28 Mental Health Games, Activities & Worksheets (& PDF)

28 Mental Health Activities, Worksheets & Books for Adults & Students

Despite this, increasing mental health awareness is crucial as it can have many positive outcomes.

For example, one study examining a British anti-stigma campaign found that people who were more familiar with the campaign were more likely to feel comfortable disclosing mental health issues to family, friends, or an employer, and were also more likely to seek professional help (Henderson et al., 2017).

Fortunately, there are all sorts of ways to learn about mental health issues, whether one is an introvert, an extrovert, or somewhere in between.

This article will cover tools that can supplement mental health interventions, worksheets and activities that help people learn about mental health, books dealing with mental health for adults and children, Facebook groups for mental health issues, and finally World Mental Health Day activities and events.

Before you read on, we thought you might like to download our three Positive Psychology Exercises for free . These science-based exercises will explore fundamental aspects of positive psychology including strengths, values and self-compassion and will give you the tools to enhance the mental health of your clients, students or employees.

This Article Contains:

5 tools for mental health interventions.

  • 5 Mental Health Worksheets & Awareness Activities (PDF)

5 Most Popular Books About Mental Health

  • 5 Most Popular Children’s Books About Mental Health

Facebook Groups for Mental Health

World mental health day ideas for schools and workplaces, a take-home message.

Here are some tools that will help a psychotherapy treatment plan go more smoothly for both the client and the clinician:

1. Thought Record Worksheet

This PDF is a way to record one’s thoughts and reflect on them. It asks the user to log their emotions and thoughts as well as what was going on to make them feel that way, then has the user reflect on whether or not there is evidence to back up their automatic thoughts. This could be a valuable supplement to a psychotherapist-led CBT treatment, but could also help people teach themselves about CBT .

In fact, one study has shown that thought records are an effective way to modify beliefs, even when used by themselves and not in conjunction with a CBT treatment plan (McManus et al., 2012). Find the Thought Record Worksheet here.

2. The Feeling Wheel

The Feeling Wheel is a simple printout with 72 feelings sorted into 6 groups: angry, sad, scared, joyful, peaceful, and powerful. Represented as a colorful pie, it can be an excellent tool for psychotherapy clients who have difficulty articulating or expressing their feelings.

While this can make it easier for clients to describe their relationships and experiences outside of therapy, it can also help them give immediate feedback on how they feel during a session.

This technique is commonly used to help clients identify emotions, expand their emotional vocabulary, and develop their emotional regulation (Kircanski et al., 2012).

3. Daily Mood Tracker

This Daily Mood Tracker was developed for people dealing with anger management issues but can be helpful for anyone who wants to track their mood.

It splits the day up into several two-hour blocks and asks the user to track their emotions, as well as allowing for notes to explain these moods.

This can also be helpful for clients who have trouble expressing themselves but can provide valuable self-reflection opportunities for anybody. Interestingly, some research has even shown that depressed clients can improve their mood by tracking it (Harmon et al., 1980).

4. Self-Care Checkup

This worksheet is a self-report Self-Care Checkup that therapists can give their clients after each appointment, to fill in between the sessions. The client is meant to consider the activities they are engaging in to keep up good mental health and wellbeing.

While many could be considered routine, such as exercising or getting sufficient sleep, they can often be neglected when they matter most – during times of stress.

This way, the Self-Care Checkup invites clients to become more aware of the frequency with which they practice self-care, categorizing these activities into five groups:

  • Professional; and
  • Spiritual self-care.

By filling it out regularly, clients can compare their self-care practices from week to week, spotting areas for development and brainstorming more activities that might help them maintain their mental health.

5. Preventing Mental Health Relapse

This is a worksheet that can help clients learn more about possible mental health relapse. It can be used near the end of a therapy treatment plan to help the client recognize a relapse when it is coming, but can also teach strategies to avoid relapse.

This would likely be most helpful for mental health issues that flare up at specific times (as opposed to more chronic mental health issues), and can also be helpful during treatment changes.

For example, patients with anxiety disorders receiving both psychotherapy and antidepressants are at risk of relapse when they discontinue their antidepressant treatment (Batelaan et al., 2017).

Download and use this Preventing Mental Health Relapse activity here.

5 Mental Health Games & Awareness Activities (PDF)

5 Mental Health Worksheets & Awareness Activities (PDF)

One way to get around this is to have them complete worksheets or participate in activities related to mental health awareness, so they can learn in a more hands-on way.

These worksheets and activities are excellent for cultivating mental health awareness:

1. Mindfulness Exercises For Children

This article includes a huge collection of easy mindfulness exercises that children can do to learn more about mindfulness. It includes activities for teachers, parents, caregivers, and teenagers, along with a host of meditation scripts, books, quotes, and more.

Check out the following, too, for some great ways to get children thinking about mindfulness, while subtly introducing them to mental health issues more broadly: 18 Mindfulness Games, Worksheets and Activities for Kids .

2. Mental Illness: Myths and Reality

Mental Illness – Myths and Reality is a helpful lesson plan for teachers who want to educate students about mental illness stigma.

This activity requires less than 30 minutes and very little preparation – it’s also great for any class size and can be a useful talking point to start insightful discussions around mental health.

It includes 8 myths and 8 facts about mental illness for students to sort out in pairs, to distinguish between common misconceptions and objective facts about diagnosis and life with a mental health condition.

3. Exercise and Mental Health

Exercise and Mental Health  introduces younger children to the importance of exercise and physical activity, illustrating how they go hand-in-hand before giving suggestions for students who want to get more active on a daily basis.

This informational resource is a great handout as part of a lesson about mental health.

4. Understanding Mental Health Stigma

Introducing youths to the concept of stigma can be quite tough, but it’s important.

This Understanding Mental Health Stigma sheet can be used as an aid to help raise awareness of the stigma that surrounds mental illness , as well as what it looks like.

5. Mental Health Management Bingo

Mental Health Management Bingo  is a fun classroom game that can be played with slightly older students.

While it aims to raise awareness about the importance of positive coping strategies, it can also be a great way for students to bond with one another and discover new, healthy ways to look after their mental health..

To play, students require a copy of each sheet and a pencil, and each Bingo square worksheet contains 22 positive coping mechanisms that are related to maintaining good mental health. It’s easy for students to play, and just as easy for teachers or parents to join in!

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We suggest picking at least one of these popular to broaden your understanding of mental health.

1. Mental Health Emergencies: A Guide to Recognizing and Handling Mental Health Crises – Nick Benas and Michele Hart

Mental Health Emergencies

Written by a mental health associate and a social worker, this book aims to help people recognize mental health crises in the people around them.

This book also aims to teach the reader how to support people in the midst of a mental health crisis.

The authors targeted this book to teachers, human resources workers and other professionals who are concerned with the mental wellbeing of other people, but it can be helpful for anyone who wishes to know more about mental health.

Find the book on Amazon .

2. Ten Days in a Mad-House – Nellie Bly

Ten Days in a Mad-House

This book details investigative reporter Nellie Bly’s exposé of a New York City insane asylum in the late 1800s.

In the book, the author details how she checked into a boarding house, feigned insanity and was promptly declared insane and sent to an insane asylum.

Bly spent 10 days in the asylum, during which she uncovered the horrific conditions that patients were subjected to, causing the city and the country to reevaluate how they treated the mentally ill.

This book illustrates how horribly mental health patients were treated in the late 1800s, but can also cause the reader to think about how society treats mental health issues today.

3. Stigma: The Many Faces Of Mental Illness – Joy Bruce M.D.

Stigma

This book, from a doctor with a mood disorder, aims to educate people about mental health issues and ultimately destigmatize mental health issues.

The book describes various mental health disorders and the nuances of them, making it a great educational book.

The author also discusses a wide variety of people with mental health issues, breaking down stereotypes about mental health along the way. This is a great book for someone who wants to understand more about mental health issues in themselves or others.

