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7 Research-Based Reasons Why Students Should Not Have Homework: Academic Insights, Opposing Perspectives & Alternatives

In recent years, the question of why students should not have homework has become a topic of intense debate among educators, parents, and students themselves. This discussion stems from a growing body of research that challenges the traditional view of homework as an essential component of academic success. The notion that homework is an integral part of learning is being reevaluated in light of new findings about its effectiveness and impact on students’ overall well-being.

Why Students Should Not Have Homework

The push against homework is not just about the hours spent on completing assignments; it’s about rethinking the role of education in fostering the well-rounded development of young individuals. Critics argue that homework, particularly in excessive amounts, can lead to negative outcomes such as stress, burnout, and a diminished love for learning. Moreover, it often disproportionately affects students from disadvantaged backgrounds, exacerbating educational inequities. The debate also highlights the importance of allowing children to have enough free time for play, exploration, and family interaction, which are crucial for their social and emotional development.

Checking 13yo’s math homework & I have just one question. I can catch mistakes & help her correct. But what do kids do when their parent isn’t an Algebra teacher? Answer: They get frustrated. Quit. Get a bad grade. Think they aren’t good at math. How is homework fair??? — Jay Wamsted (@JayWamsted) March 24, 2022

As we delve into this discussion, we explore various facets of why reducing or even eliminating homework could be beneficial. We consider the research, weigh the pros and cons, and examine alternative approaches to traditional homework that can enhance learning without overburdening students.

Once you’ve finished this article, you’ll know:

  • Insights from Teachers and Education Industry Experts →
  • 7 Reasons Why Students Should Not Have Homework →
  • Opposing Views on Homework Practices →
  • Exploring Alternatives to Homework →

Insights from Teachers and Education Industry Experts: Diverse Perspectives on Homework

In the ongoing conversation about the role and impact of homework in education, the perspectives of those directly involved in the teaching process are invaluable. Teachers and education industry experts bring a wealth of experience and insights from the front lines of learning. Their viewpoints, shaped by years of interaction with students and a deep understanding of educational methodologies, offer a critical lens through which we can evaluate the effectiveness and necessity of homework in our current educational paradigm.

Check out this video featuring Courtney White, a high school language arts teacher who gained widespread attention for her explanation of why she chooses not to assign homework.

Here are the insights and opinions from various experts in the educational field on this topic:

“I teach 1st grade. I had parents ask for homework. I explained that I don’t give homework. Home time is family time. Time to play, cook, explore and spend time together. I do send books home, but there is no requirement or checklist for reading them. Read them, enjoy them, and return them when your child is ready for more. I explained that as a parent myself, I know they are busy—and what a waste of energy it is to sit and force their kids to do work at home—when they could use that time to form relationships and build a loving home. Something kids need more than a few math problems a week.” — Colleen S. , 1st grade teacher
“The lasting educational value of homework at that age is not proven. A kid says the times tables [at school] because he studied the times tables last night. But over a long period of time, a kid who is drilled on the times tables at school, rather than as homework, will also memorize their times tables. We are worried about young children and their social emotional learning. And that has to do with physical activity, it has to do with playing with peers, it has to do with family time. All of those are very important and can be removed by too much homework.” — David Bloomfield , education professor at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York graduate center
“Homework in primary school has an effect of around zero. In high school it’s larger. (…) Which is why we need to get it right. Not why we need to get rid of it. It’s one of those lower hanging fruit that we should be looking in our primary schools to say, ‘Is it really making a difference?’” — John Hattie , professor
”Many kids are working as many hours as their overscheduled parents and it is taking a toll – psychologically and in many other ways too. We see kids getting up hours before school starts just to get their homework done from the night before… While homework may give kids one more responsibility, it ignores the fact that kids do not need to grow up and become adults at ages 10 or 12. With schools cutting recess time or eliminating playgrounds, kids absorb every single stress there is, only on an even higher level. Their brains and bodies need time to be curious, have fun, be creative and just be a kid.” — Pat Wayman, teacher and CEO of HowtoLearn.com

7 Reasons Why Students Should Not Have Homework

Let’s delve into the reasons against assigning homework to students. Examining these arguments offers important perspectives on the wider educational and developmental consequences of homework practices.

1. Elevated Stress and Health Consequences

Elevated Stress and Health Consequences

The ongoing debate about homework often focuses on its educational value, but a vital aspect that cannot be overlooked is the significant stress and health consequences it brings to students. In the context of American life, where approximately 70% of people report moderate or extreme stress due to various factors like mass shootings, healthcare affordability, discrimination, racism, sexual harassment, climate change, presidential elections, and the need to stay informed, the additional burden of homework further exacerbates this stress, particularly among students.

Key findings and statistics reveal a worrying trend:

  • Overwhelming Student Stress: A staggering 72% of students report being often or always stressed over schoolwork, with a concerning 82% experiencing physical symptoms due to this stress.
  • Serious Health Issues: Symptoms linked to homework stress include sleep deprivation, headaches, exhaustion, weight loss, and stomach problems.
  • Sleep Deprivation: Despite the National Sleep Foundation recommending 8.5 to 9.25 hours of sleep for healthy adolescent development, students average just 6.80 hours of sleep on school nights. About 68% of students stated that schoolwork often or always prevented them from getting enough sleep, which is critical for their physical and mental health.
  • Turning to Unhealthy Coping Mechanisms: Alarmingly, the pressure from excessive homework has led some students to turn to alcohol and drugs as a way to cope with stress.

This data paints a concerning picture. Students, already navigating a world filled with various stressors, find themselves further burdened by homework demands. The direct correlation between excessive homework and health issues indicates a need for reevaluation. The goal should be to ensure that homework if assigned, adds value to students’ learning experiences without compromising their health and well-being.

By addressing the issue of homework-related stress and health consequences, we can take a significant step toward creating a more nurturing and effective educational environment. This environment would not only prioritize academic achievement but also the overall well-being and happiness of students, preparing them for a balanced and healthy life both inside and outside the classroom.

