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How can I change the hard disk name in Ubuntu?

I have a computer with Ubuntu installed. By default the hard disk name consists of a sequence of numbers and letters, which is not easy to remember nor input into a terminal.

How can I change the hard disk name in Ubuntu? Which file do I need to change?

Oliver Salzburg's user avatar

  • Do you mean the path to the device (/dev/sdb1), UUID (550e8400-e29b-11d4...) or the label/name of a partition? –  Bobby Apr 8, 2010 at 9:11
  • path to device as i understood is correct, nothing special. UUID has different mask, not the name. I mean label/name under "/media" folder. do you understand? –  Vytas P. Apr 8, 2010 at 9:20
  • sorry, i just install gparted and i was wrong, i need to change UUID, because UUID and label/name under /media is same. –  Vytas P. Apr 8, 2010 at 9:28

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how to change drive letter in linux

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How to simply change the name of your hard drive in Linux

how to change drive letter in linux

In one of the Linux and Open Source Software oriented forums that I am connected to and follow on a daily basis, I saw a question with respect to a topic that had always been passing me by so far. This person asked the forum members if someone knew how to change the name of a hard drive (via the GUI) in Linux in a simple way. This person had already researched and tried everything himself, but according to him it seemed that something simple as adjusting the name was only possible by re-formatting the to be renamed partition, with of course the result of data loss and thus the need to first backup the data on it. This is not what he wanted. So how can we simply change the name of a partition on your hard drive in Linux so it shows correctly in your file manager?

Strange question?

If you come from a Windows or macOS environment then this seems a strange question, because in there you just click with the right mouse button on the partition or drive and you can adjust the label directly via properties. So I had never considered that under Linux this should be done in a different way.

Because I could not imagine that it was really necessary to have to format the entire partition when renaming a disk partition, I decided to dig a bit deeper in the hope of helping the man on this forum with a somewhat more friendly solution. And there is a more simple solution indeed, but through an unclear road, because of a somewhat crooked naming convention in the Disks utility in Linux distributions. Due to the chosen naming system (“Edit filesystem …”) users may deliberately not look further to rename a drive or partition. But it is actually there.

The solution

It is really simple. In your Linux distribution (in my case at the moment of writing Zorin OS 15, but it works for every distribution as long as you have the Disks application) follow the next simple steps to rename a partition without the hassle of reformatting:

1) Go to your applications. 2) Search for Disks.

how to change drive letter in linux

3) Click on Disks to start the application. 4) Select the hard disk on the left 5) Then select the partition to be renamed to the right under Volumes 6) Click on the little block / stop icon to unmount the partition (Unmount selected partition) 7) Click on the gear icon 8) Select the option “Edit filesystem …”

how to change drive letter in linux

You will now see the partition with the newly created name in your file manager or directly on your desktop. It is that simple!

The question still is why did the developers not name the discussed option somthing like “Change Label” instead of “Edit Filesystem”, as the underlying screen is labeled accordingly. In my opinion a bit strange to label an option with “Edit Filesystem” if you can only rename a label. So it is logical that especially Linux beginners are confused where to rename a partition.

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RenameUSBDrive

IconsPage/tip.png

Using the Partition Editor

Using the command line, identify your partition.

IconsPage/terminal.png

Install the Labeling Program

  • sudo apt-get install mtools sudo apt-get install ntfsprogs sudo apt-get install e2fsprogs sudo apt-get install jfsutils sudo apt-get install reiserfsprogs sudo apt-get install xfsprogs

Unmount the Partition

  • sudo umount /dev/sdb1

Changing the Label

Filesystems, fat16 and fat32, check the current label.

  • sudo mlabel -i /dev/sdb1 -s ::

Change the label

  • sudo mlabel -i /dev/sdb1 ::my_external
  • drive p: file="/dev/sdb1" drive q: file="/dev/sdb2"
  • sudo mlabel p:30GB_FAT32

Error message

  • sudo ntfslabel /dev/sdb1
  • sudo ntfslabel /dev/sdb1 my_external

ext2, ext3, and ext4

  • sudo e2label /dev/sdb1
  • sudo e2label /dev/sdb1 my_external
  • sudo jfs_tune /dev/sdb1
  • sudo jfs_tune -L my_external /dev/sdb1

ReiserFS (v3)

  • sudo reiserfstune -l my_external /dev/sdb1
  • xfs_admin -l /dev/sdb1
  • xfs_admin -l my_external /dev/sdb1

Verify the Change

Other resources.