4. Look Me in the Eye: My Life with Asperger’s – John Elder Robison

Look Me in the Eye

This memoir discusses the author’s experience of living with Asperger’s syndrome.

The author was not diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome until he was 40 years old, so before then he just lived as someone who felt that he could not connect very well with others for some reason but displayed an affinity for machines and electronics.

This book is an excellent way to gain some insight into the world of Asperger’s syndrome and may help the reader better understand someone in their life who deals with Asperger’s syndrome.

5. Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat – Oliver Sacks and Jonathan Davis

Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat

This book from Oliver Sacks is a pop psychology classic. In it, Sacks discusses a few different cases of mental health disorders, focusing on the person rather than the disorder the whole way through.

This is an excellent book for learning about mental health disorders in a way that doesn’t necessarily otherize people with mental health issues. The book’s scope also makes it a great introduction to mental health disorders.

5 Most Popular Children’s Books About Mental Health

Nurturing an understanding of mental health from a young age can be done with these great reads.

1. Can I Catch It Like a Cold?: Coping With a Parent’s Depression – Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Joe Weissmann

Can I Catch It Like a Cold

This book from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Canada is aimed at children whose parents struggle with depression.

The book describes what depression is and is not, and gives the reader strategies to cope with the situation. It is aimed at children as young as five years old and can be a child’s first official introduction to mental health disorders.

2. Dear Allison : Explaining Mental Illness to Young Readers – Emma Northup Flinn

Dear Allison

This book discusses mental health in an adventurous, conversational way that can help children start to understand the subject.

Written from the perspective of the reader’s cousin (who has teamed up with an ant to explore mental health issues across parts of the United States), this is another excellent book for introducing children to mental health.

The book is partially a collection of letters from the narrator to her nine-year-old cousin, “Allison”, so this book is definitely appropriate for children as young as 9 to start learning about mental health.

3. Marvin’s Monster Diary: ADHD Attacks! (But I Rock It, Big Time) – Raun Melmed, Annette Sexton, and Jeff Harvey

Marvin's Monster Diary

This book is an excellent way to teach children as young as 7 years old about attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), particularly if they have it.

Aside from helping children understand ADHD, it offers a mindfulness-based solution the author calls ST4 – “Stop, Take Time To Think”.

This book is an excellent resource for children with ADHD to learn more about themselves and strategies they can use every day to focus.

4. How Full Is Your Bucket? For Kids – Tom Rath, Mary Reckmeyer, and Maurie J. Manning

How Full Is Your Bucket

This book was written by Tom Rath, an important author in positive psychology and particularly strengths finding (as he wrote StrengthsFinder 2.0).

It is a children’s adaptation of another one of his popular books, How Full Is Your Bucket?, which claims that people can either “fill your bucket” with positivity or “dip from your bucket” with negativity.

This is an excellent book to show kids how social interactions can affect their self-esteem and wellbeing, and how the way they treat people can affect the self-esteem and wellbeing of others.

5. Please Explain Anxiety to Me! Simple Biology and Solutions for Children and Parents – Laurie E. Zelinger, Jordan Zelinger, and Elisa Sabella

Please Explain Anxiety to Me

This book, co-authored by a play therapist and a child psychologist, aims to explain anxiety to children in a simplified but still accurate way.

This means describing the physiology of anxiety in a way that children as young as 5 can start to understand.

It also includes some actionable exercises that children can use when they are feeling anxious. This book can help children deal with their own anxiety and learn some concrete psychology along the way.

mental health activities kids

Sometimes, the best thing for someone struggling with mental health issues is the ability to reach out to someone who will understand them.

Facebook is great for this, as people can start community-based groups focused around mental health issues.

That said, as is always the case with the internet, anybody can contribute to these groups, which has the potential to be harmful to members of that group.

For that reason, we have only highlighted closed groups (as opposed to open groups), which require admin approval to join. This way, it is more likely that someone will find a group full of people who only want to help.

Someone looking for a Facebook group to discuss mental health should try joining one of these:

Adult ADHD/ADD Support Group… By Reach2Change

This is a support group for adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), or attention deficit disorder (ADD).

Anxiety/Depression Mental Health Support Group

This is a support group for people (18+) who struggle with depression or anxiety .

Bipolar Disorder

This is a support group for people with bipolar disorder, people who know someone with bipolar disorder, or people who want to learn more about bipolar disorder.

Mental Health Inspiration (Support & Awareness)

This is a support group for people with all sorts of mental health issues, as well as people who wish to be an ally or learn more about mental health.

PTSD Buddies

This is a support group for people (19+) with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

30 Minute relaxing yoga for mental health – Jessica Richburg

October 10th is World Mental Health Day.

The objective of this important day is to spread awareness about mental health issues, express thanks to mental health care providers, and do more to make mental health care a reality for those who need it. Overall, the day represents a valuable opportunity to start a dialog about mental health with others in your life.

If you’re a teacher, manager, or principal looking for ways to start this conversation in your school or workplace, here are four ideas to get started.

Yoga and pilates have both been shown to reduce a range of mental health symptoms, such as fatigue and feelings of anxiety, while simultaneously increasing feelings of energy (Fleming & Herring, 2018; Hagen & Nayar, 2014).

To leverage these benefits, consider bringing in a yoga or pilates expert (or linking up with a nearby studio) to do a guided class with your staff or students.

Host a charity event

There are many charitable organizations around the world that are working hard to provide mental health support to those who may otherwise not have access to it.

To help, you can work with your students or staff to identify a cause they feel passionate about and run an event to raise money for a worthy cause. For example, consider hosting a raffle, games evening, cake stall, or fete open to the public.

Wellness gift exchange

A simple gift can do a lot to start a conversation, so consider hosting a wellness gift exchange.

To start, randomly assign your students or staff a ‘gift buddy.’ If you like, you can make the identity of gift-givers and receivers anonymous, much like a Secret Santa, by having your staff or students draw names from a hat.

Next, allocate a spending limit and have each person purchase a gift for someone else. The focus of the gift should encourage the recipient to relax and take some time out for him or herself. Examples of good gifts include movie tickets, a pampering face mask, or a soap and candle gift basket.

Information sessions

Teaching children how to start a conversation with someone about mental health is a skill that can serve them for a lifetime. At the same time, the stigma associated with mental illness may act as a barrier for adults to start a conversation with someone they’re concerned about or seek help.

To help, consider bringing in a mental health speaker or expert and host an information session. The aim of the session should be to connect your students or staff to resources and give them the skills to check in with the mental health of those they care about.

Further, you can take this opportunity to remind your students or staff about internal support services in your school or office, such as forms of personal leave or internal counselors.

In addition to the ideas above, it is likely that public spaces around you, such as libraries and community centers, will have planned events around World Mental Health Day. So consider linking up with groups in your local community to support this important cause.

At the end of the day, nobody can know everything there is to know about mental health issues. The key is constantly being willing to learn, so that you know how to help when someone you love deals with mental health issues, and have the strategies to deal with your own mental health issues if and when they arise.

Some people prefer reading books, others prefer more hands-on learning such as worksheets, and still, others just prefer going out and talking to people. No matter what type of learning you prefer, the important thing is that you make an effort to make this world a better place for everyone, no matter what mental health issues they are or aren’t facing.

We hope you enjoyed reading this article. Don’t forget to download our three Positive Psychology Exercises for free .