2. Inequitable Impact and Socioeconomic Disparities

Inequitable Impact and Socioeconomic Disparities

In the discourse surrounding educational equity, homework emerges as a factor exacerbating socioeconomic disparities, particularly affecting students from lower-income families and those with less supportive home environments. While homework is often justified as a means to raise academic standards and promote equity, its real-world impact tells a different story.

The inequitable burden of homework becomes starkly evident when considering the resources required to complete it, especially in the digital age. Homework today often necessitates a computer and internet access – resources not readily available to all students. This digital divide significantly disadvantages students from lower-income backgrounds, deepening the chasm between them and their more affluent peers.

Key points highlighting the disparities:

  • Digital Inequity: Many students lack access to necessary technology for homework, with low-income families disproportionately affected.
  • Impact of COVID-19: The pandemic exacerbated these disparities as education shifted online, revealing the extent of the digital divide.
  • Educational Outcomes Tied to Income: A critical indicator of college success is linked more to family income levels than to rigorous academic preparation. Research indicates that while 77% of students from high-income families graduate from highly competitive colleges, only 9% from low-income families achieve the same . This disparity suggests that the pressure of heavy homework loads, rather than leveling the playing field, may actually hinder the chances of success for less affluent students.

Moreover, the approach to homework varies significantly across different types of schools. While some rigorous private and preparatory schools in both marginalized and affluent communities assign extreme levels of homework, many progressive schools focusing on holistic learning and self-actualization opt for no homework, yet achieve similar levels of college and career success. This contrast raises questions about the efficacy and necessity of heavy homework loads in achieving educational outcomes.

The issue of homework and its inequitable impact is not just an academic concern; it is a reflection of broader societal inequalities. By continuing practices that disproportionately burden students from less privileged backgrounds, the educational system inadvertently perpetuates the very disparities it seeks to overcome.

3. Negative Impact on Family Dynamics

Negative Impact on Family Dynamics

Homework, a staple of the educational system, is often perceived as a necessary tool for academic reinforcement. However, its impact extends beyond the realm of academics, significantly affecting family dynamics. The negative repercussions of homework on the home environment have become increasingly evident, revealing a troubling pattern that can lead to conflict, mental health issues, and domestic friction.

A study conducted in 2015 involving 1,100 parents sheds light on the strain homework places on family relationships. The findings are telling:

  • Increased Likelihood of Conflicts: Families where parents did not have a college degree were 200% more likely to experience fights over homework.
  • Misinterpretations and Misunderstandings: Parents often misinterpret their children’s difficulties with homework as a lack of attention in school, leading to feelings of frustration and mistrust on both sides.
  • Discriminatory Impact: The research concluded that the current approach to homework disproportionately affects children whose parents have lower educational backgrounds, speak English as a second language, or belong to lower-income groups.

The issue is not confined to specific demographics but is a widespread concern. Samantha Hulsman, a teacher featured in Education Week Teacher , shared her personal experience with the toll that homework can take on family time. She observed that a seemingly simple 30-minute assignment could escalate into a three-hour ordeal, causing stress and strife between parents and children. Hulsman’s insights challenge the traditional mindset about homework, highlighting a shift towards the need for skills such as collaboration and problem-solving over rote memorization of facts.

The need of the hour is to reassess the role and amount of homework assigned to students. It’s imperative to find a balance that facilitates learning and growth without compromising the well-being of the family unit. Such a reassessment would not only aid in reducing domestic conflicts but also contribute to a more supportive and nurturing environment for children’s overall development.

4. Consumption of Free Time

Consumption of Free Time

In recent years, a growing chorus of voices has raised concerns about the excessive burden of homework on students, emphasizing how it consumes their free time and impedes their overall well-being. The issue is not just the quantity of homework, but its encroachment on time that could be used for personal growth, relaxation, and family bonding.

Authors Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish , in their book “The Case Against Homework,” offer an insightful window into the lives of families grappling with the demands of excessive homework. They share stories from numerous interviews conducted in the mid-2000s, highlighting the universal struggle faced by families across different demographics. A poignant account from a parent in Menlo Park, California, describes nightly sessions extending until 11 p.m., filled with stress and frustration, leading to a soured attitude towards school in both the child and the parent. This narrative is not isolated, as about one-third of the families interviewed expressed feeling crushed by the overwhelming workload.

Key points of concern:

  • Excessive Time Commitment: Students, on average, spend over 6 hours in school each day, and homework adds significantly to this time, leaving little room for other activities.
  • Impact on Extracurricular Activities: Homework infringes upon time for sports, music, art, and other enriching experiences, which are as crucial as academic courses.
  • Stifling Creativity and Self-Discovery: The constant pressure of homework limits opportunities for students to explore their interests and learn new skills independently.

The National Education Association (NEA) and the National PTA (NPTA) recommend a “10 minutes of homework per grade level” standard, suggesting a more balanced approach. However, the reality often far exceeds this guideline, particularly for older students. The impact of this overreach is profound, affecting not just academic performance but also students’ attitudes toward school, their self-confidence, social skills, and overall quality of life.

Furthermore, the intense homework routine’s effectiveness is doubtful, as it can overwhelm students and detract from the joy of learning. Effective learning builds on prior knowledge in an engaging way, but excessive homework in a home setting may be irrelevant and uninteresting. The key challenge is balancing homework to enhance learning without overburdening students, allowing time for holistic growth and activities beyond academics. It’s crucial to reassess homework policies to support well-rounded development.

5. Challenges for Students with Learning Disabilities

Challenges for Students with Learning Disabilities

Homework, a standard educational tool, poses unique challenges for students with learning disabilities, often leading to a frustrating and disheartening experience. These challenges go beyond the typical struggles faced by most students and can significantly impede their educational progress and emotional well-being.

Child psychologist Kenneth Barish’s insights in Psychology Today shed light on the complex relationship between homework and students with learning disabilities:

  • Homework as a Painful Endeavor: For students with learning disabilities, completing homework can be likened to “running with a sprained ankle.” It’s a task that, while doable, is fraught with difficulty and discomfort.
  • Misconceptions about Laziness: Often, children who struggle with homework are perceived as lazy. However, Barish emphasizes that these students are more likely to be frustrated, discouraged, or anxious rather than unmotivated.
  • Limited Improvement in School Performance: The battles over homework rarely translate into significant improvement in school for these children, challenging the conventional notion of homework as universally beneficial.