IconsPage/resources.png

RenameUSBDrive (last edited 2013-12-14 11:20:15 by knome )

The material on this wiki is available under a free license, see Copyright / License for details You can contribute to this wiki, see Wiki Guide for details

Learn Ubuntu

Mount Drives in Ubuntu Command Line

Mount Drives in Ubuntu Command Line

Pranav Krishna

Table of Contents

Mounting drives with a graphical user interface is easy. But it becomes a hassle when you don't have access to one.

Well, mounting via the command line is not as easy as doing it in GUI, but it is not super complicated either.

Let me show how to mount drives in Ubuntu command line.

Please enable JavaScript

An introduction to mounting

Mounting is the process in which a drive is made accessible to your Operating System to perform read/write operations. This is common to all OSes.

For example, Windows assigns a drive letter (C, D, E, etc) whilst Linux distributions assign a default path in the /media/<username> or /run/media/<username> folder.

To mount your drive, you should be aware of two things:

  • What device you're mounting (/dev/sda2, /dev/vdb1, etc)
  • Where you're mounting it (A mounting point)

Of course, there are other ways too, but let's stick to the simple and obvious one, the mount command.

The mount command

The mount command is a very popular one, which lets you mount a drive into a folder of your choice. It supports a wide range of partition types.

The general format of the mount command is

In this command, the following are the ones to note.

  • <DEVICE> - The address of the drive you're mounting (/dev/sda2 or any hardware address)
  • /PATH/TO/FOLDER - The absolute path of the folder where you're mounting the drive into
  • -t <TYPE> - (Optional) Lets you specify the type of partition which is being mounted

Now, let's look at how you can mount the drive.

Step1: Check Partitions in your system

It is essential to know the drive name which you want to mount and for that purpose, you can list available drives using the following command:

output of lsblk in the terminal

From here, check what the drive address your device is pointing to. Here, let us mount a removable USB drive.

Step 2: Creating a mounting point

To mount a drive, first, you have to have a place where you can mount it. But to create a mounting point, you don't need anything else but a mkdir command (yes, the mounting point is nothing but a directory):

For example, here, I created a mounting point inside the media directory named Sandisk :

Step 3: Mount the drive

Once you are done creating the mounting point, you can use the mount command in the following manner to mount the drive:

For example, if I want to mount the drive /dev/sdc1 having ext4 FS on a previously created mounting point, I will be using the following:

mounting the drive /dev/sdc using mount command

Our mount-point is also shown in the output of lsblk as follows:

Mount point being displayed in the output of lsblk

Mount drive permanently in Ubuntu

As I mentioned earlier, using the mount command, you can only mount the drive on a temporary basis.

And to make changes permanent, you have to make some changes in the /etc/fstab file.

First, open the /etc/fstab file using the following command:

Go to the end of the file in the nano text editor using Alt + / and add one line in the following syntax:

So if I want to mount  /dev/sdc1 having ext4 Filesystem, I will be using the following:

Once done, save changes and exit from the nano text editor.

Unmount drives in Ubuntu

To unmount, you can type either the mount point (folder) or the device address with the umount command.

Both of them should do it.

But if any process is occurring while you're trying to unmount the drive, and you do not want that to fail, use the lazy option to unmount automatically when the process ends.

And if you mounted the drive permanently, open the /etc/fstab file and remove the line and then restart the device.

Getting error 'Umount Target is Busy'?

While unmounting, you may get an error saying "Umount Target is Busy" which is the result of the target being busy and you're trying to unmount it.

And here's the detailed guide on how to fix that issue:

how to change drive letter in linux

Here's another article that deals with network shares in Ubuntu:

how to change drive letter in linux

Make sure to let me know your doubts in the comment section.

Pranav Krishna

You might also like.

Install and setup FTP server on Ubuntu

Install and setup FTP server on Ubuntu

Sagar Sharma

How to Change Java Version in Ubuntu

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How to Open and Edit bashrc file in Ubuntu

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FlindoJimbori is offline

Show drive letters?

Is there a way to show the drive letters in nautilus or whatever the default file explorer is. for example... I want my hard drive to say C: and my flash drive to say D: please help.
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Paqman is offline

Re: Show drive letters?

