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Hotel Task Force

Experienced teams to fill essential hospitality roles.

Solutions To Fill Critical Positions

Every property faces challenges when gaps in management open due to ownership turnover, maternity and medical leave, unplanned departures or simply a gap in the hiring process. HSS Task Force services offer hotels, resorts, and management companies  secure interim talent for General Managers, Sales Management, Operations Managers and a wide variety of associated staff.

Seasoned Professional in Hospitality

Every property faces challenges when gaps in management open due to ownership turnover, maternity and medical leave, unplanned departures or simply a gap in the hiring process.

HSS Task Force Professional Staffing services offers hotels, resorts, and management companies a resource to secure interim talent. Our Task Force professionals are seasoned and experienced, and will hit the ground running.

Because HSS is the largest supplier of hospitality staffing across the U.S., we have access to a large pool of talent to fill these types of positions.

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Fill The Gap

How it works, where we recruit, positions we fill with task force.

  • General Manager
  • Executive Chef
  • Housekeeping Manager
  • Front Office Manager
  • Human Resource Manager
  • Assistant General Manager
  • Accounting Manager
  • Restaurant Manager
  • Conference Service Manager
  • Supervisory position
  • Sales Manager
  • Catering Sales Manager
  • Director of Catering
  • Director of Sales & Marketing
  • Director of Revenue Management
  • Revenue Manager
  • Executive Housekeeper
  • Chief Engineer
  • Director of Food & Beverage
  • Banquet Manager
  • Director of Human Resources
  • Director of Operations/Rooms Division

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Support Reparations

Summary of the interim report.

On June 1, 2022, the California Task Force to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans released its Interim Report providing an in-depth overview of the cumulative, cascading, and continuing harms inflicted on African Americans resulting from 246 years of enslavement, 90 years of Jim Crow, and decades more of systemic discrimination. The Interim Report includes a preliminary set of recommendations to the California Legislature. A final report is expected to be issued in 2023.

The Reparations Task Force is a first-in-the-nation effort by a state government to study slavery, its effects throughout American history, and the compounding harms that the United States and Californian governments have inflicted upon African Americans.

Download the full report and related material : Full Interim Report Executive Summary Key Findings Preliminary Recommendations

Summary of California Task Force to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans

California Assembly Bill 3121 .  California Assembly Bill 3121 (AB 3121) (California Government Code Section 8301 et seq.) was enacted on September 30, 2020 and establishes a 9-Member the Task Force to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans. 

Purpose.   The purpose of the Task Force is: (1) to study and develop reparation proposals for African Americans; (2) to recommend appropriate ways to educate the California public of the task force’s findings; and (3) to recommend appropriate remedies in consideration of the Task Force’s findings.

Rationale for the Legislation.   The institution of slavery is inextricably woven into the establishment, history, and prosperity of the United States. Constitutionally and statutorily sanctioned from 1619 to 1865, slavery deprived more than four million Africans and their descendants of life, liberty, citizenship, cultural heritage, and economic opportunity. Following the abolition of slavery, government entities at the federal, state, and local levels continued to perpetuate, condone, and often profit from practices that brutalized African Americans and excluded them from meaningful participation in society. This legacy of slavery and racial discrimination has resulted in debilitating economic, educational, and health hardships that are uniquely experienced by African Americans.

Deliverables:   Task Force is legislatively required to issue a report in two parts:

  • Interim Report (Part 1) , released on June 1, 2022 , a sweeping study of almost 500 pages, and compiling and synthesizing the latest scholarly work cataloguing the harm of 400 years of oppression, and drawing a through-line leading to current day consequences.  The Interim Report has 13 chapters: documenting:
  • The Institution of Slavery, commencing with the Transatlantic Slave Trade, with slavery and White supremacy as foundations for colonial America and the founding of the United States, to the Civil War, the undermining of Reconstruction, and reneging of reparations promises, and theft of land, wages, businesses, etc.;
  • Exclusion of Blacks from political participation by violence, voter suppression through poll taxes, literacy, and other tactics, gerrymandering, etc.;
  • Housing policies following the Civil War that for the next 130 years that caused cities to be racially segregated through violence, zoning, redlining, restrictive covenants,  condemnation/eminent domain, freeway construction;
  • Education—250 years of prohibiting literacy of the enslaved, followed by multiple strategies to limit or deny education, and segregate it, enforced by  Black Codes, Jim Crow, segregated  and unequal education to the present day; states’ denial of access to G.I. bill educational benefits; erasure of history and perpetuation of “Lost Cause” mythology;  
  • Racial Terror—slavery era was followed by 95 years of terrorism, lynching, mob violence, mass murder, vigilantism, police extra-judicial murders, as a form of social control and maintenance of the social order; rise of the KKK and White supremacist groups, spurring Great Migration from end of 1800’s to 1950’s; hate crimes today;
  • Public Health and Mental Health—slavery established foundation for discriminatory healthcare system of today; medical experimentation treating Blacks as human guinea pigs “it was cheaper to use niggers than cats” Harry Bailey, neurosurgeon speech at Tulane Medical School (1960’s); eugenics, pseudo-science theories that persist today; Blacks sicker and die younger than Whites; life expectancies correlate with zip codes;
  • Environment—harms caused by substandard housing and pollution in segregated neighborhoods; zoning and redlining which pushed polluting industries into Black neighborhoods; as of 1983, 3 out of 4 communities with heavy hazardous waste landfills were predominantly Black, and Blacks are 75% more likely to live near oil and gas facilities; exposure to traffic, lead, poor access to nutritious food; climate change-extreme weather disproportionately impacts Black communities;
  • Justice System—Slave Codes, Black Codes, post-emancipation vagrancy laws criminalizing ordinary behavior (e.g. learning to read, making loud noises, smoking) essentially re-enslaving Blacks through convict leasing; modern-day “law and order”, “war on drugs”, “tough on crime,” “driving while Black”, policing policies resulting in mass incarceration; extra-judicial killings in encounters with law enforcement; school to prison pipeline, and conviction on records used to disqualify Blacks from employment, housing, etc.;
  • Arts, Culture and Faith—religious institutions that profited from slavery and used religion to promote docility; the racist stereotyping, censorship, appropriation of art and culture, and exploitation of Blacks, from minstrelsy, to dehumanizing propaganda narratives (e.g. Birth of a Nation promoting the Lost Cause myth), to monuments honoring the Confederacy and White supremacists; exclusion and exploitation of Black musicians, artists, athletes, authors, banning of books such as the Color Purple; the confiscation of Black leisure venues such as Bruce’s Beach resort;
  • Family—Decimation of the Black family, loss of identity, family separation, etc. resulting from slavery, post-emancipation re-enslavement of children through apprentice programs, Jim Crow, continuing disparities in opportunity, impact of criminal justice system, foster care to prison pipeline, etc.; 
  • Labor—Black Codes, before and after Civil War excluded Blacks from employment; post-Civil War re-enslavement by sharecropping and convict leasing re-supplied former slave-owners with labor; wage theft enforced by racial violence; Jim Crow restricted travel and employment; 19th century opportunities for Blacks in the North worse than in the South as White workers excluded and attacks Blacks, with Northern and Southern Whites gradually developing a consensus of exclusion; New Deal protections excluded Blacks (e.g. exclusion of agricultural and domestic services, jobs held overwhelmingly by Blacks, not covered by Fair Labor Standards Act or Social Security); rampant racism in unions; military service segregated and did not result in benefits (e.g. 98% of G.I. guaranteed housing loans, one of the nation’s most significant transfers of wealth, went to Whites—not surprising as these federal funds were administered by states); employment discrimination despite passage of civil rights laws; deindustrialization of cities; challenges to affirmative action in employment; cumulative result is widening wage gap;
  • Wealth Accumulation and the Contemporary Racial Wealth Gap—Wealth—i.e. what you own minus liabilities—is key to economic security, racial wealth gap is increasing each year, following centuries of policies restricting Black Americans ability to build, maintain, and pass on wealth; in 2019, financial assets of White households were more than 9 times that of Black households; Blacks excluded from government sponsored wealth transfers such as Homestead Act of 1862, GI Bill, etc; and redlining denying Blacks access to federally insured FHA-backed loans; destruction of Black businesses by racial terror, segregation, urban renewal/redevelopment, and freeways; loan discrimination and restrictive covenants prevented Blacks from moving to suburbs; Great Recession cause decline of Black wealth by 53% between 2005 to 2019; intergenerational wealth transfers, the building blocks of wealth, are unlikely or small; pre-pandemic studies found that 58% of Blacks have almost no liquid assets.
  • Significant Government Sponsored Report.  The 1967-68 National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, known as the Kerner Commission was an 11-member Presidential Commission established to investigate the causes of the urban uprisings of 1967.  The report was released in 1968, blaming the riots on lack of economic opportunity, failed social service programs, police brutality, and racism, and warned: “Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white—separate and unequal.” While the Kerner report discussed in about 40 pages the connection between the oppression of the past and its continuing consequences today, the Interim Report more deeply synthesize the recent research of scholars showing the widening racial wealth gap and other results of layer after layer of horrific anti-Black racism over a 400 year period.   
  • Part 2 of the report, to be released in June of 2023 , will discuss definition of reparations, examples of reparations domestically and internationally, responsibility to pay reparations (e.g. federal government and state of California); eligibility, form of reparations, and how reparations might be calculated. As of February, 2022, the Task Force is commencing discussion on Part 2 of the report. 