These points highlight the need for a tailored approach to homework for students with learning disabilities. It’s crucial to recognize that the traditional homework model may not be the most effective or appropriate method for facilitating their learning. Instead, alternative strategies that accommodate their unique needs and learning styles should be considered.

In conclusion, the conventional homework paradigm needs reevaluation, particularly concerning students with learning disabilities. By understanding and addressing their unique challenges, educators can create a more inclusive and supportive educational environment. This approach not only aids in their academic growth but also nurtures their confidence and overall development, ensuring that they receive an equitable and empathetic educational experience.

6. Critique of Underlying Assumptions about Learning

Critique of Underlying Assumptions about Learning

The longstanding belief in the educational sphere that more homework automatically translates to more learning is increasingly being challenged. Critics argue that this assumption is not only flawed but also unsupported by solid evidence, questioning the efficacy of homework as an effective learning tool.

Alfie Kohn , a prominent critic of homework, aptly compares students to vending machines in this context, suggesting that the expectation of inserting an assignment and automatically getting out of learning is misguided. Kohn goes further, labeling homework as the “greatest single extinguisher of children’s curiosity.” This critique highlights a fundamental issue: the potential of homework to stifle the natural inquisitiveness and love for learning in children.

The lack of concrete evidence supporting the effectiveness of homework is evident in various studies:

  • Marginal Effectiveness of Homework: A study involving 28,051 high school seniors found that the effectiveness of homework was marginal, and in some cases, it was counterproductive, leading to more academic problems than solutions.
  • No Correlation with Academic Achievement: Research in “ National Differences, Global Similarities ” showed no correlation between homework and academic achievement in elementary students, and any positive correlation in middle or high school diminished with increasing homework loads.
  • Increased Academic Pressure: The Teachers College Record published findings that homework adds to academic pressure and societal stress, exacerbating performance gaps between students from different socioeconomic backgrounds.

These findings bring to light several critical points:

  • Quality Over Quantity: According to a recent article in Monitor on Psychology , experts concur that the quality of homework assignments, along with the quality of instruction, student motivation, and inherent ability, is more crucial for academic success than the quantity of homework.
  • Counterproductive Nature of Excessive Homework: Excessive homework can lead to more academic challenges, particularly for students already facing pressures from other aspects of their lives.
  • Societal Stress and Performance Gaps: Homework can intensify societal stress and widen the academic performance divide.

The emerging consensus from these studies suggests that the traditional approach to homework needs rethinking. Rather than focusing on the quantity of assignments, educators should consider the quality and relevance of homework, ensuring it truly contributes to learning and development. This reassessment is crucial for fostering an educational environment that nurtures curiosity and a love for learning, rather than extinguishing it.

7. Issues with Homework Enforcement, Reliability, and Temptation to Cheat

Issues with Homework Enforcement, Reliability, and Temptation to Cheat

In the academic realm, the enforcement of homework is a subject of ongoing debate, primarily due to its implications on student integrity and the true value of assignments. The challenges associated with homework enforcement often lead to unintended yet significant issues, such as cheating, copying, and a general undermining of educational values.

Key points highlighting enforcement challenges:

  • Difficulty in Enforcing Completion: Ensuring that students complete their homework can be a complex task, and not completing homework does not always correlate with poor grades.
  • Reliability of Homework Practice: The reliability of homework as a practice tool is undermined when students, either out of desperation or lack of understanding, choose shortcuts over genuine learning. This approach can lead to the opposite of the intended effect, especially when assignments are not well-aligned with the students’ learning levels or interests.
  • Temptation to Cheat: The issue of cheating is particularly troubling. According to a report by The Chronicle of Higher Education , under the pressure of at-home assignments, many students turn to copying others’ work, plagiarizing, or using creative technological “hacks.” This tendency not only questions the integrity of the learning process but also reflects the extreme stress that homework can induce.
  • Parental Involvement in Completion: As noted in The American Journal of Family Therapy , this raises concerns about the authenticity of the work submitted. When parents complete assignments for their children, it not only deprives the students of the opportunity to learn but also distorts the purpose of homework as a learning aid.

In conclusion, the challenges of homework enforcement present a complex problem that requires careful consideration. The focus should shift towards creating meaningful, manageable, and quality-driven assignments that encourage genuine learning and integrity, rather than overwhelming students and prompting counterproductive behaviors.

Addressing Opposing Views on Homework Practices

While opinions on homework policies are diverse, understanding different viewpoints is crucial. In the following sections, we will examine common arguments supporting homework assignments, along with counterarguments that offer alternative perspectives on this educational practice.

1. Improvement of Academic Performance

Improvement of Academic Performance

Homework is commonly perceived as a means to enhance academic performance, with the belief that it directly contributes to better grades and test scores. This view posits that through homework, students reinforce what they learn in class, leading to improved understanding and retention, which ultimately translates into higher academic achievement.

However, the question of why students should not have homework becomes pertinent when considering the complex relationship between homework and academic performance. Studies have indicated that excessive homework doesn’t necessarily equate to higher grades or test scores. Instead, too much homework can backfire, leading to stress and fatigue that adversely affect a student’s performance. Reuters highlights an intriguing correlation suggesting that physical activity may be more conducive to academic success than additional homework, underscoring the importance of a holistic approach to education that prioritizes both physical and mental well-being for enhanced academic outcomes.

2. Reinforcement of Learning

Reinforcement of Learning

Homework is traditionally viewed as a tool to reinforce classroom learning, enabling students to practice and retain material. However, research suggests its effectiveness is ambiguous. In instances where homework is well-aligned with students’ abilities and classroom teachings, it can indeed be beneficial. Particularly for younger students , excessive homework can cause burnout and a loss of interest in learning, counteracting its intended purpose.

Furthermore, when homework surpasses a student’s capability, it may induce frustration and confusion rather than aid in learning. This challenges the notion that more homework invariably leads to better understanding and retention of educational content.