Drive letters are a Windows thing, they aren't used in Linux. Instead we talk about mount points. For example, the partition that Windows calls C: could be mounted to your Linux filesystem as something like /host or /media/Windows. This is pretty much infinitely flexible, you can assign any chunk of actual storage to any location in the filesystem you want. For example, Windows might insist on calling your external drive F:, but in Linux you might decide that you want to have it mount to a location called /my_external_drive or /I_Like_Bananas. The default for removable storage like your flash drive is to get given an automatically assigned mount point in /media. If you really want it to look like it's using drive letters I suppose you could create a folder called /C and have that partition mount there.
Last edited by Paqman; July 25th, 2012 at 09:20 PM .

Bufeu is offline

Linux doesn't have drive letters. You can find every external drive (such as USB, Floppy, HDD) under /media . http://peter.upfold.org.uk/blog/2006...ders-on-linux/ http://grokdoc.net/index.php/Linux_c...#Drive_letters http://linuxconfig.org/Filesystem_Basics http://www.comptechdoc.org/os/linux/...ilestruct.html http://www.debianadmin.com/linux-dir...-overview.html
Last edited by Bufeu; July 25th, 2012 at 09:30 PM .

alan21276 is offline

Have you tried simply renaming the drive using the built in disc utility program? That might give you the effect of having a drive letter......even though Linux doesn't use them.

HiImTye is offline

you could also mount it to a folder called /C: - there's no reason not to use ':' in your folder structure

Morbius1 is offline

I'm not disagreeing with anyone who posted a response but I get the feeling from the original post that that he wants "/" to be "/C". Um ... I don't know if you can do that or not. I'm fairly certain that you cannot.
Last edited by Morbius1; July 25th, 2012 at 09:23 PM .
Originally Posted by Morbius1 I'm not disagreeing with anyone who posted a response but I get the feeling from the original post that that he wants "/" to be "/C". Um ... I don't know if you can do that or not. I'm fairly certain that you cannot. As an ex-widows user I can understand that the original poster might be experiencing a touch of culture shock (assuming they are new to linux/ubuntu) If this is the case then my advice would be to embrace your new file system and you will grow to like it and appreciate why it is the way it is.

Jay MC is offline

Originally Posted by Morbius1 I'm not disagreeing with anyone who posted a response but I get the feeling from the original post that that he wants "/" to be "/C". Um ... I don't know if you can do that or not. I'm fairly certain that you cannot. This is something that any non-Windows OS has to contend with... people bringing expectations that are based on what they're used to with Windows. This is also relevant to the "how easy are computers" discussion happening elsewhere. A lot of "easy" is based on what you're used to. Anyway, to bring this back on topic... to the OP, yup, "C:" is just a Windows concept. Does Ubuntu have a newbies' resource for people who are used to Windows? It's pragmatic to assume a Windows background. Wherever Linux does something differently, it would be good to take the bull of confusion by the horns and explain why it isn't relevant here and what you get instead. Another example would be package management (you don't just run .exes you downloaded off the web). If a newcomer is wondering how he can get his file explorer to show "drive letters", that feels like a bit of a failure for Ubuntu (insofar as it's trying to be "Linux for humans beings" - most of whom are used to Windows).
I dont think it's a failure at all, secondary mounted drives default to /media/ where it makes sense for them to go. it sounds more like a failure of expectations from the user. it would be nice, however, if Ubuntu had an 'orientation' type deal when a new install first logs in (bringing up 'Help') - it might give the user more of an understanding of how things work and what to expect edit: I think I remember older versions of Ubuntu doing that, or maybe I just opened help when I first logged in cause it was on the panel beside the launcher. who knows?
Last edited by HiImTye; July 25th, 2012 at 10:00 PM .
Originally Posted by HiImTye I dont think it's a failure at all, secondary mounted drives default to /media/ where it makes sense for them to go. it sounds more like a failure of expectations from the user. it would be nice, however, if Ubuntu had an 'orientation' type deal when a new install first logs in (bringing up 'Help') - it might give the user more of an understanding of how things work and what to expect edit: I think I remember older versions of Ubuntu doing that, or maybe I just opened help when I first logged in cause it was on the panel beside the launcher. who knows? Sorry, I don't mean a failure of Ubuntu as an operating system - I mean a failure of the introductory experience, to cope with the fact that many newbies will come with Windows-based expectations. The "orientation" thing you describe sounds exactly right.
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How to change drives (devices)

Post by georgius » Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:37 pm

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How to change Drive Letter?

I have dual boot (windows 7 and Ubuntu 11.04) I removed the system reserved partition letter from windows (desk management) and it ended for me with grub rescue terminal.

I think this means fail to find boot of both Windows and Ubuntu so how do I change back the letter? I prefer GUI more than terminal. The content of the system reserved partition didn't change so its only how will I change it back and I don't want to loose my system. I'm using Ubuntu live CD now.