  • Batelaan, N.M., Bosman, R.C., Muntingh, A., Scholten, W.D., Huijbregts, K.M., van Balkom, A.J.L.M. (2017). Risk of relapse after antidepressant discontinuation in anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis of relapse prevention trials. BMJ, 358(1) , j3927.
  • Fleming, K. M., & Herring, M. P. (2018). The effects of pilates on mental health outcomes: A meta-analysis of controlled trials. Complementary Therapies in Medicine , 37, 80-95.
  • Hagen, I., & Nayar, U. S. (2014). Yoga for children and young people’s mental health and well-being: research review and reflections on the mental health potentials of yoga. Frontiers in Psychiatry , 5.
  • Harmon, T.M., Nelson, R.O., Hayes, S.C. (1980). Self-monitoring of mood versus activity by depressed clients. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 48(1) , 30-38.
  • Henderson, C., Robinson, E., Evans-Lacko, S., Thornicroft, G. (2017). Relationships between anti-stigma programme awareness, disclosure comfort and intended help-seeking regarding a mental health problem. British Journal of Psychiatry, 211(5) , 316-322.
  • Kaduson, H.G., Schaefer, C.E. (Eds.). (2003). 101 favorite play therapy techniques. Volume III. Lanham, MA: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Kircanski, K., Lieberman, M. D., & Craske, M. G. (2012). Feelings into words: contributions of language to exposure therapy. Psychological Science, 23 (10), 1086.
  • Lambert, M.J. (2015). Progress Feedback and the OQ-System: The Past and the Future. Psychotherapy, 52(4) , 381-390.
  • McManus, F., Van Doorn, K., Yiend, J. (2012). Examining the effects of thought records and behavioral experiments in instigating belief change. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 43(1) , 540-547.

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3 Positive Psychology Tools (PDF)

Extracurricular activities for psychology students

Extracurricular activities can greatly enrich the educational experience of psychology students by providing practical application of theoretical knowledge, opportunities for personal growth, and avenues for networking and collaboration. Engaging in such extracurricular activities can complement academic studies and help psychology students develop a well-rounded skill set that will benefit them in their future careers. Let us explore some of these extracurricular activities for psychology students in more detail.

Join a psychology club

One of the most valuable extracurricular activities for psychology students is joining a psychology or mental health club. Many institutions provide psychology or mental health-focused student organizations where people with similar interests can connect. These groups frequently host guest lectures, workshops, and debates on a range of psychology-related subjects. Students who take part in these events may be exposed to various viewpoints, cutting-edge research, and real-world applications of psychological theory. Additionally, these clubs offer chances for networking with other students who have same interests, which may result in lifelong friendships and professional partnerships.

Volunteer at a mental health organization

For psychology students, working as a volunteer at a mental health organization is a fantastic extracurricular activity. Students can obtain practical experience and a deeper understanding of the difficulties experienced by people with mental health disorders by volunteering. There are several ways to get engaged, such as working in crisis hotlines, counseling clinics, or community mental health initiatives. Through volunteering, students can see how psychological concepts are used in practical settings, cultivate empathy and compassion, and improve their interpersonal skills. Additionally, it offers a chance to improve the lives of others and give back to the community.

The following shows examples of organizations students can volunteer at:

  • National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) provides education, support, and advocacy for individuals and families affected by mental health conditions. Local NAMI chapters often require volunteers for support groups and outreach programs.
  • Crisis Text Line offers 24/7 text-based crisis intervention services. Volunteers receive comprehensive training to provide support to individuals in crisis.
  • Mental Health America (MHA) focuses on advocacy, education, and support for mental health. MHA has local affiliates and chapters throughout the United States where you can inquire about volunteer opportunities.
  • American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) raises awareness about suicide prevention and provides support to those affected by suicide. AFSP seeks volunteers for events, outreach, and fundraising efforts.
  • Active Minds promotes mental health awareness and reduces stigma on college campuses. They have student-led chapters across the United States that offer volunteer opportunities.
  • Veterans’ Affairs Medical Centers provide mental health services to veterans. These centers often have volunteer programs to support veterans through recreational activities, companionship, or administrative tasks.

Engage in Psychology research

Engaging in research or working as a research assistant in a psychology lab is another valuable extracurricular activity for psychology student. It provides psychology students with practical experience in research methodology and data analysis. There are numerous universities with research facilities devoted to different areas of psychology, including cognitive psychology, developmental psychology, and clinical psychology. Psychology students can collaborate closely with professors and seasoned researchers by joining a lab, where they can learn about various research procedures and strategies. Students can hone their critical thinking abilities, learn how to plan, and carry out experiments, analyze data, and enhance their field’s body of knowledge by participating in research projects.

These extracurricular activities for psychology students can expect students to engage in experimental studies, surveys, observations, case studies, correlational research, longitudinal studies, or meta-analyses. In contrast to surveys, which collect information on attitudes and actions, experimental research allows for the investigation of cause-and-effect linkages. Case studies give in-depth research of particular people or groups, whereas observational studies offer insights into naturalistic behavior. Both longitudinal studies and correlational research examine relationships between variables over time. Meta-analyses combine previously published findings. When choosing a research topic, consider your interests, the resources at your disposal, and ethical issues. You should also speak with mentors to improve your research question and plan.

Participate in mentorship programs

For psychology students, taking part in peer counseling or mentorship programs can be a fulfilling extracurricular activity. Peer counseling programs, where students can help and advise their peers, are provided by several colleges. Students that take part develop their active listening, empathy, and communication skills while using psychological theories to support their friends as they deal with personal difficulties or academic stress. Such extracurricular activities for psychology students help foster a sense of community and mutual support among students. Furthermore, peer counseling can improve students’ social skills, self-confidence, and problem-solving ability.

Psychology mentorship programs on the other hand allows students to work with established mentors. Students in these programs benefit from the mentors’ expertise and the learning curve is steep. Mentors provide guidance on academic goals, career options, opportunities for research, networking with colleagues, and skill development. Additionally, they can help the mentee develop and achieve goals, manage obstacles, and give comments on their work.

Community outreach programs

Another extracurricular activity for psychology students is participating in community outreach projects that promote mental health awareness and education. With these initiatives, the stigma associated with mental illness will be lessened, and community wellbeing will be promoted. These extracurricular activities for psychology students include planning workshops on mental health, giving informative speeches, and volunteering at community mental health events. Students can hone their public speaking, leadership, and community engagement abilities while also improving the lives of others by participating in outreach initiatives.

Attend Psychology workshops

Attending conferences, workshops, and seminars is an excellent way for psychology students to stay updated with the latest research and trends in the field. Academic conferences provide opportunities to learn from experts, network with professionals, and gain insights into cutting-edge research. Students can attend presentations and panel discussions on a wide range of topics, and they may even have the opportunity to present their own research findings if applicable. These events can broaden students’ horizons, inspire new ideas, and foster connections with professionals in the field, which can be valuable for future career prospects or graduate studies.

Start a Psychology-related blog or podcast

Another creative extracurricular activity for psychology students is starting a psychology-related blog or podcast. This allows students to share their knowledge, insights, and research findings with a broader audience. By creating content on psychological topics, students can refine their communication skills, develop the ability to distill complex concepts into accessible language, and engage with a community of readers or listeners who are interested in psychology. Blogging or podcasting can also serve as a platform for students to express their creativity, demonstrate their expertise, and potentially contribute to public discourse on psychological issues.

Here are some popular examples of psychology blogs:

  • Psychology Today: https://www.psychologytoday.com/
  • BPS Research Digest: https://digest.bps.org.uk/
  • The Psychologist: https://thepsychologist.bps.org.uk/
  • PsyBlog: https://www.spring.org.uk/
  • The Science of Us: https://www.thecut.com/science-of-us/

Participate in public speaking clubs

Debate and public speaking groups can help psychology students develop crucial communication and critical thinking abilities. The exercises give students the chance to hone their persuasive and organized argumentation skills. Debating psychological theories or relevant ethical concerns can strengthen students’ critical thinking skills and aid in the development of a nuanced 0understanding of other viewpoints. Throughout their careers, the ability to speak in front of an audience will come in very handy when presenting research findings, making presentations, or participating in professional conversations.

In conclusion, engaging in extracurricular activities for psychology students can significantly enhance the educational journey of psychology students. Joining psychology or mental health clubs, volunteering at mental health organizations, conducting research or working in psychology labs, participating in peer counseling or mentoring programs, engaging in community outreach, attending conferences, starting a psychology-related blog or podcast, and joining debate or public speaking clubs are all valuable activities for psychology students.