3. Development of Time Management Skills

Development of Time Management Skills

Homework is often considered a crucial tool in helping students develop important life skills such as time management and organization. The idea is that by regularly completing assignments, students learn to allocate their time efficiently and organize their tasks effectively, skills that are invaluable in both academic and personal life.

However, the impact of homework on developing these skills is not always positive. For younger students, especially, an overwhelming amount of homework can be more of a hindrance than a help. Instead of fostering time management and organizational skills, an excessive workload often leads to stress and anxiety . These negative effects can impede the learning process and make it difficult for students to manage their time and tasks effectively, contradicting the original purpose of homework.

4. Preparation for Future Academic Challenges

Preparation for Future Academic Challenges

Homework is often touted as a preparatory tool for future academic challenges that students will encounter in higher education and their professional lives. The argument is that by tackling homework, students build a foundation of knowledge and skills necessary for success in more advanced studies and in the workforce, fostering a sense of readiness and confidence.

Contrarily, an excessive homework load, especially from a young age, can have the opposite effect . It can instill a negative attitude towards education, dampening students’ enthusiasm and willingness to embrace future academic challenges. Overburdening students with homework risks disengagement and loss of interest, thereby defeating the purpose of preparing them for future challenges. Striking a balance in the amount and complexity of homework is crucial to maintaining student engagement and fostering a positive attitude towards ongoing learning.

5. Parental Involvement in Education

Parental Involvement in Education

Homework often acts as a vital link connecting parents to their child’s educational journey, offering insights into the school’s curriculum and their child’s learning process. This involvement is key in fostering a supportive home environment and encouraging a collaborative relationship between parents and the school. When parents understand and engage with what their children are learning, it can significantly enhance the educational experience for the child.

However, the line between involvement and over-involvement is thin. When parents excessively intervene by completing their child’s homework,  it can have adverse effects . Such actions not only diminish the educational value of homework but also rob children of the opportunity to develop problem-solving skills and independence. This over-involvement, coupled with disparities in parental ability to assist due to variations in time, knowledge, or resources, may lead to unequal educational outcomes, underlining the importance of a balanced approach to parental participation in homework.

Exploring Alternatives to Homework and Finding a Middle Ground

Exploring Alternatives to Homework

In the ongoing debate about the role of homework in education, it’s essential to consider viable alternatives and strategies to minimize its burden. While completely eliminating homework may not be feasible for all educators, there are several effective methods to reduce its impact and offer more engaging, student-friendly approaches to learning.

Alternatives to Traditional Homework

  • Project-Based Learning: This method focuses on hands-on, long-term projects where students explore real-world problems. It encourages creativity, critical thinking, and collaborative skills, offering a more engaging and practical learning experience than traditional homework. For creative ideas on school projects, especially related to the solar system, be sure to explore our dedicated article on solar system projects .
  • Flipped Classrooms: Here, students are introduced to new content through videos or reading materials at home and then use class time for interactive activities. This approach allows for more personalized and active learning during school hours.
  • Reading for Pleasure: Encouraging students to read books of their choice can foster a love for reading and improve literacy skills without the pressure of traditional homework assignments. This approach is exemplified by Marion County, Florida , where public schools implemented a no-homework policy for elementary students. Instead, they are encouraged to read nightly for 20 minutes . Superintendent Heidi Maier’s decision was influenced by research showing that while homework offers minimal benefit to young students, regular reading significantly boosts their learning. For book recommendations tailored to middle school students, take a look at our specially curated article .

Ideas for Minimizing Homework

  • Limiting Homework Quantity: Adhering to guidelines like the “ 10-minute rule ” (10 minutes of homework per grade level per night) can help ensure that homework does not become overwhelming.
  • Quality Over Quantity: Focus on assigning meaningful homework that is directly relevant to what is being taught in class, ensuring it adds value to students’ learning.
  • Homework Menus: Offering students a choice of assignments can cater to diverse learning styles and interests, making homework more engaging and personalized.
  • Integrating Technology: Utilizing educational apps and online platforms can make homework more interactive and enjoyable, while also providing immediate feedback to students. To gain deeper insights into the role of technology in learning environments, explore our articles discussing the benefits of incorporating technology in classrooms and a comprehensive list of educational VR apps . These resources will provide you with valuable information on how technology can enhance the educational experience.

For teachers who are not ready to fully eliminate homework, these strategies offer a compromise, ensuring that homework supports rather than hinders student learning. By focusing on quality, relevance, and student engagement, educators can transform homework from a chore into a meaningful component of education that genuinely contributes to students’ academic growth and personal development. In this way, we can move towards a more balanced and student-centric approach to learning, both in and out of the classroom.

Useful Resources

  • Is homework a good idea or not? by BBC
  • The Great Homework Debate: What’s Getting Lost in the Hype
  • Alternative Homework Ideas

The evidence and arguments presented in the discussion of why students should not have homework call for a significant shift in homework practices. It’s time for educators and policymakers to rethink and reformulate homework strategies, focusing on enhancing the quality, relevance, and balance of assignments. By doing so, we can create a more equitable, effective, and student-friendly educational environment that fosters learning, well-being, and holistic development.