I've read the old post here but it doesn't help me

Jorge Castro's user avatar

  • There is no such thing as drive letters in Ubuntu. It sounds like you deleted the Ubuntu partition by mistake. –  psusi Mar 3, 2012 at 18:43
  • Does Linux boot? If no, please run a Live-CD and give us the output of sudo fdisk -l . –  Bobby Mar 3, 2012 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

It seems that your dual boot was managed by the Windows boot loader.

It seems also that you have deleted the partition "system reserved" witch is needed by windows for booting (that partition does not have letter even under windows, it is a hidden partition needed by windows for it's boot process).

You need to repair windows 7. See this link at method 2

Then you'll need to redo your dualboot with ubuntu (see this )

Best regards.

Antoine Rodriguez's user avatar

Ubuntu does not use drive letters, so you may not be able to change them on Ubuntu. You can use programs like Partition Magic in windows to change the drive letters.

If you have a Windows rescue disk I would consider using it.

Ringtail's user avatar

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how to change drive letter in linux

How-To Geek

How to clear your update cache on windows 11 and 10.

Resolve update problems and free up storage space.

Quick Links

Why should you clear your windows update cache, clear windows update cache using file explorer, clear windows update cache using disk cleanup, clear windows update cache using command prompt, key takeaways.

  • To delete the update cache, open Run, type services.msc , right-click "Windows Update," and choose "Stop." Keep the window open.
  • Open Run again, type C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\ , select all files, right-click a file, and choose the trash can icon (Windows 11) or "Delete" (Windows 10).
  • Come back to the "Services" window, right-click "Windows Update," and choose "Start."

Both Windows 11 and Windows 10 make it super easy to clear your Windows Update cache. You can use a graphical method or a command line option to delete the saved update files. We’ll show you your available options.

There are many reasons you might want to clear your Windows Update cache.

You might be facing issues finding or installing updates , and clearing the cache often fixes the problem. Clearing the cache fixes issues with Windows Updates by forcing Windows to re-download all the required files.

Another reason is to free up storage space . Update cache files often use a huge chunk of the storage, and you can reclaim that by deleting those cached files. (Windows does delete some update files after installing those updates, but not all.)

An easy graphical way to delete the update cache is to use File Explorer. This method deletes all the update cache files.

To use this method, open the Run dialog box by pressing Windows+R. Type the following in the box and press Enter:

services.msc

In the Services window, find the Windows Update service. Right-click it and select "Stop." Keep this window open as you’ll come back here later.

Launch Run again using Windows+R, type the path below in the box, and press Enter. The following is the path to the Windows Update cache folder. It assumes that Windows is installed on your C:\ drive. However, if that’s not the case, just change the drive letter in the path.

C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\

Press Ctrl+A to select all files in the open folder . Right-click a selected file and choose the trash can icon (Windows 11) or "Delete" (Windows 10).

Close File Explorer and empty the Recycle Bin .

Then, return to the "Services" window, right-click "Windows Update," and choose "Start."

This ensures your PC can continue to look for the latest updates.

Windows’s built-in Disk Cleanup utility helps delete some Windows Update cache files.

To use it, open the Start Menu, search for Disk Cleanup , and launch the utility.

Select your Windows installation drive and choose "OK."

Select "Clean Up System Files."

Choose your Windows installation drive again and select "OK."

In Disk Cleanup, enable the "Windows Update Cleanup" option. Feel free to enable other options if you’d like to delete those files as well. Then, at the bottom, click "OK."

The tool will begin cleaning up the update cache files.

If you prefer command line methods over graphical ones, use a few commands in Command Prompt (or PowerShell) to remove the update cache.

Begin by opening the Start Menu, searching for Command Prompt , and selecting "Run as Administrator."

In the "User Account Control" (UAC) prompt, select "Yes."

Type the following lines in Command Prompt, and press Enter after each line. The first command disables the Windows Update service and the second command turns off the Background Intelligent Transfer Service service.

Next up, run the following command to make the Windows Update cache folder the current working directory.

cd %windir%\SoftwareDistribution

Type the following command and press Enter to delete the update cache.

del /f /s /q *.*

After clearing the cache, restart the services you stopped above. Do that by typing the following commands and pressing Enter after each line.

You’re done.

Use a Script to Clear Update Cache in a Single-Click

You can make a batch file out of the commands above to clear your Windows Update cache in just a single click. This is a convenient method if you delete your update cache files often.