These extracurricular activities for psychology students provide practical application of knowledge, foster personal growth, develop critical skills, and create opportunities for networking and collaboration. By actively participating in these extracurricular activities, psychology students can complement their academic studies and become well-rounded professionals in the field of psychology.

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Willamette’s Independent Student Newspaper since 1889:

Your College, Your Paper, Your Stories

  • Lee Parsons, Staff Writer
  • Dec 7, 2023

Inside the mind of Psychology Club: Building a welcoming atmosphere for all

psychology club activities

Every Thursday afternoon at Willamette University, a diverse group of students comes together to explore the intricacies of the human mind. The Psychology Club, led by president Sterlin Griffin (‘26), provides a unique space for individuals with varied goals and backgrounds all united by a shared interest in psychology.

According to Kayla Stinson (‘24), the vice president of the club, the beauty of the Psychology Club lies in the diversity of goals among its members. In Griffin’s words, his goal is to “foster a community of those who enjoy psychology,” regardless of whether or not they are officially studying psychology. Stinson supports this and said their goal is “mostly about sharing psychology and making psychology accessible to different people.” These distinct yet compatible goals contribute to the richness of the club's environment, creating a club that is accessible to all and enthusiastic about psychology and creating community. The club seeks to create a welcoming atmosphere, attempting to break down typical barriers present in the field and making psychology an engaging subject for all.

The weekly meetings are far from predictable, with activities ranging from psycho-analysis of fictional characters using the DSM-5 to exploring scientific articles and listening to guest speakers. Obtaining credible information is therefore crucial for the club. In the past, Griffin has reached out to faculty and explored reputable sources like the American Psychological Association (APA) for articles, and Stinson added articles that came from classes and faculty members. These articles help shape the club's discussions. 

As for guest speakers, the club strives to bring in knowledgeable individuals. Griffin said, “The people we try to get are always credited people. Currently, I’m trying to look into the side of neuroscience.” Griffin expressed an interest in featuring speakers from different scientific fields adjacent to psychology. The goal is to expose members to diverse perspectives within psychology, integrating speakers from both psychology and other fields.

The club has an emphasis on making activities accessible to everyone in the club. Stinson stressed the focus on discussion and words rather than physical actions, aligning with the club’s goal of bringing psychology to people, rather than people to the field. Underscoring the importance of making meetings and activities accessible, the Psychology Club’s activities do not require prior knowledge of any kind in the field. 

The club's structure reflects a desire to be open to everyone. As Stinson stated, “We don’t aim to make [the club] exclusive. … pretty much all of our emails come with the note, ‘Bring your friends if you want!’” This echoes their commitment to creating a welcoming environment for anyone interested, not just those directly involved in psychology. “In the future," Stinson said, "we want to expand [the club] to have more opportunities, but as a beginning stage, we’re really focusing on bringing it to other people at the moment.”

As part of this expansion, the club doesn't limit its impact to campus meetings and has begun to hold activities on other parts of campus. Griffin shared his experience with convocation courses and seminars on mental health, saying, “I had a seminar about mental health. I had the biology faculty, some people from Bishop and Kayla, the vice president, [were] there.” He added that the group is “open to the campus," highlighting the club's commitment to community engagement: "It’s a community thing. It’s always available, fall and spring, so it’s a good way to get connected.” The club aspires to organize events that appeal to both psychology enthusiasts and those unfamiliar with the field.

For future events, Griffin envisions volunteer work that will introduce psychology in a fun and engaging manner. Stinson added that collaboration with health sciences is a priority, intending to have the club collaborate with other organizations on special topics and events.

Griffin founded the Psychology Club in the spring and, despite being relatively new, the club has already attracted around 65 members to its email list. Their challenge lies in converting this interest into active participation. Currently, the introduction course for psychology takes place at the same time as the club, which creates a scheduling conflict for many first-year students. Due to this, the club is considering moving its weekly meeting time based on the availability of those interested next semester.

The Psychology Club at Willamette University stands as a community where psychology enthusiasts come together to explore, discuss and engage with the fascinating world of the mind. With a commitment to accessibility, community building and continuous improvement, the club is poised to leave a lasting impact on its members and the broader community. If students find themselves intrigued by the complexities of the human mind, Thursdays at 3:30 p.m. in Walton 140 might just be the perfect time and place for them. 

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Exciting Psychology Club Ideas for an Engaging Experience

Deborah c. escalante.

September 15, 2023

Exciting Psychology Club Ideas for an Engaging Experience

Are you looking for interesting ways to engage with psychology enthusiasts or students who are keen on learning the different areas of psychology? The best way of doing so is by starting your own psychology club. A club that meets regularly and discusses topics that interest them can foster a sense of community that brings like-minded individuals together. Here are some innovative and exciting psychology club ideas that can help you create a club that people look forward to attending.

Table of Contents

A Book Club

Reading books can be a great way to explore in-depth the various areas in psychology. A book club that reads and discusses psychology books can give you a deeper understanding of the subject and stimulate intellectual conversations with fellow members. You can choose between historical, theoretical, or contemporary psychology books based on interest.

Guest Speaker Series

Inviting speakers that belong to different areas of psychology is a great way to engage with the latest developments and research in psychology. You can get in touch with professors, researchers, or mental healthcare professionals and invite them to speak on their expertise, and conduct insightful Q&A sessions.

Group Discussions & Debates

A group discussion can help members learn from one another. A casual or structured forum where members can discuss important issues, share experiences, and debate the pros and cons of a particular position can foster critical thinking and communication skills.

Volunteer Work in a Mental Health Institution

Mental health is a crucial area in psychology. Members can volunteer at a mental health institution and attending support groups meetings to learn about mental health and gain hands-on experience. It can be an enlightening and fulfilling experience.

Field Trips

Field trips to places that relate to psychology like museums, exhibitions or historic psychological sites can provide members with an in-depth insight into the history, development, and growing importance of psychology in our society.

Professional Development Workshops

Conducting professional development workshops that encourage members to learn more about psychology-related skills like research, report writing, counseling, and communication, can prepare them for future career and learning opportunities. Workshops can be conducted by experienced psychologists, educators, and trainers.

Movie Screenings & Analysis

Screening psychological films followed by an analysis by members is a fun and easy way to explore elements of human behavior, emotions, and mental health. The group can discuss and debate the relevance of the themes and topics explored in the movie.

Collaborative Research Projects

Collaborating on research projects can provide a platform for members to conduct research on a topic of interest. The members can decide on research methodology, conduct surveys or Q&A’s, analyze data, and present findings. It can be an exciting opportunity to apply psychology knowledge and gain research experience.

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Psychology Club

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  • Discussing psychological topics (such as free will; effect of trauma on emotional development)
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OU Psychology Club

The University of Oklahoma Psychology Club's purpose is to encourage, stimulate, and maintain excellence in psychology and to facilitate and further knowledge in psychology among students. Psychology Club is a great way to meet other students and faculty in the department, learn about graduate school and career options, and learn about volunteer and internship opportunities. You will also be able to find out about research being conducted in the department and how to get involved.

Check out our instagram where we share updates about our events here . 

"Psi Chi is the National Honor Society in Psychology, founded in 1929 for the purposes of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship, and advancing the science of psychology. Membership is open to graduate and undergraduate men and women who are making the study of psychology one of their major interests" ( psichi.org ).

OU Psi Chi General Information:

Please contact Psychology Club Officers for membership application graduation gear deadlines.

The requirements for Psi Chi membership are as follows:

  • Completion of 3 semesters of college coursework
  • Completion of at least 9 semester hours (approx. 3 classes) of Psychology Coursework
  • Registration for a major or minor in Psychology
  • 3.00 GPA Overall
  • 3.00 GPA in Psychology Coursework
  • Ranking in the top 35% of one’s class in general scholarship
  • Receipt of $55 dues. (Dues are paid only once for lifetime membership. Dues MUST be submitted with application. Dues are refundable if you are not granted membership)

Interested in being part of a nationally recognized Honor Society for Psychology? You need to pick up an application for Psi Chi from the Psychology Club Officers and Return your application to them with your dues. DO NOT put applications or dues in our mailbox or in the bulletin board. Give the application to an officer in person!