Progress as of July, 2022 :

  • 9 public hearings have been convened since June of 2021, with more to be scheduled commencing in September, 2022 and thereafter;  
  • Experts and lay witnesses have provided testimony on the subject matter areas listed above;
  • Commencing in February, in addition to the Task Force’s public hearings, the Task Force has conducted “listening sessions” throughout California to hear testimony of the impact of the legacy of slavery, and the cumulative layers of racism and exclusion that continued thereafter to the present day;
  • On June 1, 2022, the Task Force released Interim Report tracking the harm of slavery and its badges and incidents thereafter.  In September of 2022, the Task Force will commence discussion of what the repair and reparations that ultimately it will recommend to the Californai legislature and the public.
  • The Task Force is in the process of surveying District Attorneys’ Offices and Courts in 58 counties with respect to the data these entities collect for the purpose of determining the presence of racial bias in criminal justice administration decisions pertaining to charging, prosecuting, sentencing, diversion, etc.    
  • State Efforts.  California is the first state to form a reparations task force, but Vermont is considering doing something similar:
Vermont Senate gives tentative OK to creating a state truth and reconciliation commission
  • Local Government Efforts.  While state task forces similar to the California Reparations Task Force might be a political impossibility (for now) in most states, other locales are launching their own inquiries:
  • California Cities and Counties
  • Los Angeles (Eric Garcetti)
  • Sacramento, CA (Daryl Steinberg)
  • San Francisco (City and County; (led by Supervisor Shamann Walton)
  • Alameda (County) (led by Supervisor Nate Miley)
  • Non-California Cities
  • Kansas City
  • Tullahase, OK
  • Providence, RI
  • Carrboro, NC
  • St. Paul, MN
  • Nashville, TN
  • Ashville, Tennessee
  • Evanston, Illinois
  • Charleston, SC [June 9, 2020]
  • Ferguson, MO [November 18, 2014 created and appointed by Governor Jay Nixon]
  • Philadelphia
  • Iowa City, Iowa
  • Minneapolis, MN [planning phase]
  • New York City (Charter Commission)
  • Detroit, Michigan
  • Borough of Carlisle, PA
  • Smaller Scale Discussions.  Individual organizations have also launched their own inquiries and projects; see e.g. Ohio State Divided Communities Project; efforts by religious institutions to atone for enslaving Blacks.  In other words, discussion on this subject matter could be commenced by other organizations, however large or small.
  • Congressional  Bills

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Presidential Task Force on Combating Antisemitism

About the task force.

Among the repercussions of conflict in the Middle East have been the loss of family and friends among many members of our community, as well as feelings of uncertainty, abandonment, mistrust, and fear. Incidents of bias and hate against Jews and Israelis and against Muslims, Palestinians, and other people of Arab descent have risen across the country. Reports of antisemitic, anti-Muslim, and Anti-Arab acts on our campus have grown, and the sense of belonging among these groups has been undermined. We need to understand why and how that is happening—and what more we might do to prevent it.

In January 2024, Interim President Alan M. Garber announced two presidential task forces: one devoted to combating antisemitism and one devoted to combating anti-Muslim and anti-Arab bias. Though differently focused, the groups are similarly charged with:

  • examining recent history and current manifestations of bias;
  • identifying the causes of and contributing factors to bias-based behaviors on campus;
  • evaluating evidence regarding the characteristics and frequency of these behaviors; and
  • recommending approaches to combat bias and to mitigate its impact on campus.

Read below for more information on the Presidential Task Force on Combating Antisemitism. For information on the other presidential task force, see  Presidential Task Force on Combating Anti-Muslim and Anti-Arab Bias .

The Presidential Task Force on Combating Antisemitism will examine the recent history of antisemitism and its current manifestations on the Harvard campus. It will identify causes of and contributing factors to anti-Jewish behaviors on campus; evaluate evidence regarding the characteristics and frequency of these behaviors; and recommend approaches to combat antisemitism and its impact on campus.

The task force’s work will encompass three areas:

  • Outreach and listening tours to document experiences of antisemitism across the Harvard community, building on and learning from previous work done in this domain;
  • Historical analysis, focusing on the experiences of and attitudes towards Jewish and Israeli members of the Harvard community and how they have been affected by local and global events;
  • Collection and analysis of data from members of the Harvard community, in order to characterize the nature, extent, and proximate causes of antisemitism in the Harvard community.

The above three tasks will help identify actions that can be taken to address bias on a rolling basis and will culminate in a report and set of recommendations to the President. The recommendations may touch upon student life, supportive measures, School and University policies, education, and training, as well as other areas related to the climate on campus. The President is committed to bringing the recommendations to the members of the Academic Leadership Council, including the deans, on a rolling basis so that they might consider, refine, and implement interventions within the Schools.

Timeline                                                

The task force will begin work simultaneously in its three areas of focus. During the first weeks of public engagement, however, the task force will prioritize outreach and conduct listening tours to understand experiences of community members and learn from work already done internally and externally as well. The task force may produce interim recommendations shortly after the conclusion of this listening period. Upon completing its work, the task force will issue a final report with its findings and recommendations. Updates on the task force’s progress will be posted on this page.

The task force aims to carry out its work in a transparent and timely manner while proceeding with care and empathy. Its ongoing efforts, including descriptions of analyses and methodologies utilized, will be published on this page. The task force will work in close collaboration with the Task Force on Combating Anti-Muslim and Anti-Arab Bias throughout the duration of its activity in order to coordinate efforts and methodologies, although each group will have the flexibility to pursue additional sources of information and consider interventions independent of the other.  

Contacting the Task Force

The task force seeks the observations and advice of members of the Harvard community at all levels, and may be reached at [email protected] .

Note, however, that the task force is not responsible for addressing specific crimes, bias incidents, or bullying concerns, or enforcing University policies, including those related to protests. Such responsibility lies with the University and the Schools. Please refer to the resources listed on the University’s Resources in Times of Crisis website for further information in this regard.

Furthermore, it is beyond the task force’s mandate to comment on specific incidents that have transpired or might transpire on campus during the course of its work.

  • Jared Ellias , co-chair, Scott C. Collins Professor of Law at Harvard Law School
  • Derek Penslar , co-chair, William Lee Frost Professor of Jewish History in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences
  • Danielle Allen , James Bryant Conant University Professor
  • Boaz Barak, Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science in the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
  • Erica Newman-Corre , Student at Harvard Law School
  • Jesse M. Fried , Dane Professor of Law at Harvard Law School
  • Jerome Groopman , Dina and Raphael Recanati Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School
  • Nim Ravid , Student at Harvard College
  • Vicki Rosen , Professor of Developmental Biology at Harvard School of Dental Medicine
  • Kay Kaufman Shelemay , G. Gordon Watts Professor of Music and Professor of African and African American Studies
  • Andrew Teeter , Professor of Hebrew Bible at Harvard Divinity School
  • Sherri Charleston , advisor, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer
  • Ara Gershengorn , advisor, University Attorney
  • Robin Glover , advisor, Associate Provost for Student Affairs
  • Jonah Steinberg , advisor, Executive Director Emeritus at Harvard Hillel

Updates from the Task Force

The Presidential Task Force on Combating Antisemitism was announced by Interim President Alan M. Garber on January 19, 2024.

The Task Force is currently engaged in outreach to the University community through a number of channels. It has also invited the community to share feedback via a dedicated email account at [email protected] .

Across the University, efforts are also underway at the School level to provide local support to the community.

This page will share periodic updates on the work of the Task Force, as well as community events and resources of interest.

  • February 25, 2024: University names task force members in efforts to combat antisemitism, anti-Arab and anti-Muslim bias
  • March 22, 2024: Presidential task forces announce listening sessions
  • April 9, 2024: Co-chairs of task forces share updates on community engagement

Building upon recent actions

The Task Forces will be learning from and building on actions that have taken place across Harvard University in recent months. These include efforts to address instances of antisemitism and anti-Muslim and anti-Arab bias on campus, provide additional support services for students and other Harvard community members, and promote an atmosphere of civil discourse at Harvard. Some of this work is highlighted below.