To make that script, open the Start Menu, search for Notepad , and launch the app. Copy the code below and paste it in your Notepad document.

Save the file by choosing File > Save from the menu bar.

In the "Save As" window, select the folder where you want to save the script. Click the "Save as Type" drop-down menu and choose "All Files." Select the "File Name" field and enter a name of your choice. Then, append .bat at the end of the file name. This ensures Notepad saves the file as a batch script.

Then, click "Save."

In the future, to clear your Windows Update cache using the script, right-click the script file and select "Run as Administrator." In the User Account Control prompt, choose "Yes." The script will stop certain services, deletes the update cache files, and restarts the stopped services.

And that’s how you get rid of the update cache files using various ways on your Windows 11 or Windows 10 computer. We hope you find the methods useful.

IMAGES

  1. How To Change The Drive Letter

    how to change drive letter in linux

  2. How to Change Drive Letter of Partition

    how to change drive letter in linux

  3. How To Change The Drive In Command Prompt In Linux

    how to change drive letter in linux

  4. How to Change Drive Letter using Drive Letter Changer dChanger

    how to change drive letter in linux

  5. Allow Read Write & Change Drive Name

    how to change drive letter in linux

  6. Changing Drive Letter and Converting File System

    how to change drive letter in linux

VIDEO

  1. How to Change Drive Letter in Windows 11/10

  2. How to Change Drive Letter of HDD and SSD

  3. Change Drive Letter and Paths and Rename USB Drive 10/11

  4. Flash Drive Showing No Media 0 Bytes Fix In Windows 11 / 10

  5. Change Drive Letter Easily

  6. CHANGE DRIVE LETTER

COMMENTS

  1. What is the equivalent for switching drives in terminal on Linux?

    If you have a directory named /mnt/drive2 (/mnt is commonly used, but it can be in your home directory if you want), and your drive is /dev/sdb, with a single partition, then the simplest command is: sudo mount -t type /dev/sdb1 /mnt/drive2. where "type" is the type shown in the blkid command, such as ntfs, ext4, etc.

  2. terminal

    Install package using. sudo apt-get install mtools. unmount the external drive, Partitions generally need to be unmounted before you can fiddle with them, so unmount the partition of the device you want to change the label for: sudo umount <device>. where device name can be /dev/sdbx, you can find in sudo fdisk -l. Check the current label.

  3. server

    3. The standard way to fix this is to not use the device name (/dev/sdb) to mount it but instead use the UUID. Check /dev/disk/by*/ for your drive's uuid. (There are several other ways to get it as well.) Then instead of the device name, use UUID= followed by what you find. This answer could be enhanced by a link to instructions.

  4. What is the Linux drive naming scheme?

    So for example: the first (1) partition on your first (a) SATA drive is /dev/sda1. The third (3) partition on your second (b) SATA drive is /dev/sdb3. the second partition (2) of the second (b) IDE hard disk is '/dev/hdb2'. This device naming is more of a background one, as the actual point to access it a directory mount point.

  5. Hard drive/device partition naming convention in Linux

    See "Naming convention" in the Grub manual if you want more details. /dev/sda, /dev/sdb, etc, are the default names of hard disks (and other similar storage like flash disks of all kinds, but not CD or tape drives) under Linux. The last letter grows in the order in which the disks are detected. You may find /dev/hda, /dev/hdb, etc, on some ...

  6. How can I change the hard disk name in Ubuntu?

    1. In Ubuntu 13.04, you can use the native " e2label " from terminal. Steps: list the disks to see which is the one you want to change: sudo fdisk -l. change the disk name: sudo e2label /dev/sdb1 "mydiskname". Share.

  7. How to simply change the name of your hard drive in Linux

    1) Go to your applications. 2) Search for Disks. 3) Click on Disks to start the application. 4) Select the hard disk on the left. 5) Then select the partition to be renamed to the right under Volumes. 6) Click on the little block / stop icon to unmount the partition (Unmount selected partition) 7) Click on the gear icon.

  8. Change Name of Mounted Hard Drive

    The first word on a line is the device to mount: this is a name like /dev/sdx1, or a uuid like UUID=e7522030-f6e3..., or a label like LABEL=volume. The 2nd word is the directory to use as a mount point (dir must exist). If an entry doesn't exist for your disk, add it using preferable the UUID or LABEL in the first field, and your desired mount ...