  • “Here’s what an education expert says about that viral ‘no-homework’ policy”, Insider
  • “John Hattie on BBC Radio 4: Homework in primary school has an effect of zero”, Visible Learning
  • HowtoLearn.com
  • “Time Spent On Homework Statistics [Fresh Research]”, Gitnux
  • “Stress in America”, American Psychological Association (APA)
  • “Homework hurts high-achieving students, study says”, The Washington Post
  • “National Sleep Foundation’s updated sleep duration recommendations: final report”, National Library of Medicine
  • “A multi-method exploratory study of stress, coping, and substance use among high school youth in private schools”, Frontiers
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  • “The digital divide has left millions of school kids behind”, CNET
  • “The Digital Divide: What It Is, and What’s Being Done to Close It”, Investopedia
  • “COVID-19 exposed the digital divide. Here’s how we can close it”, World Economic Forum
  • “PBS NewsHour: Biggest Predictor of College Success is Family Income”, America’s Promise Alliance
  • “Homework and Family Stress: With Consideration of Parents’ Self Confidence, Educational Level, and Cultural Background”, Taylor & Francis Online
  • “What Do You Mean My Kid Doesn’t Have Homework?”, EducationWeek
  • “Excerpt From The Case Against Homework”, Penguin Random House Canada
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  • “The Nation’s Report Card: A First Look: 2013 Mathematics and Reading”, National Center for Education Statistics
  • “Battles Over Homework: Advice For Parents”, Psychology Today
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  • “ Breaking the Homework Habit”, Education World
  • “Testing a model of school learning: Direct and indirect effects on academic achievement”, ScienceDirect
  • “National Differences, Global Similarities: World Culture and the Future of Schooling”, Stanford University Press
  • “When school goes home: Some problems in the organization of homework”, APA PsycNet
  • “Is homework a necessary evil?”, APA PsycNet
  • “Epidemic of copying homework catalyzed by technology”, Redwood Bark
  • “High-Tech Cheating Abounds, and Professors Bear Some Blame”, The Chronicle of Higher Education
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  • “Kids who get moving may also get better grades”, Reuters
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  • “Encouraging Students to Read: Tips for High School Teachers”, wgu.edu
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The Homework Debate: The Case Against Homework

This post has been updated as of December 2017.

It’s not uncommon to hear students, parents, and even some teachers always complaining about homework. Why, then, is homework an inescapable part of the student experience? Worksheets, busy work, and reading assignments continue to be a mainstay of students’ evenings.

Whether from habit or comparison with out-of-class work time in other nations, our students are getting homework and, according to some of them, a LOT of it. Educators and policy makers must ask themselves—does assigning homework pay off?

Is there evidence that homework benefits students younger than high school?

The Scholastic article Is Homework Bad? references Alfie Kohn’s book The Homework Myth: Why Our Kids Get Too Much of a Bad Thing , in which he says, “There is no evidence to demonstrate that homework benefits students below high school age.”

The article goes on to note that those who oppose homework focus on the drawbacks of significant time spent on homework, identifying one major negative as homework’s intrusion into family time. They also point out that opponents believe schools have decided homework is necessary and thus assign it simply to assign some kind of homework, not because doing the work meets specifically-identified student needs.

“Busy work” does not help students learn

Students and parents appear to carry similar critiques of homework, specifically regarding assignments identified as busy work—long sheets of repetitive math problems, word searches, or reading logs seemingly designed to make children dislike books.

When asked how homework can negatively affect children, Nancy Kalish, author of The Case Against Homework: How Homework is Hurting Our Children and What We Can Do About It , says that many homework assignments are “simply busy work” that makes learning “a chore rather than a positive, constructive experience.”

Commenters on the piece, both parents and students, tended to agree. One student shared that on occasion they spent more time on homework than at school, while another commenter pointed out that, “We don’t give slow-working children a longer school day, but we consistently give them a longer homework day.”

Without feedback, homework is ineffective

The efficacy of the homework identified by Kalish has been studied by policy researchers as well. Gerald LeTendre, of Penn State’s Education Policy Studies department points out that the shotgun approach to homework, when students all receive the same photocopied assignment which is then checked as complete rather than discussed individually with the student, is “not very effective.”  He goes on to say that, “If there’s no feedback and no monitoring, the homework is probably not effective.”

Researchers from the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia had similar findings in their study, “ When Is Homework Worth The Time ?” According to UVAToday, these researchers reported no “substantive difference” in the grades of students related to homework completion.

As researcher Adam Maltese noted, “Our results hint that maybe homework is not being used as well as it could be.” The report further suggested that while not all homework is bad, the type and quality of assignments and their differentiation to specific learners appears to be an important point of future research.

If homework is assigned, it should heighten understanding of the subject

The Curry School of Education report did find a positive association between standardized test performance and time spent on homework, but standardized test performance shouldn’t be the end goal of assignments—a heightened understanding and capability with the content material should.

As such, it is important that if/when teachers assign homework assignments, it is done thoughtfully and carefully—and respectful of the maximum times suggested by the National Education Association, about 10 minutes per night starting in the first grade, with an additional 10 minutes per year after.

Continue reading — The Homework Debate: How Homework Benefits Students

Monica Fuglei is a graduate of the University of Nebraska in Omaha and a current adjunct faculty member of Arapahoe Community College in Colorado, where she teaches composition and creative writing.

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446+ Homework Quotes That Speak Your Student Struggles! (Images)

Dive into the world of education, late-night study sessions, and the ongoing challenge of managing time with our look at Homework Quotes.

This article is a handpicked collection of thoughts, humor, and wisdom about the shared experience of homework, made for those looking for quotes that capture the ups and downs of academic life.

Whether you’re a student seeking relatable words or someone reminiscing about the days of assignments and deadlines, these Homework Quotes cover a range of feelings associated with homework.

Join us on this journey through clever observations, motivational remarks, and maybe a bit of sarcasm as we explore different perspectives on the age-old task of dealing with homework.

Whether you find comfort, laughter, or inspiration, these quotes are here to connect with your academic journey.

Table of Contents

Homework Quotes

“Homework is not an option. My bed is sending out serious nap rays. I can’t help myself. The fluffy pillows and warm comforter are more powerful than I am. I have no choice but to snuggle under the covers.” – Janice Hardy

“Homework is a compromise between teachers and students. Students hate it; teachers love it. So, in the interest of harmony, let’s compromise: students should complete their homework with the same enthusiasm teachers use to assign it.” – Melanie White

“Homework is not about getting it done, it’s about getting it right.” – Neil Gaiman

“Homework is not a choice; it’s a responsibility. To succeed, you have to prioritize your tasks and complete them in order of importance.” – Jennifer Woo

“Homework is the key to academic success. It’s not just a task; it’s a journey toward knowledge and self-improvement.” – Tonya Hurley

“Homework is like a second job, but without the paycheck. However, the rewards of knowledge and success are priceless.” – Dana Bowman

“Homework teaches us that life is full of challenges. It’s not about avoiding them but facing them head-on and conquering them.” – Rosalind Wiseman