Contact Information

Psychology Club Officers

President: L'eric Houston,  [email protected]

VP: Carson Freeman,  [email protected]

Secretary: Jade Rowland,  [email protected]

Public Relations: Delaney Fulp, [email protected]

Treasurer: Meagan Brittain,  [email protected]

Faculty Advisors: Dr. Erin Freeman, [email protected]   Dr. Carol Terry,  [email protected]

Graduate Liaison: Olivia Perrin, [email protected]

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Students are encouraged to join the Psychology Club, which sponsors speakers, field trips, service activities, and graduate school preparation sessions. The department also has a chapter of Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology.

Psychology Club

The Psychology Club is an organization for students who are interested in psychology. Membership is open to any student currently enrolled at IU Northwest.

The purpose of the organization is to provide opportunities for students to encounter experiences not possible in the classroom, and to encourage informal interaction between the students and the faculty. In addition, the organization hopes to provide the campus community, and the local community, with informal opportunities to learn about psychological topics.

These goals are accomplished through field trips, films, discussion groups, speakers, social gathering and articles posted on the Psychology Club Bulletin Board in Raintree Hall. For those students who are either pursuing psychology as a major or a minor, membership information on the American Psychological Association and Psi Chi is provided.

Contact Advisor:

Frances Daniel [email protected] Raintree 135 Office Number: (219) 980-6680

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You can also connect with many of our student organizations at our Student Involvement Fairs in August and January. Check out the Student Involvement Fairs webpage for the latest information.

For individualized assistance find the student organization that's right for you, schedule a Get Involved Consultation . These 30-minute meetings will provide a personalized list of recommendations based on your interests and aspirations.

Please consult this  list of student organizations with revoked registration as of Spring 2024 . Some organizations continue to operate after their registration has been revoked despite the action taken by the university. We encourage you to review an organization’s status before becoming involved with it, especially because sometimes an organization’s status is revoked due to serious concerns like hazing and other behavior that risks your health and safety.

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Psychology Activities

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The events on this list are approved Psychology Activities for all psychology classes. One activity may be credited to several classes. For activities not listed here, please obtain approval from your professor before attending. Below is the psychology activity form that can be used to report all of your psychology activities.

  • Psychology Activity Report (docx)

PSYC Activity Approval

Psychology activities must be approved by the department. Please email the Department of Psychology , if you are interested in having an activity considered for approval. All requests for psychology activities must be submitted in writing at least fourteen days before the event to be reviewed. Submission of an event does not assume approval.

Participate in Research for Psychology Activities

The Influence of Texting on Perceived Warmth: The Role of Punctuation and Emoji

Dear Liberty University Students,

As a student in the Psychology Department at Liberty University, I am conducting research for my honors thesis. The purpose of my research is to investigate the relationship between variations in texting phrases and perceived warmth of the texting phrases, and I am writing to invite you to join my study.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older and a residential undergraduate psychology student at Liberty University. Participants will be asked to take an anonymous, online survey. It should take approximately 8 minutes to complete the procedures listed. Participation will be completely anonymous, and no personal, identifying information will be collected.

To participate, please click here to complete the survey.

A study information sheet is provided as the first page of this survey. The document contains additional information about my research.

Because participation is anonymous, you do not need to sign and return the study information sheet. After you have read the form, please click the button to proceed to the survey. Doing so will indicate that you have read the information and would like to take part in the study.

Elizabeth Mathews

Undergraduate Honors Student

[email protected]

Feelings of Loneliness as a Predictor for the Type of Social Media Use in College Students: Mixed Methods Study

As a graduate student in the School of Behavioral Sciences at Liberty University, I am conducting research to better understand how loneliness is associated with different types of social media use and how our bodies may react to this.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older and enrolled in a residential course in the Psychology Department.

Participants, if willing, will be asked to complete an online questionnaire, submit a screenshot showing their time spent on social media, and measure their skin response levels and heart rate variability. It should take approximately 30 minutes to complete the procedures listed. After completing these procedures, you will be invited to take part in a qualitative structured interview. The interview will take about 15 minutes of your time. Names and other identifying information will be requested as part of this study, but the information will remain confidential.

To participate and schedule the screening session, please contact me via email.

The consent will be provided to you at the beginning of the survey. Because the participation is anonymous you do not need to sign and return the consent form unless you would prefer to do so.

Andrei Sigunov

Graduate Student

[email protected]

Grace, Relational Resilience, and the Role of Divine Forgiveness.

As a student in the Psychology Department at Liberty University, I am conducting research as part of the requirements for the Honors Program. The purpose of my research is to examine how an understanding and internalization of forgiveness from God and His grace allows people to have resilience in their relationships. I am writing to invite you to join my study.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older, and a residential undergraduate student at Liberty University taking a psychology course. Participants will be asked to take an anonymous, online survey. It should take approximately 40-50 minutes to complete the procedures listed. Participation will be completely anonymous, and no personal, identifying information will be collected.

To participate, please complete the study survey .

An information sheet is provided as the first page of the survey. The information sheet contains additional information about my research. Because participation is anonymous, you do not need to sign and return the information sheet. After you have read the information sheet, please click the button to proceed to the survey. Doing so will indicate that you have read the information sheet and would like to take part in the study.

Participants can receive 1 Psychology Activity credit.

Bethanie Dodd Undergraduate Honors Student [email protected]

The Relationship Between Social Media Use, Mindfulness, and Loneliness in College Students

As students in the School of Behavioral Sciences at Liberty University, we are conducting research to better understand the relationship between social media use, loneliness, and mindfulness. The purpose of my research is to see if there is a positive relationship between social media usage and loneliness, if mindfulness mediates that relationship, and finally, if social media engagement moderates that mediator role, and I am writing to invite eligible participants to join my study.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older and a residential undergraduate student at Liberty University. Participants, if willing, will be asked to fill out an online survey and email their screen time usage for the past two complete weeks to [email protected]. It should take approximately ten minutes to complete the survey and approximately 5 minutes to email the screen time usage to the email address provided above. Names and other identifying information will be requested as part of this study, but the information will remain confidential.

To participate, please click here or follow the link below and complete the online survey.

An information sheet is provided as the first page of the survey. The information sheet contains additional information about my research.

Participants will be entered in a raffle to win one of multiple $10 gift cards or will receive a psychology activity credit.

Sincerely, Prof. Blake Fraser’s Daniels Team [email protected]

Impact of College Student’s Experiences on Connection and Well-Being

As a graduate student in the School of Behavioral Sciences at Liberty University, I am conducting research to examine how different experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic relate to current social connectedness and well-being in students.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older and currently enrolled in at least one residential or online psychology course offered by Liberty University.

Participants, if willing, will be asked to come to the Research Lab in Psychology Suite A (3020) on the third floor of DeMoss Hall and complete an online survey on the Qualtrics platform. It should take approximately 20-25 minutes to complete this online survey. Participation will be completely anonymous, and no personal, identifying information will be collected.

To participate, please click here to sign-up or email me at [email protected] .

If interested, you may also choose to participate in an interview, which should take approximately 20 minutes to complete. Names and other identifying information will be requested as part of participation in the interview, but the information will remain confidential.

If you choose to participate in the interview, a second consent document will be emailed to you before the time of the interview. The consent document contains additional information about my research. If you choose to participate, you will need to type your name and date the consent document and return it to me via email at the time of the interview.

After completing the study, participants will receive one (1) psychology activity credit for completing the survey and two (2) additional psychology activity credits for completing the interview.

