and How to Practice It ]

You can’t just will yourself out of depression or force yourself to feel happier, but there are things you can do throughout the day to  find joy , boost your mood, and ease stress.

  • Listen to uplifting music, watch funny videos online, or download episodes of your favorite sitcom.
  • Try to spend some time in nature—go for a walk in the park or find a new hiking trail.
  • Help a friend or neighbor with an errand. Helping others can be just as beneficial to you as it is for them.
  • Take a class either online or in-person, listen to a lecture, or take a tour of a museum.
  • Take up a new hobby, learn to play an instrument, or write your memoirs—anything that brings you a sense of joy and fulfillment.

When you’re feeling low, you might be tempted to close the blinds and self-isolate indoors. However, sunlight helps to boost serotonin levels and improve your outlook. Therefore, it’s important to try to expose yourself to sunlight for at least 15 minutes a day. This is especially important during winter, when the  reduced daylight hours  can take a serious toll on your mood.

  • Take a walk at lunchtime, drink your morning coffee outside, or spend time outdoors exercising or doing yardwork.
  • Increase the amount of natural light in your home by opening blinds and drapes and sitting near windows.
  • Paint your walls in lighter colors or use daylight simulation bulbs.
  • If you live somewhere with little winter sunshine, try using a light therapy box.

Depression is a major risk factor for suicide. If the deep despair and hopelessness that accompanies depression makes suicide feel like the only way to escape the pain, please reach out for help.

While your problems may seem overwhelming and permanent now, with time you will feel better, especially if you get help. There are many people who want to support you during this difficult time, so please reach out!

Read  Are You Feeling Suicidal? , call the  National Suicide Prevention Lifeline  in the U.S. at 1-800-273-8255, find a helpline in your country at  Befrienders Worldwide , or use HelpGuide’s Directory of International Mental Health Helplines .

More Information

  • Treatment Options - Explore the different treatments available for depression. (Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance)
  • Depression: Back from the Bluez - Self-help modules for coping with and recovering from depression. (Center for Clinical Interventions)
  • What Causes Depression? - Including genes, temperament, stressful life events, and medical issues. (Harvard Health Publishing)
  • Depression. (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2022, from Link
  • Lambert, G., Reid, C., Kaye, D., Jennings, G., & Esler, M. (2002). Effect of sunlight and season on serotonin turnover in the brain. The Lancet , 360(9348), 1840–1842. Link
  • Netz, Y. (2017). Is the Comparison between Exercise and Pharmacologic Treatment of Depression in the Clinical Practice Guideline of the American College of Physicians Evidence-Based? Frontiers in Pharmacology , 8, 257. Link
  • The classification of depression and depression rating scales/questionnaires—Depression in Adults with a Chronic Physical Health Problem—NCBI Bookshelf . (n.d.). Retrieved November 15, 2022, from Link
  • Depressive Disorders. (2013). In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders . American Psychiatric Association. Link
  • Gillihan, Seth. The CBT Deck: 101 Practices to Improve Thoughts, Be in the Moment & Take Action in Your Life . PESI Publishing, 2019. Link

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IMAGES

  1. Little Schoolgirl Sad and Tired Looking Depressed Suffering Stress

    homework makes me depressed

  2. How to Slay School When You Are Depressed

    homework makes me depressed

  3. Little Schoolgirl Sad and Tired Looking Depressed Suffering Stress

    homework makes me depressed

  4. Too Depressed to Do Homework? Get Motivated & Overcome Depression

    homework makes me depressed

  5. Little Schoolgirl Sad and Tired Looking Depressed Suffering Stress

    homework makes me depressed

  6. Little Schoolgirl Sad and Tired Looking Depressed Suffering Stress

    homework makes me depressed

VIDEO

  1. JJK makes me DEPRESSED #anime #reaction #shorts

  2. The Very Terrible State of Dark and Darker

  3. It fr makes me depressed 😔 #fortnite

  4. Streaming until I hit 1k subs!

  5. How to deal with loneliness in high school

  6. Mk1 makes me depressed

COMMENTS

  1. Is it time to get rid of homework? Mental health experts weigh in

    For older students, Kang says, homework benefits plateau at about two hours per night. "Most students, especially at these high achieving schools, they're doing a minimum of three hours, and it's ...

  2. Can Excessive Homework Cause Depression?

    1) Multiple Hours of Homework. Starting in high school, or sometimes even middle school, students begin to slowly receive more and more hours of homework. There are various reasons why multiple hours of homework per week might lead students to depression, with stress and procrastination being at the top. Certain subjects, such as mathematics or ...

  3. Is it time to get rid of homework? Mental health experts weigh in

    Cynthia Catchings, a licensed clinical social worker and therapist at Talkspace, says heavy workloads can also cause serious mental health problems in the long run, like anxiety and depression.