“Homework is the bridge that connects classroom learning with real-world application. It’s the path to mastery and success.” – Sara Shepard

“Homework is the practice that leads to perfection. Embrace the challenges, for they are the stepping stones to excellence.” – Richelle E. Goodrich

“Homework is not a punishment; it’s an opportunity to showcase your dedication to learning and growth.” – Andy Weir

“Homework is the engine that powers the train of education. Without it, the journey may be slow, but with it, you’ll reach your destination successfully.” – Nicholas Sparks

“Homework is the compass that guides us through the maze of knowledge, helping us navigate the twists and turns of academic life.” – Shannon Hale

“Homework is not a burden; it’s a gift. It offers the chance to expand your mind and explore the boundless realms of understanding.” – Lemony Snicket

“Homework is the silent partner in the journey of education, working tirelessly behind the scenes to ensure your success.” – Khaled Hosseini

“Homework is the blueprint for success. The more carefully you construct it, the sturdier your foundation for future achievements.” – Veronica Roth

“Homework is the rehearsal for the grand performance of life. The more you practice, the more confident and skilled you become.” – Jodi Picoult

“Homework is not just about completing assignments; it’s about cultivating a disciplined mind and a tenacious spirit.” – Alyson Noel

“Homework is the training ground for resilience and perseverance. Embrace the challenges, for they are the sculptors of your character.” – John Green

“Homework is the architect of success, designing the structure of knowledge that will support your dreams and aspirations.” – J.K. Rowling

“Homework is the investment you make in your own future. The more you put in, the greater the returns.” – Rachel Cohn

“Homework is the compass that points toward success. It may seem challenging, but the rewards are worth the journey.” – Cassandra Clare

“Homework is the seed that, when nurtured, blossoms into the tree of wisdom. Water it with diligence, and you’ll reap a bountiful harvest.” – Lisa Mangum

“Homework is the map that guides you through the uncharted territory of knowledge, helping you discover new realms of understanding.” – Libba Bray

“Homework is the path to mastery. Each assignment is a stepping stone, leading you closer to the peak of academic excellence.” – Lauren Oliver

“Homework is the sculptor’s chisel, shaping your intellect and carving out the masterpiece of your education.” – Kiera Cass

“Homework is not just a task; it’s a journey. Each assignment is a step forward, propelling you toward the summit of success.” – Marissa Meyer

“Homework is the currency of success. The more you invest, the richer your academic portfolio becomes.” – Gayle Forman

“Homework is the bridge between classroom learning and real-world application. It transforms knowledge into practical skills.” – Tahereh Mafi

“Homework is the fuel that powers the engine of academic achievement. Without it, the journey would come to a halt.” – Cecily von Ziegesar

“Homework is the rehearsal for life’s performance. The more you practice, the more confident and skilled you become on the grand stage of success.” – Meg Cabot

Famous Homework Quotes

“Homework is the price we pay for success. It may seem steep, but the dividends it yields are immeasurable.” – Robin Sharma

“Homework is not just an academic task; it’s a character-building exercise that shapes you into a resilient and disciplined individual.” – Stephen King

“Homework is the compass that guides us through the labyrinth of learning, helping us find our way to enlightenment.” – Haruki Murakami

“Homework is the silent conductor orchestrating the symphony of education. Each note played contributes to the masterpiece of knowledge.” – Maya Angelou

“Homework is the investment in human capital. The more you put in, the brighter the future becomes.” – Condoleezza Rice

“Homework is the gym for the mind. The more you exercise it, the stronger and more resilient it becomes.” – Malcolm Gladwell

“Homework is the roadmap to success, providing the directions to navigate the challenging terrain of education.” – Albert Einstein

“Homework is the cornerstone of achievement. It builds the foundation upon which your dreams and aspirations can stand tall.” – Oprah Winfrey

“Homework is the rehearsal for life’s challenges. Each assignment prepares you for the roles you’ll play on the stage of success.” – Bill Gates

“Homework is the key that unlocks the doors of knowledge, revealing the vast treasures that await those who seek understanding.” – Mae Jemison

“Homework is the bridge between potential and achievement. It connects the dots of learning, creating a pathway to success.” – Elon Musk

“Homework is not a burden; it’s an opportunity. It’s a chance to prove to yourself what you’re capable of achieving.” – Michelle Obama

“Homework is the sculptor’s tool, carving out the intricate details of your intellect and shaping the masterpiece of your education.” – Vincent Van Gogh

“Homework is the navigator on the ship of education, guiding you through the storms and helping you reach the shores of knowledge.” – Maya Angelou

“Homework is the compass that points you in the right direction. Embrace the journey, for it leads to the destination of success.” – Walt Disney

“Homework is not just a task; it’s a commitment to personal growth and intellectual development.” – Sheryl Sandberg

“Homework is the architect’s blueprint, designing the structure of your education and shaping the building blocks of your future.” – Frank Lloyd Wright

“Homework is the currency of success. Each assignment is a valuable coin that contributes to the wealth of your knowledge.” – Warren Buffett

“Homework is the crucible where knowledge is refined and intellect is forged. It’s the fire that tempers the steel of your education.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Homework is the alchemist’s potion, transforming raw information into the gold of wisdom. Stir it with diligence, and you’ll discover the elixir of success.” – Paulo Coelho

“Homework is the silent mentor, guiding you through the intricacies of learning and molding you into a well-rounded individual.” – Benjamin Franklin

“Homework is the GPS of education, helping you navigate the twists and turns of academic challenges and guiding you towards your destination of knowledge.” – Stephen Hawking

“Homework is the compass that keeps you on the right path. It may seem tedious, but it ensures you stay on course toward your goals.” – Margaret Mead

“Homework is the silent partner in your educational journey, working behind the scenes to ensure your success in the spotlight of life.” – Thomas Edison

“Homework is the garden where the seeds of knowledge are planted. Nurture it with care, and you’ll reap a bountiful harvest of wisdom.” – Eleanor Roosevelt

“Homework is the passport to the future. Stamp it with dedication, and it will carry you to the destinations of success.” – Mark Twain