Nicole Airesman

[email protected]

Cyclical Relationships and Attachment

As a student in the School of Psychology at Liberty University. I am conducting research to better understand the connection between attachment styles and cyclical relationships. The purpose of my research is to determine if attachment style can be used as a predictor for cyclical relationships and I am writing to invite eligible participants to join my study.

Participants must be 18 years of age or older and have been in a romantic relationship prior to, or during this study. Participants, if willing, will be asked to complete an online survey. It should take approximately 10 minutes to complete the procedure listed. Participation will be completely anonymous, and no personal, identifying information will be collected.

To participate, please click [ here ].

A consent document is provided as the first page of the survey. The consent document contains additional information about my research. Because participation is anonymous, you do not need to sign and return the consent document unless you would prefer to do so.

Psychology students who participate will earn one activity credit.

Data collection will continue through April 1, 2024.

Emily Davis

[email protected]

Academic Success Center Workshop – Memorization

  • Date: Tuesday, February 13th, 2024
  • Location: DH 1284
  • Time 6:30-7:30 p.m.
  • Faculty Advisor: Dan Berkenkemper
  • Description: This presentation discusses techniques for long-term retention and large-scale memorization. We will explain the importance of spaced repetition for long-term retention.  We will also discuss the Leitner System, a flashcard system that is often used in conjunction with spaced repetition for memorizing large amounts of information.

Managing Conflict in the Workplace: Presented by Psi Chi Honor Society

  • Date – Monday, February 19, 2024
  • Location – DH 4412
  • Time – 6:30-7:30 pm
  • Host – Psi Chi Honor Society
  • Description – In the workplace, conflict is inevitable. This event will discuss how conflict in the workplace is caused and what it looks like. We will also discuss what can be done to prevent conflict or resolve it once it exists using real-world examples. This activity will count for 1 PSYC Activity Credit

PSYC 499: Internship with Dr. Kevin Conner – PSYC Majors Only!

  • Date- Monday, February 26, 2024
  • Location – DH 4412
  • Time- 10:30-11:30 am
  • Host- Dr. Kevin Conner and CSER Team
  • Description- This event is to provide much needed information on the elusive internship that often catches students off guard. It is not your normal run of the mill registration process. As well, it is not something you just do at the last minute. We will discuss the application process, the deadlines, the course expectations, and the opportunities that students have had in their internship. This is much needed information for PSYCHOLOGY MAJORS only!

The Pathway to Forgiveness: by Jichan Kim, PhD

  • Date-  March 5, 2024
  • Location-  DH 4412
  • Time-  6:30-7:30 pm
  • Host-  Department of Psychology & CSER workers
  • Description- Christians understand the importance of forgiveness, but Christians are not necessarily better forgivers. In this talk, Dr. Kim will discuss the Process Model of Forgiveness, which is scientifically supported to show improvement in forgiveness and psychological well-being. Attendees will learn about what forgiveness is, how to go about forgiving (four phases), and what science has discovered about the effects of forgiveness on human well-being.

Need a Job or Internship?: Presented by Audra Kopp from The Career Center

  • Date- March 21, 2024
  • Location- DH 4412
  • Time- 6:30-7:30 pm
  • Host- CSER Student Worker team
  • Description- This presentation will cover the necessary steps it takes to land a top job or internship within the Behavioral Science Field. The highlights will cover exploring career paths, building a resume, networking with employers, and how LU Career Services can help with the entire searching process.

safeTALK – Suicide Alertness for Everyone

  • Date – March 25, 2024
  • Location –  DH 1184
  • Time – 6:00-9:30 pm – This is a 3 1/2 hour training and this training can only accommodate 30 participants. Email Dr. Conner as spots are limited.
  • Host – Dr. Kevin Conner
  • Description – Everyone can help prevent suicide. Being ready to help could save a life. Learn to reach out to someone thinking about suicide, overcome attitudes that act as barriers to help, talk openly about suicide, and connect with further support. Learn the 4-

Mental Health Effects of Pornography: Presented by Psi Chi Honor Society

  • Date – April 9, 2024
  • Description – As porn becomes increasingly normalized, education on its well-documented harms becomes increasingly important. This event seeks to provide individuals with the information and resources to make an informed decision regarding pornography by raising awareness on its harmful effects using science, facts, and personal accounts. This activity will count for 1 PSYC Activity Credit.

Criminal Minds Case Study: Presented by Club Psych

  • Date – April 11, 2024
  • Host – Club Psych
  • Description – Join Club Psych as we compete to solve criminal case study puzzles and learn more about criminal psychology along the way. Fastest correct answers will receive prizes, and we will collectively go over the final solutions!

“ Neurofeedback: Transforming Mental Health Paradigms through EEG-based Assessment and Treatment (and watching TV)

  • Date – April 16, 2024
  • Location – DeMoss 4412
  • Time: 6:30pm – 7:30pm
  • Host – Department of Psychology
  • Description – The whispering winds of change are rustling in the mental health world. As interest and understanding grows in the interconnected roles of brain function, behavior, and the emergence of negative symptoms, is it possible to reconceptualize psychopathology? Do we need to rethink broad, imprecise, diagnostic categories that flounder to describe with specificity and reliability? And can we assume this different way of thinking might produce alternative treatments that transcend coping with and covering up problem symptoms such that we might (and dare we say!) actually cure mental health disorders? The answer is Yes. This presentation will describe how QEEG neuroanalysis is able to conceptualize the nature and etiology of symptoms clearly and accurately, beyond DSM categories. It will then provide an overview of neurofeedback, including the role of neuroplasticity, mechanisms of change, practical applications and considerations for clinicians, and treatment efficacy. Discussion with Q&A as time permits.

Psychology Internship and Work-Study Panel

  • Date – April 18th, 2024
  • Description – Join Club Psych as we introduce a panel of local internship and work-study coordinators. Hear about local internship and work opportunities, and get the chance to ask questions for more information!
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February 27, 2024 / 12:00pm - 1:00pm LaPenta School of Business Henry Lecture Hall - Rm. 105

February 29, 2024 / 3:30pm - 5:00pm Robert V. LaPenta Student Union, Jeanne & Steve McGrath Room A&B

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Psychology Club

The Psychology Club provides additional educational and networking opportunities for students with an interest in all areas of the Psychology field. Members engage in discussions about current issues and advancements in psychology, as well as ways to get involved in the field!

Among the events the club hosts on campus are opportunities to interact with therapy dogs, activities that help students de-stress and awareness-raising of suicide prevention.

The Psychology Club is open to students from any major, and only an interest in psychology is needed!

Erin O’Brien – [email protected]

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Psychology Clubs and Activities

Since 1972, the Psychology Department has sponsored a local chapter of Psi Chi , a national psychology student honorary. Membership is based on academic excellence and achievement in psychology.

Psi Chi, in conjunction with the Psychology Club, sponsors speakers and activities which further the understanding of psychology on campus and in the community. Every year, both organizations work with the Mercer County Mental Health Association to raise money for the service organizations of the county.

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Moscow’s nightlife scene is thriving, and arguably one of the best the world has to offer – top-notch Russian women, coupled with a never-ending list of venues, Moscow has a little bit of something for everyone’s taste. Moscow nightlife is not for the faint of heart – and if you’re coming, you better be ready to go Friday and Saturday night into the early morning.

This comprehensive guide to Moscow nightlife will run you through the nuts and bolts of all you need to know about Moscow’s nightclubs and give you a solid blueprint to operate with during your time in Moscow.

What you need to know before hitting Moscow nightclubs

Prices in moscow nightlife.

Before you head out and start gaming all the sexy Moscow girls , we have to talk money first. Bring plenty because in Moscow you can never bring a big enough bankroll. Remember, you’re the man so making a fuzz of not paying a drink here or there will not go down well.

Luckily most Moscow clubs don’t do cover fees. Some electro clubs will charge 15-20$, depending on their lineup. There’s the odd club with a minimum spend of 20-30$, which you’ll drop on drinks easily. By and large, you can scope out the venues for free, which is a big plus.