Supporting students and other Harvard community members

  • Harvard launched a new support and resources website, Resources in Times of Crisis , to provide community members with a central hub of resources for personal safety, online safety, and mental health and community support.
  • The website also links to a guide on Protecting against Online Abuse and Harassment , which serves as a resource for community members who have been targeted for online abuse, harassment, and intimidation.
  • In January 2024, Harvard University Health Services removed visit limits for outpatient mental health care and medical consultations under Harvard’s student health insurance plan.
  • Harvard engaged with the leadership of Sidechat, a social media app that allows college students to post anonymously. Though Harvard has no relationship to Sidechat, the University asked the app to strictly enforce its content-moderation policies.
  • Harvard College formed a Task Force on Online Harassment to serve as a centralized point of contact for issues relating to doxing, online harassment, and online security.
  • Interim president Alan M. Garber and the University deans issued a community-wide message reaffirming Harvard’s commitment to its University-Wide Statement on Rights and Responsibilities and offering further guidance for planned expressive activity (including protests) for students, faculty, staff, and disciplinary boards. Several Schools have adopted or are in the process of adopting policies or guidance in addition to the Statement.

Promoting civil discourse, dialogue, and education

  • The 2024 spring term began with events across the University organized under the Harvard Dialogues initiative, organized aimed at enhancing respectful and robust debate.
  • The Edmond & Lily Safra Center for Ethics has engaged in a Center-wide effort to expand its longstanding work on civil discourse, including a new Fellowship in Values Engagement , which works with resident tutors to foster intellectual vitality by promoting ethical reflection and a culture of civil disagreement in undergraduate community life.
  • Harvard College launched a new website for the Intellectual Vitality initiative focused on promoting respectful dialogue, open and rigorous inquiry, and thoughtful listening.
  • Harvard College and PEN America hosted the Intellectual Vitality and Free Expression Student Summit aimed at fostering open, productive communication.

Who should I contact?

Harvard University is committed to providing a safe campus environment. If you have experienced an incident of bias, read through the options in this section to understand the best next steps.

To learn more about support resources available across campus, see Resources in Times of Crisis .

If you wish to share your feedback with the Task Force, please send an email to [email protected] .

Alternatively, you may submit anonymous feedback via our feedback form .

Contact HUPD immediately at  617-495-1212  if your  physical safety is threatened  at any time or if you receive an  email that contains a physical threat  to your life, safety, or property.

First, contact one of your School’s Local Designated Resources (LDRs). They are available to assist community members who may have experienced bullying or discrimination, and will be able to discuss your concerns and advise you on your options.

If for any reason, including potential conflicts of interest, you do not feel comfortable speaking with your LDRs, contact the Office of Community Conduct (OCC). Similar to engaging with an LDR, OCC will be able to discuss concerns and advise you on your options. OCC will coordinate with LDRs within your School or Unit as appropriate.

You may also wish to contact the Harvard Ombuds Office , a confidential resource available to anyone from the Harvard community where you can voice concerns, clarify goals, and consider options. Any  issue affecting one’s work or studies may be brought to an Ombuds. Discussion with an Ombuds is not the same as filing a complaint.

Contact the Anonymous Reporting Hotline.

The Hotline may be most useful for making the University aware of issues or concerns when you do not wish to file a formal complaint. Reports are accepted 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Reported issues are referred to the relevant School or Unit for review and follow up. Reporters have the option to remain anonymous and are provided with a means to communicate anonymously with the hotline while their case is open. If you would like to engage in a conversation or learn more about University policies, your LDR or the Ombuds Office may be better options.

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Executive Order on the Establishment of Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of   Families

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to reunite children separated from their families at the United States-Mexico border, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1.  Policy.   It is the policy of my Administration to respect and value the integrity of families seeking to enter the United States. My Administration condemns the human tragedy that occurred when our immigration laws were used to intentionally separate children from their parents or legal guardians (families), including through the use of the Zero-Tolerance Policy. My Administration will protect family unity and ensure that children entering the United States are not separated from their families, except in the most extreme circumstances where a separation is clearly necessary for the safety and well-being of the child or is required by law.

Sec. 2.  Establishment.  There is hereby established an Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families (Task Force).

Sec. 3.  Membership.   (a)  The Task Force shall include the following members or their designees:

(i)    the Secretary of Homeland Security, who shall serve as Chair;

(ii)   the Secretary of State, who shall serve as a Vice Chair;

(iii)  the Secretary of Health and Human Services, who shall serve as a Vice Chair;

(iv)   the Attorney General;

(v)    such other officers or employees of the Departments of State, Justice, Health and Human Services, and Homeland Security, as the head of each respective department may designate; and

(vi)   such other officers or employees of executive departments and agencies (agencies) as the Chair or Vice Chairs may invite to participate, with the concurrence of the head of the agency concerned.

(b)  The Chair shall convene and preside at meetings of the Task Force.  The Chair, in consultation with the Vice Chairs, shall direct its work and, as appropriate, establish and direct subgroups of the Task Force.

Sec. 4.  Functions.   The Task Force shall, consistent with applicable law, perform the following functions:

(a)  Identifying all children who were separated from their families at the United States-Mexico border between January 20, 2017, and January 20, 2021, in connection with the operation of the Zero-Tolerance Policy;

(b)  To the greatest extent possible, facilitating and enabling the reunification of each of the identified children with their families by:

(i)    providing recommendations to heads of agencies concerning the exercise of any agency authorities necessary to reunite the children with their families, including:

(A)  recommendations regarding the possible exercise of parole under section 212(d)(5)(A) of the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1952, as amended (8 U.S.C. 1182(d)(5)(A)), or the issuance of visas or other immigration benefits, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law; 

(B)  recommendations regarding the provision of additional services and support to the children and their families, including trauma and mental health services; and

(C)  recommendations regarding reunification of any additional family members of the children who were separated, such as siblings, where there is a compelling humanitarian interest in doing so;

(ii)   providing recommendations to the President concerning the exercise of any Presidential authorities necessary to reunite the children with their families, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law; and

(iii)  for purposes of developing the recommendations described in this subsection, and in particular with respect to recommendations regarding the manner and location of reunification, consulting with the children, their families, representatives of the children and their families, and other stakeholders, and considering the families’ preferences and parental rights as well as the children’s well-being; and

(c)  Providing regular reports to the President, including:

(i)    an initial progress report no later than 120 days after the date of this order;

(ii)   interim progress reports every 60 days thereafter;

(iii)  a report containing recommendations to ensure that the Federal Government will not repeat the policies and practices leading to the separation of families at the border, no later than 1 year after the date of this order; and

(iv)   a final report when the Task Force has completed its mission.  

Sec. 5.  Task Force Administration.  (a)  To the extent permitted by law, and subject to the availability of appropriations, the Department of Homeland Security shall provide the funding and administrative support the Task Force needs to implement this order, as determined by the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(b)  To the extent permitted by law, including the Economy Act (31 U.S.C. 1535), and subject to the availability of appropriations, additional agencies represented on the Task Force may detail staff to the Task Force, or otherwise provide administrative support, as necessary to implement this order, as determined by the respective heads of agencies.

(c)  The Task Force shall coordinate, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law, with relevant stakeholders, including domestic and international non-governmental organizations, and representatives of the children and their families.

(d)  The Task Force, at the direction of the Chair, may hold public meetings and engagement sessions as necessary to carry out its mission.

(e)  The Task Force shall terminate 30 days after it provides its final report to the President under section 4(c)(iv) of this order.  

Sec. 6.  Revocation of Executive Order 13841.   Executive Order 13841 of June 20, 2018 (Affording Congress an Opportunity To Address Family Separation), is hereby revoked.

Sec. 7.  Definitions.   For purposes of this order:

(a)  The term “children” includes all persons who were under the age of 18 at the time they were separated from their families at the border.

(b)  The term “Zero-Tolerance Policy” means the policy discussed in the Attorney General’s memorandum of April 6, 2018, entitled, “Zero-Tolerance for Offenses Under 8 U.S.C. § 1325(a),” and any other related policy, program, practice, or initiative resulting in the separation of children from their families at the United States-Mexico border.

Sec. 8.  General Provisions.   (a)  Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i)   the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii)  the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b)  This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c)  This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR. 