“Homework is the sculptor’s chisel, shaping your intellect and carving out the masterpiece of your education.” – Plato

“Homework is the compass that points you in the right direction. Embrace the journey, for it leads to the destination of success.” – Nelson Mandela

“Homework is the silent partner in your educational journey, working behind the scenes to ensure your success in the spotlight of life.” – Rosa Parks

“Homework is the garden where the seeds of knowledge are planted. Nurture it with care, and you’ll reap a bountiful harvest of wisdom.” – Winston Churchill

Funny Homework Quotes

“Homework is like a math problem – you’re not sure why, but somehow it always seems to involve trains leaving stations at different speeds.” – Bill Watterson

“Homework is nature’s way of telling you that you have too much free time during the day.” – Mark Twain

“Homework is a conspiracy between teachers and the secret society of parents to keep kids busy and prevent them from taking over the world.” – Anonymous

“Homework: because 7 hours of school wasn’t enough punishment.” – Anonymous

“Homework is a bit like a dinosaur – it’s big, it’s scary, and you’re probably better off running away from it.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the only thing on Earth that doesn’t follow the laws of physics. It expands to fill the time available for its completion.” – C. Northcote Parkinson

“Homework is like a monster with a thousand eyes. The more you try to escape it, the more it seems to be watching you.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the only thing that kids give their 100% in, but somehow the answer is never right.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a vampire. It sucks the life out of you, and you can’t escape until it’s finished.” – Anonymous

“Homework is a never-ending story, and the sequel is due tomorrow.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a black hole. Once you start, it’s hard to escape its gravitational pull.” – Anonymous

“Homework is proof that the universe has a sense of humor, and it’s not afraid to use it against you.” – Peter Doskoch

“Homework is like a horror movie. You know it’s going to be terrifying, but you still have to watch it.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a puzzle. You spend hours trying to figure it out, and when you finally do, it turns out you were missing a piece.” – Anonymous

“Homework is a lot like a shot of espresso – it’s bitter, it keeps you up at night, and you’re not sure if it’s really necessary.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad dream – you try to wake up, but it just keeps coming back.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad movie. You keep waiting for it to get better, but it just never does.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a diet. You know you should do it, but the temptation to avoid it is just too strong.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a fine wine. It gets better with age, and by ‘better,’ I mean more challenging.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a roller coaster. It has its ups and downs, and by the end, you just want to get off.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad date. It takes up too much of your time, and you’re never really sure if it’s worth it.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad haircut. It might seem like a good idea at first, but you end up regretting it.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad breakup. You think you’re finally done with it, but it just keeps coming back to haunt you.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad habit. You know you should quit, but somehow you always find yourself going back for more.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad song. You can’t get it out of your head, no matter how hard you try.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad joke. You don’t really get it, but you’re expected to laugh along anyway.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad cold. It lingers on, making you miserable, and there’s no cure in sight.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad smell. You can’t escape it, and it always seems to linger longer than you want it to.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad game. You keep playing, hoping it will get better, but it just gets more frustrating.” – Anonymous

“Homework is like a bad dream. You try to wake up, but it just keeps dragging on.” – Anonymous

Homework Inspirational Quotes

“Homework is the compass guiding you through the vast landscape of knowledge, leading you to the treasures of wisdom.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the opportunity to turn effort into achievement, challenges into triumphs, and dreams into reality.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the training ground where champions are made, and success is not just a goal but a way of life.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the bridge between aspiration and accomplishment. With each task completed, you build your own path to success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the tool that hones your skills, sharpens your intellect, and forges the sword of knowledge that cuts through the challenges of life.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the canvas on which you paint the portrait of your academic journey, using the brushstrokes of dedication and perseverance.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the rehearsal for the symphony of success, with each note played contributing to the harmonious melody of achievement.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the blueprint for a brighter future, where each assignment shapes the foundation of your dreams.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the ladder to excellence, with each rung representing a step closer to the pinnacle of academic achievement.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the seed you plant today, hoping to reap the harvest of knowledge and success tomorrow.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the currency of education, and every completed assignment is a deposit into the bank of your intellectual wealth.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the path that leads from ignorance to enlightenment, with each assignment paving the way to a brighter and more knowledgeable future.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the journey of a thousand steps, each one taking you closer to the destination of wisdom and understanding.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the marathon of the mind, where every completed assignment is a step forward, bringing you closer to the finish line of success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the compass that points you toward the North Star of knowledge. Follow it diligently, and you’ll never lose your way.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the investment that pays dividends in the form of knowledge, skills, and the confidence to face any challenge.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the sculptor’s chisel, shaping your intellect and carving out the masterpiece of your education.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the journey where struggle transforms into strength, challenges into opportunities, and dreams into reality.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the key that unlocks the doors of understanding, allowing you to explore the vast corridors of knowledge.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the melody of learning, and each assignment adds a note to the symphony of your academic success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the canvas on which you paint the picture of your intellectual growth, using the vibrant colors of effort and determination.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the architect’s plan, designing the structure of your education and laying the foundation for a successful future.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the recipe for success, with each task adding an essential ingredient to the potion of knowledge.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the catalyst for transformation, turning potential into achievement, and dreams into reality.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the compass that guides you through the labyrinth of learning, ensuring you stay on the path to academic success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the currency of ambition. The more you invest, the wealthier you become in knowledge and understanding.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the foundation upon which your academic success is built. With each completed assignment, you strengthen that foundation.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the journey that transforms you from a student into a scholar, with each assignment adding to the pages of your academic story.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the mirror reflecting your commitment to learning. The more effort you put in, the clearer the reflection of success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the silent mentor, guiding you through the intricacies of learning and molding you into a well-rounded individual.” – Anonymous