Bottle service is a great deal in Moscow. At top-tier clubs, it starts at 1,000$. That’ll go a long way with premium vodka at 250$, especially if you have three or four guys chipping in. Not to mention that it’s a massive status boost for getting girls, especially at high-end clubs.

Without bottle service, you should estimate a budget of 100-150$ per night. That is if you drink a lot and hit the top clubs with the hottest girls. Scale down for less alcohol and more basic places.

Dress code & Face control

Door policy in Moscow is called “face control” and it’s always the guy behind the two gorillas that gives the green light if you’re in or out.

In Moscow nightlife there’s only one rule when it comes to dress codes:

You can never be underdressed.

People dress A LOT sharper than, say, in the US and that goes for both sexes. For high-end clubs, you definitely want to roll with a sharp blazer and a pocket square, not to mention dress shoes in tip-top condition. Those are the minimum requirements to level the playing field vis a vis with other sharply dressed guys that have a lot more money than you do. Unless you plan to hit explicit electro or underground clubs, which have their own dress code, you are always on the money with that style.

Getting in a Moscow club isn’t as hard as it seems: dress sharp, speak English at the door and look like you’re in the mood to spend all that money that you supposedly have (even if you don’t). That will open almost any door in Moscow’s nightlife for you.

Types of Moscow Nightclubs

In Moscow there are four types of clubs with the accompanying female clientele:

High-end clubs:

These are often crossovers between restaurants and clubs with lots of tables and very little space to dance. Heavy accent on bottle service most of the time but you can work the room from the bar as well. The hottest and most expensive girls in Moscow go there. Bring deep pockets and lots of self-confidence and you have a shot at swooping them.

Regular Mid-level clubs:

They probably resemble more what you’re used to in a nightclub: big dancefloors, stages and more space to roam around. Bottle service will make you stand out more but you can also do well without. You can find all types of girls but most will be in the 6-8 range. Your targets should always be the girls drinking and ideally in pairs. It’s impossible not to swoop if your game is at least half-decent.

Basic clubs/dive bars:

Usually spots with very cheap booze and lax face control. If you’re dressed too sharp and speak no Russian, you might attract the wrong type of attention so be vigilant. If you know the local scene you can swoop 6s and 7s almost at will. Usually students and girls from the suburbs.

Electro/underground clubs:

Home of the hipsters and creatives. Parties there don’t mean meeting girls and getting drunk but doing pills and spacing out to the music. Lots of attractive hipster girls if that is your niche. That is its own scene with a different dress code as well.

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What time to go out in Moscow

Moscow nightlife starts late. Don’t show up at bars and preparty spots before 11pm because you’ll feel fairly alone. Peak time is between 1am and 3am. That is also the time of Moscow nightlife’s biggest nuisance: concerts by artists you won’t know and who only distract your girls from drinking and being gamed. From 4am to 6am the regular clubs are emptying out but plenty of people, women included, still hit up one of the many afterparty clubs. Those last till well past 10am.

As far as days go: Fridays and Saturdays are peak days. Thursday is an OK day, all other days are fairly weak and you have to know the right venues.

The Ultimate Moscow Nightclub List

Short disclaimer: I didn’t add basic and electro clubs since you’re coming for the girls, not for the music. This list will give you more options than you’ll be able to handle on a weekend.

Preparty – start here at 11PM

Classic restaurant club with lots of tables and a smallish bar and dancefloor. Come here between 11pm and 12am when the concert is over and they start with the actual party. Even early in the night tons of sexy women here, who lean slightly older (25 and up).

The second floor of the Ugolek restaurant is an extra bar with dim lights and house music tunes. Very small and cozy with a slight hipster vibe but generally draws plenty of attractive women too. A bit slower vibe than Valenok.

Very cool, spread-out venue that has a modern library theme. Not always full with people but when it is, it’s brimming with top-tier women. Slow vibe here and better for grabbing contacts and moving on.

psychology club activities

High-end: err on the side of being too early rather than too late because of face control.

Secret Room

Probably the top venue at the moment in Moscow . Very small but wildly popular club, which is crammed with tables but always packed. They do parties on Thursdays and Sundays as well. This club has a hip-hop/high-end theme, meaning most girls are gold diggers, IG models, and tattooed hip hop chicks. Very unfavorable logistics because there is almost no room no move inside the club but the party vibe makes it worth it. Strict face control.

Close to Secret Room and with a much more favorable and spacious three-part layout. This place attracts very hot women but also lots of ball busters and fakes that will leave you blue-balled. Come early because after 4am it starts getting empty fast. Electronic music.

A slightly kitsch restaurant club that plays Russian pop and is full of gold diggers, semi-pros, and men from the Caucasus republics. Thursday is the strongest night but that dynamic might be changing since Secret Room opened its doors. You can swoop here but it will be a struggle.

psychology club activities

Mid-level: your sweet spot in terms of ease and attractiveness of girls for an average budget.

Started going downwards in 2018 due to lax face control and this might get even worse with the World Cup. In terms of layout one of the best Moscow nightclubs because it’s very big and bottle service gives you a good edge here. Still attracts lots of cute girls with loose morals but plenty of provincial girls (and guys) as well. Swooping is fairly easy here.

I haven’t been at this place in over a year, ever since it started becoming ground zero for drunken teenagers. Similar clientele to Icon but less chic, younger and drunker. Decent mainstream music that attracts plenty of tourists. Girls are easy here as well.

Sort of a Coyote Ugly (the real one in Moscow sucks) with party music and lots of drunken people licking each others’ faces. Very entertaining with the right amount of alcohol and very easy to pull in there. Don’t think about staying sober in here, you’ll hate it.

Artel Bessonitsa/Shakti Terrace

Electronic music club that is sort of a high-end place with an underground clientele and located between the teenager clubs Icon and Gipsy. Very good music but a bit all over the place with their vibe and their branding. You can swoop almost any type of girl here from high-heeled beauty to coked-up hipsters, provided they’re not too sober.

psychology club activities

Afterparty: if by 5AM  you haven’t pulled, it’s time to move here.

Best afterparty spot in terms of trying to get girls. Pretty much no one is sober in there and savage gorilla game goes a long way. Lots of very hot and slutty-looking girls but it can be hard to tell apart who is looking for dick and who is just on drugs but not interested. If by 9-10am you haven’t pulled, it is probably better to surrender.

The hipster alternative for afterparties, where even more drugs are in play. Plenty of attractive girls there but you have to know how to work this type of club. A nicer atmosphere and better music but if you’re desperate to pull, you’ll probably go to Miks.

Weekday jokers: if you’re on the hunt for some sexy Russian girls during the week, here are two tips to make your life easier.

Chesterfield

Ladies night on Wednesdays means this place gets pretty packed with smashed teenagers and 6s and 7s. Don’t pull out the three-piece suit in here because it’s a “simpler” crowd. Definitely your best shot on Wednesdays.

If you haven’t pulled at Chesterfield, you can throw a Hail Mary and hit up Garage’s Black Music Wednesdays. Fills up really late but there are some cute Black Music groupies in here. Very small club. Thursday through Saturday they do afterparties and you have an excellent shot and swooping girls that are probably high.

Shishas Sferum

This is pretty much your only shot on Mondays and Tuesdays because they offer free or almost free drinks for women. A fairly low-class club where you should watch your drinks. As always the case in Moscow, there will be cute girls here on any day of the week but it’s nowhere near as good as on the weekend.

psychology club activities

In a nutshell, that is all you need to know about where to meet Moscow girls in nightlife. There are tons of options, and it all depends on what best fits your style, based on the type of girls that you’re looking for.

Related Topics

  • moscow girls
  • moscow nightlife

psychology club activities

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An Insider's Guide to Moscow Nightlife

Nightlife

As a city that never sleeps, Moscow is known for its vibrant nightlife as much as for its stunning architecture. Having a plethora of choice, you may need someone to guide guide you through the club scene of Russia’s capital. Read on for the best places to take you through the night.