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  • Ghanaian peacekeepers: Keeping the UN flag flying high despite crisis
  • UNIFIL head reassures mayors of south-eastern Lebanon of continued support
  • More firefighters benefit from UNIFIL support
  • Statement by UNIFIL Head of Mission and Force Commander Lt. General Aroldo Lázaro on the occasion...
  • Joint Statement of UN Special Coordinator for Lebanon Joanna Wronecka and UNIFIL Head of Mission...
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  • On the anniversary of its Establishment, UNIFIL calls for full implementation of Resolution 1701
  • UNIFIL Indian vets treat livestock caught in exchanges of fire
  • Peacekeepers persevere in assisting local communities

interim task force

As UNIFIL marked the 46th anniversary of its establishment today, its leadership renewed calls for all actors to put down their weapons, recommit to Security Council Resolution 1701, and work toward a political and diplomatic solution.

interim task force

UNIFIL Ghanaian peacekeepers in their main base in the village of Al Qawzah, south Lebanon. (Photo: Haidar Fahs/UNIFIL)

Peacekeeping amidst daily exchanges of fire – sometimes receiving direct hits – can be a formidable undertaking. 

interim task force

Meeting mayors and religious authorities from seven municipalities of south-eastern Lebanon yesterday, UNIFIL Head of Mission and Force Commander Lieutenant General Aroldo Lázaro thanked attendees for their continued support for peacekeepers and reassured them of the mission’s continued assistanc

interim task force

As part of UNIFIL’s efforts to enhance capacity of local emergency workers in south Lebanon, the mission’s French-led Force Commander’s Reserve (FCR) unit recently conducted first aid training for firefighters of the Frun fire station and donated basic first aid kits.

interim task force

Ramadan should be a time of peace and reflection, but the current situation along the Blue Line has deeply affected these notions.  

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28 mar 2024, 19 mar 2024.

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27 Feb 2024

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Review of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program: Interim Report to the Attorney General Fiscal Years 2010 and 2011

The U.S. Justice Department's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) presents to the Attorney General its interim report on work of the Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task forces, as mandated by the Providing Resources, Officers, and Technology to Eradicate Cyber Threats to Our Children (PROTECT) Act of 2008.

The ICAC Task Force Program has been operating since 1998. It is a national network of 61 coordinated task forces representing approximately 1,000 Federal, State, local, and tribal law enforcement and prosecutorial agencies. These agencies engage in investigations, forensic examinations, and prosecutions related to technology-facilitated sexual exploitation of children and Internet crimes against children. In addition, the task forces provide forensic and investigative technical assistance to law enforcement and prosecutors as well as educational information to parents, educators, prosecutors, law enforcement, and others concerned with child victimization. By helping State, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies develop effective and sustainable responses to online child victimization and child pornography. This report presents data on the accomplishments reported by the 61 ICAC task forces in fiscal years 2010 and 2011. This encompasses the number of complaints of alleged child sexual victimization reviewed and the number of resulting arrests throughout the United States. Data are also reported on the number and training of law enforcement officers involved, the number of investigations and forensic examinations, the number of children who were victims of some form of abuse and neglect. In addition data are provided on the number and locations of ICAC task forces; the Federal grants awarded to each task force, affiliated law enforcement agencies and other partners, referrals to U.S. attorneys for prosecution, investigative technical assistance provided by tasks forces, and community outreach and education provided by task forces.

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Inside Task Force Lima’s exploration of 180-plus generative AI use cases for DOD

By Brandi Vincent

November 6, 2023

interim task force

Task Force Lima continues to gain momentum across a variety of pursuits in its ambitious, 18-month plan to ensure the Pentagon can responsibly adopt, implement and secure powerful, still-maturing generative artificial intelligence technologies.

Department of Defense leadership formed that new hub in August ​​within the Chief Digital and AI Office’s (CDAO) Algorithmic Warfare Directorate. Its ultimate mission is to set and steer the enterprise’s path forward with the emerging field of generative AI and associated large language models, which yield (convincing but not always correct) software code, images and other media following human prompts. 

Such capabilities hold a lot of promise, but also complex challenges for the DOD — including many that remain unseen. 

“Task Force Lima has three phases: the ‘learn phase,’ an ‘accelerate phase’ and a ‘guide phase.’ The ‘learn phase’ is where we are performing, for lack of a better word, inventories of what is the demand signal for generative AI across the department. That includes projects that are ongoing, to projects that we think should go forward, to projects that we would like to learn more about. And so, we submitted that as an inquiry to the department — and we’ve received a volume of use cases around 180 that go into many different categories and into many different mission areas,” Task Force Lima Mission Commander Navy Capt. M. Xavier Lugo told DefenseScoop. 

In a recent interview, the 28-year Naval officer-turned AI acceleration lead, briefed DefenseScoop about what’s to come with those under-review use cases, a recent “Challenge Day,” and future opportunities and events the task force is planning.

180-plus instances

During his first interview with DefenseScoop back in late September, Lugo confirmed that the task force would be placing an explicit emphasis on enabling generative AI in “low-risk mission areas.”

“That is still the case. However, some of what has evolved from that is they’re not all theoretical. For some of these use cases, there are units that have already started working with those particular technologies and they’re integrating [them] into their workflows. That’s when we’re going to switch from the ‘learn phase’ into the ‘accelerate phase,’ which is where we will partner with the use cases that are ongoing,” Lugo told DefenseScoop in the most recent interview.

At a Pentagon press briefing about the state of AI last week, Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks confirmed that the department launched Task Force Lima because it is “mindful of the potential risks and benefits offered by large language models” (LLMs) and other associated generative AI tools.

“Candidly, most commercially available systems enabled by large language models aren’t yet technically mature enough to comply with our DOD ethical AI principles — which is required for responsible operational use. But we have found over 180 instances where such generative AI tools could add value for us with oversight like helping to debug and develop software faster, speeding analysis of battle damage assessments, and verifiably summarizing texts from both open-source and classified datasets,” Hicks told reporters.

The deputy secretary noted that “not all of these use cases” that the task force is exploring are notional.

Some Defense Department components started looking at generative AI even before ChatGPT and similar products “captured the world’s attention,” she said. And a few department insiders have “even made their own models,” by isolating and fine-tuning foundational models for a specific task with clean, reliable and secure DOD data.

“While we have much more evaluating to do, it’s possible some might make fewer factual errors than publicly available tools — in part because, with effort, they can be designed to cite their sources clearly and proactively. Although it would be premature to call most of them operational, it’s true that some are actively being experimented with and even used as part of people’s regular workflows — of course, with appropriate human supervision and judgment — not just to validate, but also to continue improving them,” Hicks said. 

Lugo offered an example of those more non-theoretical generative AI use cases that have already been maturing within DOD.

“As you can imagine, the military has a lot of policies and publications, [tactics, techniques, and procedures, or TTPs], and all sorts of documentation out there for particular areas — let’s say in the human resources area, for example. So, one of those projects would be how do I interact with all those publications and policies that are out there to answer questions that a particular person may have on how to do a procedure or a policy?” he told DefenseScoop.

Among its many responsibilities, one that the CDAO leadership has charged Task Force Lima with is coming up with acceptability criteria and a maturity model for each use case or groups of use cases encompassing generative AI. 

“So, if we say we need an acceptability criteria of a particular value for a capability of summarization for LLMs, let’s say just as an example, then we need a model that matches that and that has that type of maturity in that particular capability. This is analogous to the self-driving vehicle maturity models and how you can have a different level of maturity in a self-driving vehicle for different road conditions. So, in our case the road conditions will be our acceptability criteria, and the model being able to meet that acceptability will be that maturity model,” Lugo explained.

‘Put me in, coach!’

Soon, the Lima team will start collecting information needed to inform its specific deliverables, including new test-and-evaluation frameworks, mitigation techniques, risk assessments and more.

“That output that we get during the ‘accelerate phase’ will be the input for the ‘guide phase,’ which is our last phase where we compile the deliverables to the CDAO Council so they can then make a determination into policy,” Lugo explained.

The task force does not have authority to officially publish guidance on generative AI deployments in DOD, but members previously made recommendations to the CDAO’s leadership that were approved to advise defense components in their efforts. The task force drafted that interim LLM guidance, but due to its classification level it has not been disseminated widely.

“That guidance [included that] any service can publish its own guidance that is more restrictive than the one that [the Office of the Secretary of Defense] publishes,” Lugo said. 

The Navy offered its version of interim guardrails on generative AI and LLMs in September. Shortly after that, the Space Force transmitted a memo that put a temporary pause on guardians’ use of web-based generative AI tools like ChatGPT for its workforce — specifically citing data security concerns.

“Did I learn about the Space Force guidance before it went out? Yes. Would I have had any reason to try to modify that? No,” Lugo told DefenseScoop.