  4. Doing homework feels so depressing : r/mentalillness

    Doing homework feels so depressing. Not sure why, but whenever I'm about to do homework I get so depressed. Its easy homework too, stuff I know I can do and could probably finish really fast, within 10-30 minutes. However I just get so depressed and anxious thinking about doing it.

  5. Depression in Students: Symptoms, Causes, What to Do

    You may be experiencing depression if you've had some of the below symptoms most of the time for the last 2 weeks: ongoing feelings of sadness. being on-edge or snapping at people. low self ...

  6. Homework Struggles May Not Be a Behavior Problem

    ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, social anxiety, generalized anxiety, panic disorder, depression, dysregulation, and a range of other neurodevelopmental and mental health challenges cause numerous ...

  7. Is School Making You Feel Depressed?

    Overview. School is a huge part of your life. It shapes you in ways far beyond academics — and it isn't always easy. If you've ever thought: "school makes me depressed," the most important thing for you to know is that you're not alone. The National Institute of Mental Health reported more than 5 million teenagers had one or more major depressive episodes within the last year ...

  8. School Makes Me Depressed: 5 Steps To Fight Student Depression

    As a result, one may experience anxiety, despair, and low self-esteem. Lack of sleep: It's possible that students aren't getting enough sleep, which can make them tired, irritable, and depressed. Lack of Control: When attending school, some students may feel as though they have no control over their lives.

  9. 6 Tips for Getting Work Done While Feeling Sad and Hopeless

    Find a therapist to overcome depression. 5. Rethink work, reimagine work, but also work. Before all this new sadness and hopelessness, you may already have not been enjoying your work very much ...

  10. Too Depressed to Do Homework? Get Motivated & Overcome Depression

    Learn to feel free. 4. Practice Mindfulness. When you're feeling down and can't seem to focus on your work, mindfulness can be a powerful tool to help you cope. By being present in the moment, without getting lost in thoughts about the past or future, you can block out distractions and get into a productive flow.

  11. Can't do homework because depressed? (9 ways to cope)

    Just feel the moment and you will be able to concentrate on your homework. 3. W‌‌rite journal. Writing a journal when you cannot concentrate on your homework can help you get over anhedonia. We all need to socialize at some point to share our feelings and emotions especially when we are not happy or feeling depressed.

  12. Homework anxiety: Why it happens and how to help

    Use a calm voice. When kids feel anxious about homework, they might get angry, yell, or cry. Avoid matching their tone of voice. Take a deep breath and keep your voice steady and calm. Let them know you're there for them. Sometimes kids just don't want to do homework. They complain, procrastinate, or rush through the work so they can do ...

  13. I Can't Concentrate

    Problems with concentration will affect most students at one time or another, but depressed or anxious thinking habits set up a kind of internal 'noise' that can cause these problems to become intense or chronic. Take a look at the pages in the Making Changes and Self-Support section for more information.

  14. 18 Hidden Ways Depression Affects You at School

    But it's not always obvious when a student has depression — so we asked people in our mental health community to share hidden ways depression affects their experience at school. Here's what they had to say: 1. "Far too often, I end up procrastinating because either I'm too emotionally exhausted to do my work, or I want to distract ...

  15. I Feel Depressed: 9 Ways to Deal with Depression

    Allow yourself to be present in the moment. Try a mindful chore. Complete a household chore such as washing dishes while giving your attention fully to the task. Notice how things feel, smell, or sound and whenever your mind wanders, gently bring it back to the task. Meditate.

  16. Can working from home lead to depression?

    Among females, factors that appear to increase depression include family responsibilities and conflicting work-life balance. Among people aged 16-39 years, these factors include loneliness, work ...

  17. Tips on How to Work from Home with Depression

    joining an exercise or art class. keeping one weekday evening per week open for socializing. trying to see at least one loved one each weekend. running errands with loved ones. joining a support ...

  18. Working from Home Depression: How to Deal

    Create a home "office" space. Working from bed might sound tempting at 8 a.m., but by 2 p.m. you'll be feeling pretty meh. "If possible, avoid working where you sleep," Grilli says ...

  19. Depression Worksheets

    Cognitive Distortions. worksheet. Cognitive distortions are irrational thoughts that influence how you see the world, how you feel, and how you act. It's normal to have cognitive distortions occasionally, but they can be harmful when frequent or extreme. The Cognitive Distortions worksheet identifies and explains some of the most common ...

  20. Working makes me depressed. : r/depression

    I ask bc in my past, I was very depressed with my job (like you) but I had the energy (or drive) to search for new work. Depression, as you know, drains energy and human potential. Be well. 1. [deleted] • 2 yr. ago. School makes me suicidal. 1. AlterCherry.

  21. When Depression Meds Don't Work, This May Help You Turn the Corner

    Transcranial magnetic simulation is a noninvasive therapy for patients with depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder. By Suzanne Leigh Image courtesy of the UCSF TMS and Neuromodulation Program. Some 30% to 40% of patients do not respond to medications for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but half of them could be helped ...