One of Moscow’s oldest nightclubs, Propaganda is an iconic spot that’s been around since the 1990s. Featuring deliberately shabby interiors, Propaganda, affectionately called “ propka ” by regulars, still gathers crowds even on weekdays. The club is particularly favored for scoring world-class DJs, hosting gay parties on Sundays and offering tasty and inexpensive food .

7 Bolshoy Zlatoustinsky Pereulok, Moscow, Russia , +7 495 624 5732

Another legendary spot, frequented by the cool crowd, this bar was founded by celebrated Russian designer Denis Simachev. Fancier and pricier than Propaganda, it’s worth a visit if only for eclectic interiors and salmon pizza.

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12 Stoleshnikov Pereulok, Moscow, Russia , +7 495 629 80 85

Nauka i Iskusstvo

Tiny and nondescript, Nauka i Iskusstvo (‘Science and Art’) is all about the music . Although there are no fancy cocktails, glitzy interiors or bohemian entourage, the club hosts some of the best electronic parties, hip music gigs and cool designer shows.

13/15 Nastavnichesky Pereulok, bld.3, Moscow, Russia

One of Moscow’s quirkiest nightclubs, Squat ¾ occupies the basement of the former Central Baths building. Instagrammed by Moscow’s it-girls, the club is famous for gothic techno-balls and bohemian raves. Apart from the club and a bar, it is also home to a Greek cafe, barber shop and fashion store.

3 Teatralny Proyezd, Bld. 4, Moscow, Russia , +7 967 162 6062

The newest venue on the list, Pluton is located on the premises of the hip design center Artplay. Despite the high ceilings of a former industrial building and tiled walls, Pluton feels strangely homely and comforting. Opened in 2017, this is not a nightclub in the traditional sense. Pluton promotes all kinds of events: from cathartic ambient, to jazz music to art-performances.

8A Nizhnyaya Syromyatnicheskaya Ulitsa, Moscow, Russia , +7 903 254 2669

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bc17o50FqNO/?taken-by=plutonplace

Another Artplay resident, Rodnya is a rooftop club that hosts resident DJ sets and international bands on tour. In summer you can dance until sunrise on the club’s rooftop terrace.

5/7 Nizhnyaya Syromyatnicheskaya Ulitsa, bld.7, Moscow, Russia , +7 925 003 559

Aglomerat is a multi-purpose art space, housed in the former Mars factory. With a spectacularly dystopian interiors, it plays host to all kinds of events – from movie screenings and art exhibitions , to metal band shows and rave nights.

3 Kostomarovsky Pereulok, Bldg. 12, Moscow, Russia , +7 968 450 8760

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COMMENTS

  1. Ideas for a Psychology Club?

    #1 I was just elected president of my college Psychology Club. Any ideas of some events/ideas we can do? Members don't see this ad. AcronymAllergy Neuropsychologist Volunteer Staff Lifetime Donor Verified Member 10+ Year Member Psychologist Verified Expert Platinum Member Joined Jan 7, 2010 Messages 9,253 Reaction score 5,455

  2. 28 Mental Health Games, Activities & Worksheets (& PDF)

    1. Thought Record Worksheet This PDF is a way to record one's thoughts and reflect on them. It asks the user to log their emotions and thoughts as well as what was going on to make them feel that way, then has the user reflect on whether or not there is evidence to back up their automatic thoughts.

  3. Activities for Psychology Club: Engaging and Exciting Experiences for

    1. Guest Speakers 2. Group Discussions 3. Volunteer Work 4. Movie Nights 5. Workshops 6. Mind Games 1. Guest Speakers Inviting guest speakers to present on a variety of topics is a great way to provide value to your members.

  4. Psychology Clubs

    Psychology clubs can become involved in many activities. Students can become involved with community service projects, such as volunteering at a mental health care facility, or fundraising for a mental health organization. Students also enjoy guest speakers who can address psychological issues.

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    August 6, 2023 The Benefits of Joining a Psychology Club: Activities That Can Improve Your Mental Health Are you feeling stressed out, anxious, or overwhelmed? Do you want to improve your mental health? Joining a psychology club might be just what you need.

  6. Extracurricular activities for psychology students

    One of the most valuable extracurricular activities for psychology students is joining a psychology or mental health club. Many institutions provide psychology or mental health-focused student organizations where people with similar interests can connect.

  7. Psychology Club Activities? : r/psychologystudents

    Basic research methods stuff, how to find scholarly sources, how to look for unanswered questions in existing literature, how to create a hypothesis, stuff like that. Or alternatively, if your group is more interested in clinical work, working in pairs to practice basic counseling techniques like reflective listening, summary, empathy, open and ...

  8. Inside the mind of Psychology Club: Building a welcoming atmosphere for all

    Underscoring the importance of making meetings and activities accessible, the Psychology Club's activities do not require prior knowledge of any kind in the field. The club's structure reflects a desire to be open to everyone.

  9. Ideas for a Psych club : r/psychologystudents

    Ideas for a Psych club Ideas The psychology department at my university is starting a Psychology club and I was wondering what sort of events or activities could be done in such clubs. These are not exclusively for the club and/or the psych department, need ideas on whats something that could involve students of different departments aswell.

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    Volunteer Help people in your community and across the country better understand psychology and its application to daily life ACT Raising Safe Kids Help provide nurturing environments for children by teaching positive parenting skills to parents and caregivers. APA Media Referral Service

  11. Exciting Psychology Club Ideas for an Engaging Experience

    Here are some innovative and exciting psychology club ideas that can help you create a club that people look forward to attending. Table of Contents A Book Club Guest Speaker Series Group Discussions & Debates Volunteer Work in a Mental Health Institution Field Trips Professional Development Workshops Movie Screenings & Analysis

  12. Psychology Club

    Activities Discussing psychological topics (such as free will; effect of trauma on emotional development) Guest speaker presentations (happiness; psychology of taste) Discussing psychology major topics (graduate school and careers in psychology) Experiments (taste testing and perception of illusions) Movie nights (Split)

  13. Clubs and Activities

    Psychology Club is a great way to meet other students and faculty in the department, learn about graduate school and career options, and learn about volunteer and internship opportunities. You will also be able to find out about research being conducted in the department and how to get involved.

  14. Psychology Clubs and Activities

    Students are encouraged to join the Psychology Club, which sponsors speakers, field trips, service activities, and graduate school preparation sessions. The department also has a chapter of Psi Chi, the national honor society in psychology. Psychology Club. The Psychology Club is an organization for students who are interested in psychology.

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  18. Psi Chi, The International Honor Society in Psychology

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  20. Psychology Clubs and Activities

    Psi Chi. Since 1972, the Psychology Department has sponsored a local chapter of Psi Chi, a national psychology student honorary. Membership is based on academic excellence and achievement in psychology. Psi Chi, in conjunction with the Psychology Club, sponsors speakers and activities which further the understanding of psychology on campus and ...

  21. About MSUPE

    Moscow State University of Psychology & Education - the first psychological university and one of the top universities of psychological studies in Russia.. Founded under the initiative of the Moscow Government, the University aims at training highly qualified specialists in the field of education, healthcare and social protection.. As a basic resource center of psychological service, MSUPE ...

  22. The Comprehensive Guide to Moscow Nightlife

    Some electro clubs will charge 15-20$, depending on their lineup. There's the odd club with a minimum spend of 20-30$, which you'll drop on drinks easily. By and large, you can scope out the venues for free, which is a big plus. Bottle service is a great deal in Moscow. At top-tier clubs, it starts at 1,000$.

  23. An Insider's Guide to Moscow Nightlife

    One of Moscow's oldest nightclubs, Propaganda is an iconic spot that's been around since the 1990s. Featuring deliberately shabby interiors, Propaganda, affectionately called "propka" by regulars, still gathers crowds even on weekdays.The club is particularly favored for scoring world-class DJs, hosting gay parties on Sundays and offering tasty and inexpensive food.