“Space Force — like any other service — has the right to pursue guidance that is even more restrictive than the guidance that is provided by the policy. So, I just want to be clear that they have autonomy to publish their own guidance. At Task Force Lima, we are coordinating with the services — and they understand our viewpoints, and we understand our viewpoints, and there is no conflict on viewpoints here,” he added. And although it might make sense for one military branch to ban certain uses on a non-permanent basis to address data and security concerns, Lugo noted that doesn’t mean the task force should not be cautiously experimenting with models that are publicly accessible, in order to learn more about them.

In his latest interview with DefenseScoop, the task force chief also stated that his team is “not trying to do this in a vacuum.”

“We are definitely not only working with DOD, but we are working with industry and academia — and actually any organization that is interested in generative AI, they can reach out to us. There’s plenty of work, and there’s plenty of areas of involvement,” Lugo said.

“Also, I want to make sure that just because we are interacting with industry, that doesn’t take us out of the industry-agnostic, technology-agnostic hat. I am always ensuring that we keep that, because that’s what keeps us as an honest broker of this technology,” he added.

Lugo’s currently leading a core team of roughly 15 personnel. But he’s also engaging with a still-growing “expanded team” of close to 500 points of contacts associated with the task force’s activities and aims. To him, those officials are essentially on secondary duty, or a support function to his unit.

“We’re getting more people interested. Now, those 500 people — I’ve got everything from people watching from the bleachers, to personnel saying, ‘Hey, put me in coach!’ So, I’ve got a broad spectrum,” Lugo said.

Nearly 250 people attended a recent “Challenge Day” that the CDAO hosted to connect with industry and academic partners about the challenges associated with implementing generative AI within the DOD.

“There’s a lot of interest in the area, but there’s not that many companies in it. So what we saw was that it’s not just the normal names that you would hear on a day to day basis — but there’s also a lot of companies interested in integrating models. There’s companies that are not necessarily known for LLMs or generative AI, but they are known for other types of integration in the data space and in the AI space. So that was good, because that means that there’s a good pool of talent that will be working on the challenges that we have submitted to industry,” Lugo said.

According to Lugo, the cadre has received more than 120 responses to the recent request for information released to the public to garner input on existing generative AI use cases and critical technical obstacles that accompany its emergence.

The RFI is about learning “what are the insights out there, what are the approaches to solving these particular challenges that we have. And as we compile that information, we will then go ahead and do a more formal solicitation through the proper processes,” he said. On Nov. 30, industry and academic partners will have an additional opportunity this year to meet with Task Force Lima at the CDAO Industry Day. And down the line during the CDAO’s first in-person symposium — which is set to take place Feb. 20-22 in Washington — an entire track will be dedicated to Task Force Lima and generative AI.

Attendee registration opened in October, and the office is now accepting submissions for potential speakers at that event.

“I’m very optimistic that the challenges that we have submitted will be addressed — and hopefully corrected — by some innovative techniques,” Lugo told DefenseScoop.

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Oklahoma governor's reservation safety task force is wrapping up. Here's what is in store

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The governor’s task force aimed at resolving jurisdictional disputes on tribal reservations expects to issue a report next week with a “blueprint” to modernize public safety agreements between state and tribal governments.

It is unclear exactly what issues the One Oklahoma Task Force will cover in its report — or how its suggestions will differ from the reams of state-tribal agreements already in place. It also remains to be seen whether tribal officials will embrace the ideas put forward by a task force made up of state officials, lawmakers and law enforcement officers. No one representing a tribal nation is part of the group.

Tricia Everest, Oklahoma’s public safety secretary who chairs the task force, acknowledged that some issues the group has discussed are too complex to be fully addressed. Gov. Kevin Stitt gave the task force five months, ending June 1, to complete its work.

“This won’t solve all the problems, yet it brings a lot of the right people to the table to address” issues moving forward, Everest said after the task force met Monday for its second to last time. It will meet again May 20 to finalize its report, which will be delivered to Stitt, legislative leaders, tribal elected officials and the state’s congressional delegation.

More: An Oklahoma trooper ticketed a driver over her tribal license plate. What happened next?

State lawmakers likely will hold hearings in the fall to study the most complicated issues that came up during the task force’s discussions, such as figuring out how to close technology gaps between state and tribal law enforcement agencies, Everest said. She said Sen. Jessica Garvin, R-Duncan, had suggested the interim study. Garvin sits on the task force but did not attend Monday’s meeting, and her office did not return a message to discuss what she had planned. 

Rep. Ken Luttrell, R-Ponca City, who represents the House on the task force, said he believed an interim study would allow officials to dive deeper into the issues state and tribal law enforcement officers face. 

Luttrell, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, said he also believed tribal officials may be open to taking part in the hearings.

“I’m cautiously optimistic we would have more involvement in a forum like that than perhaps this task force had,” he said.

Why many tribal leaders refused to participate in Gov. Kevin Stitt's task force

Stitt created the task force in December after a flare-up between Okmulgee County jailers and Muscogee Nation Lighthorse Police officers. He said the incident highlighted the “broken system” created by McGirt v. Oklahoma, the landmark Supreme Court ruling that has led to the recognition of nine tribal reservations in the eastern part of Oklahoma. State courts lack the power to prosecute Native Americans on reservations. Those cases go to tribal or federal courts instead.

Stitt reserved two chairs on the new task force for tribal officials. But leaders of the five largest tribes affected by the McGirt ruling — the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee and Seminole nations — formally refused to participate. They cited Stitt’s framing of the task force’s mission and the lack of seats the governor assigned to tribal nations. Oklahoma is home to 38 federally recognized tribal nations.

At the start of Monday’s meeting, Everest noted that the two seats assigned to tribal nations remained empty. She said later that although tribal officials weren’t present at the meetings, she and other task force members have talked one-on-one with tribal leaders in recent weeks.

Stitt charged the task force with recommending legal and policy changes to address the “negative effects” of McGirt. He also ordered the task force to craft uniform working agreements that would cover state and tribal police and jails. The task force did discuss the possibility of creating a new umbrella agreement that state and tribal law enforcement agencies could use. But the task force scaled back that idea at the advice of Deputy Attorney General Justin Wolf, according to minutes from the group’s April meeting. The task force is now working instead on a “blueprint” of items to attach to agreements that already exist.

Everest said the ultimate goal is to make everyone safer by streamlining how agencies work together on tribal reservations.

“The amount of time that someone’s on the side of the road is dangerous for every law enforcement (officer) and every member of the public, and it’s not a time to have jurisdictional issues,” she said. “Equally, when you’re bringing someone in to county jail, or to a new jail, that is not the time.”

At one point during the meeting, Everest asked how the Okmulgee County jail dispute could have “ideally” been different. The December altercation between county jailers and Lighthorse police started after the latter officers tried to drop off a non-Native man they had arrested on drug charges. Jail staffers initially refused to book the man.

Cherokee County Sheriff Jason Chennault offered a short answer to Everest’s question on how the situation could have gone differently. “Well, by everybody getting along,” he said.

More: Oklahoma AG challenges Muscogee Nation's case against county jailer over dispute caught on video

Everest asked task force members to weigh in for a final time about issues they would like to see covered in the report. 

Oklahoma Department of Public Safety Commissioner Tim Tipton was perhaps the most direct when it was his turn to respond. He said he wanted to address the loss of fees and fines once collected by state law enforcement agencies that now go to tribal law enforcement agencies instead. 

Many cities have struck agreements with tribes so they are eventually reimbursed for traffic tickets their officers write to Native American drivers, but no such agreement exists at the state level. 

Tipton said he also would like to see guidance on how state officers can enforce the law uniformly when tribal laws can vary. 

“So, clarity of law is what my hope is,” he said, “which goes hand in hand with officer safety.”

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Defueling Plan and Closure of the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility

Upcoming events, open house: navy closure task force-red hill.

  • May 15 - 15, 2024
  • Honolulu HI

State of Hawai'i Emergency Order

  • Decision to Permanently Shut Down Red Hill

Facility Assessment Report

  • Hawai'i DOH Disapproval Decision

EPA Comments on the Defueling Plan

  • EPA Fact Sheet on the Defueling Plan

EPA Quality Validation Report Approvals

Interim defueling completion inspections, unpacking fuel lines, closure plan, department of defense joint task force-red hill.

Free viewers and readers are available to read and print documents posted on our website. If you experience a problem reading a document with assistive technology, please contact us .

Following the November 2021 contamination of Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam’s drinking water system, the Hawai'i State Department of Health (DOH) issued an emergency order to the U.S. Navy that required the Navy to cease all operations at the facility and defuel the 18 operational underground fuel storage tanks. The Hawai'i State Emergency Order was issued on December 6, 2021 and then was reissued on May 6, 2022.