  9. RenameUSBDrive

    Note that we're using the special "::" drive which allows us to specify the device descriptor on the command line; otherwise we'd have to edit ~/.mtoolsrc to assign a drive letter (see Option 2 under "Change the label"). Change the label. Option 1. After unmounting and checking the current label (above), use sudo mlabel -i <device> ::<label> ex:

  10. Ubuntu: Change or Assign a Drive Letter to an external hard drive (or

    Ubuntu: Change or Assign a Drive Letter to an external hard drive (or any drive)Helpful? ... Ubuntu: Change or Assign a Drive Letter to an external hard drive (or any drive)Helpful? Please support ...

  11. How to Mount and Unmount Storage Devices from the Linux Terminal

    Unmounting the ISO Image. To unmount a mounted file system, use the umount command. Note that there is no "n" between the "u" and the "m"---the command is umount and not "unmount." You must tell umount which file system you are unmounting. Do so by providing the file system's mount point. sudo umount /mnt.

  12. Assign drive/partition letters in Linux : r/linux4noobs

    Linux doesn't have drive letters. Instead you "mount" your partitions, that is you assign a folder to the partition so that you have the content of your partition under that folder. You can do that on the command line using. sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /some/folder/. Replace /dev/sdb1 with the device for your partition and /some/folder/ with any ...

  13. Assign Drive Letter in Linux?

    actually, if all you want to do is access the data on that small partition, XP should see it all right. It should already have a 'drive letter'. If you don't see it in my computer, right click on my computer, then management and then disk management and see what it tells you about your harddrive. you can also manually assign a drive letter to a ...

  14. According to which algorithm does Linux assign the hard drive letters?

    Sometimes the drive assignment will change even with the device mounted, and files on the changed drive become inaccessible. I'm running Ubuntu 16.04.4 LTS (Linux 4.4.-128-generic i686). I use sleep mode between daily sessions, and I suspect the drive gets reassigned when waking from sleep mode, although I'm not absolutely sure about this.

  15. Mount Drives in Ubuntu Command Line

    The mount command is a very popular one, which lets you mount a drive into a folder of your choice. It supports a wide range of partition types. The general format of the mount command is. sudo mount -t <TYPE> <DEVICE> /PATH/TO/FOLDER. In this command, the following are the ones to note.

  16. Drive letter for USB device and HDD devices in Linux kernel

    0. One useful investigation starting point code-wise would be function disk_name(), defined in block/partition-generic.c: /*. * disk_name() is used by partition check code and the genhd driver. * It formats the devicename of the indicated disk into. * the supplied buffer (of size at least 32), and returns.

  17. [SOLVED] Show drive letters?

    The default for removable storage like your flash drive is to get given an automatically assigned mount point in /media. If you really want it to look like it's using drive letters I suppose you could create a folder called /C and have that partition mount there. Last edited by Paqman; July 25th, 2012 at 09:20 PM .

  18. How to change drives (devices)

    Linux doesn't use drive letters. What we do is mount the filesystems of drives. Mounting a device can be as simple as opening the file manager and clicking on the device. Once mounted, the device's filesystem can be found at /media. So, if I had a disk partition named "Data" and I mounted it, I could navigate to it from the terminal with.

  19. Is This The Right Way To Change Drives Using Terminal?

    First, note there is a typo in mount your command. It should be: $ sudo mount /dev/sda2 /media/username. Here /dev/sda2 is the device (in this case, a hard drive's partition) you want to access, and /media/username is your mountpoint, i.e., the location in the filesystem where you want to mount the device.

  20. How to Change a Drive Letter on Windows 10 or Windows 11

    Changing a drive letter is pretty simple. Click the Start button, type "Disk Management" in the search bar, and then hit Enter. The program name displayed in the search will not be Disk Management. It will be "Create and format hard disk partitions." You could also hit Windows+X or right-click the Start button, and then click "Disk Management."

  21. ubuntu

    Not only that, if a drive drops off the bus and comes back, it'll often get a new letter. Or sometimes when you replace a failed drive (both of these happen because something still has a reference to the old drive, e.g., the "failed" entry in md-raid). There are stable identifiers; use them instead. Your udevadm info output told you what they are:

  22. windows

    2. Ubuntu does not use drive letters, so you may not be able to change them on Ubuntu. You can use programs like Partition Magic in windows to change the drive letters. If you have a Windows rescue disk I would consider using it. Share.

  23. How to Clear Your Update Cache on Windows 11 and 10

    Launch Run again using Windows+R, type the path below in the box, and press Enter. The following is the path to the Windows Update cache folder. It assumes that Windows is installed on your C:\ drive. However, if that's not the case, just change the drive letter in the path. C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\