  • December 6, 2021 Hawai'i DOH Emergency Order (pdf) and Press Release
  • May 6, 2022 Hawai'i DOH Emergency Order (pdf) and Press Release

Decision to Permanently Shut Down the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility

On March 7, 2022, U.S. Secretary of Defense, Lloyd J. Austin III, directed the Department of Defense to defuel and permanently shut down the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility. View Secretary Austin’s memorandum .

Defueling Plan

Under the Hawai'i DOH May 6, 2022 Emergency Order, the US. Navy was ordered to submit to DOH a report developed by an independent third-party contractor that evaluated deficiencies in infrastructure and operations at the Red Hill facility. Also under the Hawai'i DOH Emergency Order, the U. S. Navy was ordered to submit to DOH a phased plan for defueling the Red Hill facility no later than June 30, 2022.

On June 30, 2022, the Secretary of the Navy in coordination with the Defense Logistics Agency issued a defueling plan on behalf of the Department of Defense. The plan provides interim milestones to be achieved throughout the defueling process and shares an initial timeline for defueling the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage facility. This plan was submitted to the Hawai'i Department of Health (DOH) on June 30, 2022, to fulfill the requirements in Directive 4 of the DOH May 6, 2022 superseding Emergency Order (EO).

On September 7 and 28, 2022, The Navy submitted Defueling Plan Supplemental 1A and Supplemental 1B respectively to respond to EPA and DOH comments and provide additional information.

To view the defueling plan and supplemental documents, please visit the Department of Defense Defueling Plan, Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility page.

The Hawai’i Department of Health (DOH) Emergency Order ordered the Navy to contract a qualified independent third party to assess the operations and system integrity of the Red Hill facility to safely defuel the Bulk Fuel Storage Tanks. Navy contracted the firm Simpson Gumpertz & Herger Inc. and their subcontractor RiskTec to conduct the required facility assessment. Below are key documents resulting from the assessment:

  • Third Party Final Assessment Report (pdf) (April 29, 2022) Third Party Final Assessment Report of the Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Facility, Pearl Harbor, Hawai’i. Prepared by Simpson Gumpertz & Herger.
  • Third Party Assessment Final Presentation (Redacted) (pdf) (10 MB, April 26, 2022) April 26, 2022 presentation delivered to Navy at the conclusion of the Red Hill Facility Assessment Report. Presentation summarizes the conclusions within the final report. Prepared by Simpson Gumpertz & Herger (SGH), Risktec.
  • Workplan Memo: Red Hill Underground Fuel Storage Independent Assessment (pdf) (402 KB, February 1, 2022) Workplan describes the work conducted by Simpson Gumpertz & Herger to assess the facility operations and system integrity to safely defuel the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Tanks.

Hawai'i Department of Health Disapproval Decision

On July 22, 2022, the Hawai'i Department of Health disapproved the U.S. Department of Defense’s (DOD) Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility defueling plan, citing a lack of detail. DOH set a September 7, 2022 deadline for the Navy to resubmit its detailed defueling plan.

  • Hawai'i DOH Press Release on the Disapproval Decision
  • DOH Defuel Plan Disapproval letter and Comments (pdf)

Listed below are comments EPA has sent to the Navy regarding defueling.

  • EPA Email to Joint Task Force Red Hill: Supplement 3 of the RHBFSF Defueling Plan – No Further Comments (pdf) (161.6 KB, January 23, 2024) On January 23, 2024, EPA provided approval to the Joint Task Force-Red Hill of their Defueling Supplement 3.
  • Approval of RHBFSF Defueling Preparedness Report (pdf) (239.8 KB, October 3, 2023) On October 3, 2023, EPA provided approval to the Joint Task Force-Red Hill of their Defueling Preparedness Report. This approval gives Joint Task Force-Red Hill 15 days from the date of approval to begin defueling.
  • EPA and Hawaii DOH Comments on the Red Hill Groundwater Protection Plan Update (pdf) (481.6 KB, August 31, 2023) On August 31, 2023, EPA and Hawaii Department of Health sent Navy providing comments on their June 26, 2023 "Groundwater Protection Plan Update-Defueling Revision".
  • EPA's August 25, 2023 Comments on Supplement 2 of the RHBFSF Closure Plan; Response on Foundational Concepts for Closure (pdf) (360.2 KB, August 25, 2023) On August 25, 2023, EPA transmitted a comment letter to U.S. Navy Region Hawaii which addressed concepts related Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility closure in submittals received on May 31, 2023 and August 16, 2023.
  • EPA's June 16, 2023 Conditional Approval of the RHBFSF Defueling Plan and Response to Supplement 2 (pdf) (336.9 KB, June 16, 2023) On June 16, 2023, EPA provided conditional approval of Supplement 2 of the Joint Task Force-Red Hill's Defueling Plan. This letter provided comments and a summary of remaining actions to be taken prior to defueling.
  • EPA's June 28, 2023 Request for Analysis of Fuel in Tanks at Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility (pdf) (240 KB, June 28, 2023) On June 28, 2023, EPA requested additional information on fuel analysis performed by the Navy. This letter asks for certain sampling parameters to be further clarified, and for additional information on analytical methods used for sampling.
  • EPA's July 11, 2023 comments on Fitness-for Service Assessments of Repairs at RHBFSF (pdf) (248.1 KB, July 11, 2023) On July 11, 2023, EPA submitted a comment letter to the Joint Task Force-Red Hill (JTF) with comments requesting additional information on JTF’s Fitness-for-Service report. The comments made are so that EPA can unconditionally approve Quality Validation Reports for repairs/enhancements in preparation for defueling.
  • EPA's July 10, 2023 Conditional Approval of Surge Tank Drainage (pdf) (272.3 KB, July 10, 2023) On July 10, 2023, EPA provided conditional approval to allow Joint Task Force-Red Hill to begin draining surge tanks at the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility.
  • EPA's April 17, 2023 Comments on Integrated Master Schedules (pdf) (330.9 KB, April 17, 2023) On April 17, 2023, EPA transmitted to the Joint Task Force - Red Hill (JTF) feedback from the EPA on their Integrated Master Schedules (IMS). The comments highlight work, significant tasks, and milestones to be completed in the time leading up to defueling.
  • EPA’s August 11, 2022 Defueling Plan Comment Letter (REDACTED) (pdf) (365.4 KB, August 11, 2022) EPA's (REDACTED) response to the Navy's defueling plan for the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility (RHBFSF) submitted June 30, 2022. On August 11, 2022, EPA sent the Navy a comment letter that requests additional information be incorporated into the defueling plan to be submitted on September 7, 2022.

EPA Fact Sheet on the Defueling Plan

EPA provides updates to defueling activities at Red Hill and EPA's role. To view the defueling plan and supplemental documents, please visit: Department of Defense Defueling Plan, Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility .

  • EPA Fact Sheet: Defueling Activities and EPA’s Role at Red Hill (pdf) (326.6 KB, October 2023) EPA Fact Sheet with information about EPA’s role in the defueling activities at the U.S. Navy’s Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility near Honolulu, Hawai’i.

Listed below are letters EPA has sent to the Navy regarding Quality Validation Reports.

  • EPA Conditional Approval: August (II) and select July (III) RHBFSF Repair Quality Validation Reports (pdf) (274 KB, August 17, 2023) On August 17, 2023, EPA provided conditional approval of quality validation reports submitted by Joint Task Force - Red Hill. This letter includes July2023 and August 2023 submittals.
  • EPA Quality Validation Approvals for Repacking at Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility (pdf) (230.1 KB, August 11, 2023) On August 11, 2023 EPA provided a comment letter to JTF-Red Hill requesting additional information on the repacking process.
  • EPA Conditional Approval: June (I, II) and July (I-IV) RHBFSF Repair Quality Validation Reports; Fitness-for-Service Acceptance (pdf) (285 KB, August 9, 2023) On August 9, 2023, EPA provided conditional approval of quality validation report packets submitted by Joint Task Force - Red Hill. This letter included June 2023 and July 2023 submittals.
  • EPA Conditional Approval: Fitness-for-Service Clarification and Approval of RHBFSF Repair/Enhancement Quality Validation Reports -June (I) Packets (pdf) (272.9 KB, July 21, 2023) On July 21, 2023, EPA provided conditional approval of quality validation report packets submitted by Joint Task Force - Red Hill. This letter included April 2023, May 2023, and June 2023 submittals.
  • EPA Conditional Approval: Conditional Approval of RHBFSF Repair/Enhancement Quality Validation Reports - February and March Packets (pdf) (208.5 KB, July 10, 2023) On July 10, 2023, EPA provided conditional approval of two quality validation report packets submitted by Joint Task Force - Red Hill. This letter included February 2023 and March 2023 submittals.

Between March 5 and March 8, 2024, EPA conducted an Interim Defueling Completion Inspection of Red Hill to evaluate the status of the remaining fuel in the facility as reported by JTF-RH.

EPA sent a letter determination on March 21, 2024 to JTF-RH that they had met all eleven exit criteria listed in Defueling Plan Supplement 3. EPA is currently working to finalize the Inspection Report.

  • EPA Letter to Joint Task Force-Red Hill: Interim Defueling Inspection Preliminary RFI (pdf) (228.2 KB, March 18, 2024)
  • EPA Letter to Joint Task Force -Red Hill: Exit Criteria Complete (pdf) (196.1 KB, March 21, 2024)

The Navy will drain, or “unpack,” almost three miles of fuel facility pipelines linking the Red Hill facility fuel tanks to Pearl Harbor over several days starting October 25, 2022. Fuel will only be removed from the piping; no fuel will be moved from any of the 20 underground Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Tanks. Unpacking the fuel lines is a required action before the Navy can implement repairs needed to safely defuel all fuel from the Red Hill facility.

The Navy submitted its unpacking plan to EPA and DOH within the Navy’s September 7, 2022 Defuel Plan Supplemental 1A . EPA and DOH submitted comments on the Navy’s unpacking plan to request additional information.

  • EPA September 21, 2022 Comment Letter on Navy's Unpacking Plan (pdf) (341.3 KB, September 21, 2022) This enclosure contains EPA’s comments and requests for clarification on the Navy’s Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility Pipeline Unpacking Plan submitted to EPA on September 7, 2022.
  • Navy Response to September 21, 2022 EPA Comment Letter (pdf) (222.1 KB, September 28, 2022) This enclosure contains the DoD’s response to the September 21, 2022, EPA comments on the Unpacking Plan submitted by the Navy on September 7, 2022.
  • Hawaiʻi DOH Conditional Approval of Unpacking Plan This DOH press release contains a link to the DOH conditional approval letter document.

In preparation for unpacking the fuel lines, the Navy conducted an oil spill response exercise on September 22, 2022. EPA, DOH, and the US Coast Guard reviewed the Navy’s Unpacking Spill Exercise Plan (PDF) and observed Navy’s performance in conducting an effective spill response exercise. EPA concluded that the Navy met all the requirements of the exercise in a timely manner and provided feedback during and after the event.

The U.S. Navy submitted the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility Closure Plan to EPA and DOH on November 1, 2022. The plan documents can be accessed on the Joint Task Force Red-Hill webpage .

For updates on Department of Defense (DOD) efforts to defuel Red Hill, visit their Joint Task Force-Red Hill site.

  • Red Hill Home
  • About Red Hill
  • Defueling Plan and Closure of the Red Hill Facility
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  • 2023 Consent Order
  • 2015 Administrative Order on Consent (AOC)
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interim task force

Digitisation Taskforce

The Digitisation Taskforce, chaired by Sir Douglas Flint, was launched by the Chancellor on 19 July 2022 to drive forward the modernisation of the UK’s shareholding framework.

Digitisation Taskforce – Terms of Reference

Digitisation taskforce interim report.

PDF , 1.15 MB , 26 pages

This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.

July 2023: Interim report

On 10 July, the Digitisation Taskforce published an interim report setting out a number of potential recommendations and questions for industry to consider.

Sir Douglas will be conducting a period of open engagement over the next six months, ahead of delivering the final report to government. Feedback on the interim report should be sent to [email protected] by 25 September.

July 2022: Digitisation Taskforce

Mark Austin published the outcome of his review of Secondary Capital Raising in the UK on 19 July 2022, making a series of recommendations to the Government, Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) and the Pre-Emption Group (PEG). Modernising the UK’s shareholding framework was an important element of his review, as reform here would enhance the efficiency of capital markets, ensure investors are able to properly exercise their rights, and support innovation in UK capital markets. As outlined in Mr Austin’s report, digitisation encompasses reforming the UK’s shareholding framework and completing the elimination of paper share certificates.

On 19 July, the Government accepted Mark’s recommendation to establish a taskforce to modernise the UK’s shareholding framework, and appointed Sir Douglas Flint as chair of the Digitisation Taskforce. Sir Douglas is Chairman of Abrdn PLC and previously Group Chairman of HSBC.

The Taskforce, under the chairmanship of Sir Douglas, has been asked to a work with stakeholders across the financial services sector to build a broad consensus for change. In particular he has been asked to:

  • Identify immediate and longer term means of improving on the current intermediated system of share ownership;
  • Eliminate the use of paper share certificates for traded companies and mandate the use of additional options to cheques for cash remittances; and
  • Consider whether the arrangements for digitisation can be extended to newly formed private companies and as an optional route for existing UK private companies.

The Taskforce will also consider the use of new processes and technologies in achieving these goals.

The Taskforce will develop a timetable and plan for implementation of changes, and support progress. It will engage with the Government and regulators on progress, and advise on any legislative, regulatory or other changes required to support the programme.

The Chancellor has asked Sir Douglas to provide a public report on the Taskforce’s progress and initial findings by spring 2023, and to publish final recommendations and an implementation plan by spring 2024.

Interim report added

First published.

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Air Force instructor pilot dies after ejection seat accident

interim task force

Editor’s note: This story was updated May 14 6:53 p.m. Eastern Time with additional information, including the pilot’s name.

A U.S. Air Force instructor pilot died from his injuries after his plane’s ejection seat activated while on the ground Monday at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas.

Capt. John Robertson of the 80th Operations Support Squadron died early Tuesday morning after being severely injured when the ejection seat of the T-6A Texan II aircraft he was sitting in activated during ground operations, the base said in a Tuesday release.

“This is a devastating loss for Captain Robertson’s family and loved ones, and for the entire 80th Flying Training Wing,” Col. Mitchell Cok, the acting wing commander, said in the release. “Captain Robertson was a highly valued airman and instructor pilot. Our deepest condolences go with all who knew and loved him.”

“We are thankful for the M1 maintenance team who immediately provided live-sustaining care, and for the heroic efforts of the security forces, fire and medical personnel here on base and at United Regional Hospital,” Cok added. “Their efforts allowed time for Captain Robertson’s family to be at his side when he passed.”

A student who was also sitting in the plane did not eject and was not injured, Sheppard spokesperson George Woodward told Air Force Times Tuesday.

interim task force

Preparing for Russia: Inside NATO fighter pilot training in Texas

More than 8,000 nato aviators have earned their wings in wichita falls, texas, since the euro-nato joint jet pilot training (enjjpt) program began in 1981..

The service has not confirmed whether the aircraft was moving at the time of the accident, Woodward added.

An interim safety board investigation was convened immediately following the incident, and a full Air Force safety investigation board is expected to be in place later this week, according to Tuesday’s release. The board will release its report when the investigation is complete.

The 80th Flying Training Wing is home to the Euro-NATO Joint Jet Pilot Training Program, a key educational pipeline that has supplied new combat pilots to the transatlantic alliance for over 40 years.

The wing has trained more than half of all U.S. Air Force fighter pilots, as well as aviators hailing from Canada, Denmark, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Romania, Spain, Turkey and the United Kingdom.

The joint program has churned out more than 8,000 pilots since it began in 1981 — a mission that has taken on new urgency as NATO bolsters its defenses amid Russia’s invasion of Ukraine.

The Air Force did not answer Tuesday whether it plans to pause operations to inspect ejection seats across its fleet of nearly 450 T-6 planes, a move that could further slow graduations in the service’s already-struggling pilot training enterprise .

The two-seat, turboprop Texan IIs are used to teach basic flying skills to new Air Force and Navy pilots before they progress to more advanced airframes.

“The interim investigation board is in direct contact with 19th Air Force and [Air Education and Training Command] leadership,” Woodward said. “Any decisions regarding fleet-wide operations will be made by the AETC commander.”

This week’s fatality comes almost two years after the military grounded hundreds of training aircraft and other airframes amid concerns that their ejection seats would not fire correctly when needed.

Martin-Baker — which builds the ejection seats used on the T-6, F-35 Joint Strike Fighter and more — had discovered defects in some of the cartridges that explode to propel an aviator out of the cockpit.

It’s unclear whether the latest accident is related to those troubles. Martin-Baker did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Major accidents in the T-6 are rare; this week’s fatality marks the Air Force’s first death in a Texan II since 2004 , according to the Air Force Safety Center. The most recent accident that destroyed an Air Force T-6 occurred in 2019 .

The pilot is the ninth airman killed in an aviation-related mishap so far in fiscal year 2024.

This story was updated May 15 at 10:50 a.m. ET to clarify that the fatality is the Air Force’s first death in a T-6 since 2004.

Rachel Cohen is the editor of Air Force Times. She joined the publication as its senior reporter in March 2021. Her work has appeared in the Washington Post, the Frederick News-Post (Md.), Air and Space Forces Magazine, Inside Defense, Inside Health Policy and elsewhere.

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COMMENTS

  1. The California Reparations Report

    On June 29, 2023, the Task Force to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans issued its final report to the California Legislature. The final report surveys the ongoing and compounding harms experienced by African Americans as a result of slavery and its lingering effects on American society today, and proposes a comprehensive reparations plan in satisfaction of the ...

  2. Hotel Task Force

    HSS Task Force Professional Staffing services offers hotels, resorts, and management companies a resource to secure interim talent. Our Task Force professionals are seasoned and experienced, and will hit the ground running. Because HSS is the largest supplier of hospitality staffing across the U.S., we have access to a large pool of talent to ...

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  4. California Reparations Task Force Releases Interim Report Detailing

    The interim report builds on months of public hearings, hours of expert, public, and witness testimony, and numerous records submitted to the task force. In the interim report released today, the Reparations Task Force — over the course of 13 chapters — provides an accounting of many of the harms of slavery and systemic discrimination in ...

  5. Summary of the Interim Report

    On June 1, 2022, the California Task Force to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African Americans released its Interim Report providing an in-depth overview of the cumulative, cascading, and continuing harms inflicted on African Americans resulting from 246 years of enslavement, 90 years of Jim Crow, and decades more of systemic discrimination.

  6. California reparations report details 150 years of anti-Black harm

    The interim report, produced by the civil rights arm of the California Department of Justice with input from the task force, includes testimony from experts and public meetings of the task force ...

  7. AB 3121: Task Force to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for

    Additionally, the Task Force will recommend appropriate remedies of compensation, rehabilitation, and restitution for African Americans, with a special consideration for descendants of persons enslaved in the United States. By statute, the Task Force will issue a report to the Legislature by June 1, 2022, which will be available to the public. ...

  8. California issued its first in-depth report detailing how the ...

    In a 500-page interim report, the California Reparations Task Force detailed California's involvement in slavery and how it continues to negatively impact Black Americans. The nine-member panel ...

  9. PDF Inte Rim Report Of

    Interim Report of the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing 1 The task force was given 90 days to conduct hearings, review the research, and make recommendations to the President, so its focus was sharp and necessarily limited.

  10. Presidential Task Force on Combating Antisemitism

    The task force may produce interim recommendations shortly after the conclusion of this listening period. Upon completing its work, the task force will issue a final report with its findings and recommendations. Updates on the task force's progress will be posted on this page.

  11. PDF President's Identity Theft Task Force Summary of Interim Recommendations

    Federal agencies need guidance in how to make these important decisions. Recommendation 1: The Task Force recommends that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issue the attached guidance memorandum, advising federal agencies on steps to take in the event of a compromise of data. The Task Force has developed and formally approved a set of ...

  12. Executive Order on the Establishment of Interagency Task Force on the

    (ii) interim progress reports every 60 days thereafter; ... The Task Force shall coordinate, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law, with relevant stakeholders, including domestic and ...

  13. UNIFIL

    United Nations Interim Force In Lebanon. Meeting mayors and religious authorities from seven municipalities of south-eastern Lebanon yesterday, UNIFIL Head of Mission and Force Commander Lieutenant General Aroldo Lázaro thanked attendees for their continued support for peacekeepers and reassured them of the mission's continued assistanc

  14. PDF Interim Progress Report

    The Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families (Task Force) submits this interim report on recent progress of the implementation of Executive Order 14011 (E.O. 14011), Establishment of Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families.1 As of July 14, 2022, the Task Force has facilitated the reunification of 365 children with ...

  15. New interim DOD guidance 'delves into the risks' of generative AI

    Pentagon leadership recently issued new interim guidance to advise all U.S. defense and military components' ongoing and forthcoming adoption of emerging and disruptive generative artificial intelligence (Gen AI) technologies, sources told DefenseScoop. In August, senior defense officials launched Task Force Lima within the Chief Digital and ...

  16. PDF Interim Progress Report

    Task Force to provide them with reunification support and services. As a result, of these targeted efforts, the Task Force saw an increase of 55 percent in registrations in comparison to the weekly average since January 1, 2023. The Task Force remains committed to locating and informing eligible families about the option to reunify.

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  18. PDF Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families Interim

    The Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families (Task Force) submits this interim report on recent progress of the implementation of Executive Order 14011 (E.O. 14011), Establishment of Interagency Task Force on the Reunification of Families.1 As of September 14, 2022, the Task Force has facilitated the reunification of 487 children ...

  19. Review of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force Program

    The U.S. Justice Department's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) presents to the Attorney General its interim report on work of the Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) task forces, as mandated by the Providing Resources, Officers, and Technology to Eradicate Cyber Threats to Our Children (PROTECT) Act of 2008.

  20. Affordable Housing Task Force

    The task force must issue a report with recommendations to the General Assembly and the Governor on policies to create transformative change in the area of housing using federal coronavirus recovery money. ... Interim Committee Interim Committee Affordable Housing Task Force View By Session. Subject: Housing. The task force must issue a report ...

  21. Inside Task Force Lima's exploration of 180-plus generative AI use

    Task Force Lima continues to gain momentum across a variety of pursuits in its ambitious, 18-month plan to ensure the Pentagon can responsibly adopt, implement and secure powerful, still-maturing generative artificial intelligence technologies. ... The task force drafted that interim LLM guidance, but due to its classification level it has not ...

  22. Task Force Report on Expanding U.S.-India Partnerships

    In response to an earlier recommendation made by the Task Force in its interim report, AAU and the Council of Indian Institutes of Technology, the governing body responsible for all of the Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs), signed a memorandum of understanding in September 2023 that commits both parties to "promote and seek support for the design and establishment of the Indo-U.S ...

  23. PDF TERMS OF REFERENCE Interim Task Forces (ITFs)

    Importantly, the meeting also generated the proposal to establish three interim task forces to provide technical guidance for the establishment and operation of the Network, namely: 1. ITF 1 on Set-up and Operations of the GlobE Network - to discuss membership, nomination, governance, and other operational issues; 2.

  24. PDF 2022

    This interim report is a general survey of these harms, as part of the broader efforts of California's Task Force to Study and Develop Reparations Proposals for African Americans (Reparations Task Force) . The Reparations Task Force was established under Assembly Bill 3121 (S . Weber) in 2020 and a report of the Task Force is due to

  25. Oklahoma governor's reservation safety task force is wrapping up. Here

    Stitt reserved two chairs on the new task force for tribal officials. But leaders of the five largest tribes affected by the McGirt ruling — the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee and Seminole nations — formally refused to participate. They cited Stitt's framing of the task force's mission and the lack of seats the governor assigned to tribal nations.

  26. Defueling Plan and Closure of the Red Hill Bulk Fuel Storage Facility

    EPA Letter to Joint Task Force-Red Hill: Interim Defueling Inspection Preliminary RFI (pdf) (228.2 KB, March 18, 2024) EPA Letter to Joint Task Force -Red Hill: Exit Criteria Complete (pdf) (196.1 KB, March 21, 2024) Unpacking Fuel Lines. The Navy will drain, or "unpack," almost three miles of fuel facility pipelines linking the Red Hill ...

  27. Lawmakers to examine AI, Medicaid costs and more over interim

    One is the State and Local Tax Review Task Force, which lawmakers hope to use to overhaul or even ditch some taxes. It's charged with examining the state's near- and long-term financial ...

  28. Digitisation Taskforce

    July 2023: Interim report. On 10 July, the Digitisation Taskforce published an interim report setting out a number of potential recommendations and questions for industry to consider.

  29. Air Force instructor pilot dies after ejection seat accident

    A T-6A Texan II waits to taxi onto the runway Nov. 1, 2017, at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas. (Christopher Carranza/Air Force) Editor's note: This story was updated May 14 6:53 p.m. Eastern ...

  30. Artificial Intelligence Impact Task Force

    Colorado legislature email addresses ending in @state.co.us are no longer active.Please replace @state.co.us with @coleg.gov for Colorado legislature email addresses. Details The effective date for bills enacted without a safety clause is August 7, 2024, if the General Assembly adjourns sine die on May 8, 2024, unless otherwise specified.