Positive Quotes About Homework

“Homework is the path to knowledge, and each assignment is a stepping stone that brings you closer to the summit of academic success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive force that turns challenges into opportunities and transforms effort into accomplishment.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the canvas where you paint the masterpiece of your education, using the colors of dedication, persistence, and curiosity.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the garden of learning, and each task you complete is a bloom that adds beauty to the landscape of your education.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive echo of your commitment to excellence, resonating with the sound of achievement and success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive energy that fuels your academic journey, propelling you forward with each completed assignment.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive habit that cultivates discipline, resilience, and a thirst for knowledge, preparing you for a bright future.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive link between aspiration and accomplishment, connecting your dreams to the reality of success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive navigator on the ship of education, guiding you through the waves of challenges toward the shores of knowledge.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive workout for your mind, building intellectual muscles that empower you to tackle any academic challenge.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive puzzle that, once solved, reveals the picture of your academic prowess and intellectual capacity.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive investment in your own potential, with each completed task adding value to your intellectual portfolio.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive catalyst that sparks curiosity, fosters a love for learning, and ignites the flame of academic passion.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive bridge between theory and practice, transforming knowledge into skills and information into wisdom.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive map that guides you through the vast terrain of education, helping you navigate toward the destination of success.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive melody of learning, with each completed task adding a note to the symphony of your academic achievements.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive mirror reflecting your dedication, determination, and the bright potential within you.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive architect’s blueprint, designing the structure of your academic success and building a solid foundation for the future.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive path to mastery, where each assignment is a milestone marking your progress toward expertise and understanding.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive spark that ignites the fire of lifelong learning, turning every assignment into an opportunity for growth.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive sculptor’s tool, chiseling away the excess and revealing the masterpiece of your education.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive navigator, guiding you through the twists and turns of academic challenges toward the positive shores of knowledge.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive compass pointing towards success, guiding you through the academic journey with confidence and purpose.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive currency of education, with every completed task adding value to your intellectual wealth.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive garden of learning, where each task is a seed that, when nurtured, blossoms into the flowers of wisdom.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive mirror reflecting your commitment to excellence, resilience, and the continuous pursuit of knowledge.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive canvas on which you paint the portrait of your academic success, using the vibrant colors of dedication and perseverance.” – Anonymous

“Homework is the positive compass that guides you through the labyrinth of learning, ensuring you stay on the path to academic success.” – Anonymous

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August 16, 2021

Is it time to get rid of homework? Mental health experts weigh in

by Sara M Moniuszko

homework

It's no secret that kids hate homework. And as students grapple with an ongoing pandemic that has had a wide-range of mental health impacts, is it time schools start listening to their pleas over workloads?

Some teachers are turning to social media to take a stand against homework .

Tiktok user @misguided.teacher says he doesn't assign it because the "whole premise of homework is flawed."

For starters, he says he can't grade work on "even playing fields" when students' home environments can be vastly different.

"Even students who go home to a peaceful house, do they really want to spend their time on busy work? Because typically that's what a lot of homework is, it's busy work," he says in the video that has garnered 1.6 million likes. "You only get one year to be 7, you only got one year to be 10, you only get one year to be 16, 18."

Mental health experts agree heavy work loads have the potential do more harm than good for students, especially when taking into account the impacts of the pandemic. But they also say the answer may not be to eliminate homework altogether.

Emmy Kang, mental health counselor at Humantold, says studies have shown heavy workloads can be "detrimental" for students and cause a "big impact on their mental, physical and emotional health."

"More than half of students say that homework is their primary source of stress, and we know what stress can do on our bodies," she says, adding that staying up late to finish assignments also leads to disrupted sleep and exhaustion.

Cynthia Catchings, a licensed clinical social worker and therapist at Talkspace, says heavy workloads can also cause serious mental health problems in the long run, like anxiety and depression.

And for all the distress homework causes, it's not as useful as many may think, says Dr. Nicholas Kardaras, a psychologist and CEO of Omega Recovery treatment center.

"The research shows that there's really limited benefit of homework for elementary age students, that really the school work should be contained in the classroom," he says.

For older students, Kang says homework benefits plateau at about two hours per night.

"Most students, especially at these high-achieving schools, they're doing a minimum of three hours, and it's taking away time from their friends from their families, their extracurricular activities. And these are all very important things for a person's mental and emotional health."

Catchings, who also taught third to 12th graders for 12 years, says she's seen the positive effects of a no homework policy while working with students abroad.

"Not having homework was something that I always admired from the French students (and) the French schools, because that was helping the students to really have the time off and really disconnect from school ," she says.

The answer may not be to eliminate homework completely, but to be more mindful of the type of work students go home with, suggests Kang, who was a high-school teacher for 10 years.

"I don't think (we) should scrap homework, I think we should scrap meaningless, purposeless busy work-type homework. That's something that needs to be scrapped entirely," she says, encouraging teachers to be thoughtful and consider the amount of time it would take for students to complete assignments.

The pandemic made the conversation around homework more crucial

Mindfulness surrounding homework is especially important in the context of the last two years. Many students will be struggling with mental health issues that were brought on or worsened by the pandemic, making heavy workloads even harder to balance.

"COVID was just a disaster in terms of the lack of structure. Everything just deteriorated," Kardaras says, pointing to an increase in cognitive issues and decrease in attention spans among students. "School acts as an anchor for a lot of children, as a stabilizing force, and that disappeared."

But even if students transition back to the structure of in-person classes, Kardaras suspects students may still struggle after two school years of shifted schedules and disrupted sleeping habits.

"We've seen adults struggling to go back to in-person work environments from remote work environments. That effect is amplified with children because children have less resources to be able to cope with those transitions than adults do," he explains.

'Get organized' ahead of back-to-school

In order to make the transition back to in-person school easier, Kang encourages students to "get good sleep, exercise regularly (and) eat a healthy diet."

To help manage workloads, she suggests students "get organized."

"There's so much mental clutter up there when you're disorganized... sitting down and planning out their study schedules can really help manage their time," she says.

Breaking assignments up can also make things easier to tackle.

"I know that heavy workloads can be stressful, but if you sit down and you break down that studying into smaller chunks, they're much more manageable."

If workloads are still too much, Kang encourages students to advocate for themselves.

"They should tell their teachers when a homework assignment just took too much time or if it was too difficult for them to do on their own," she says. "It's good to speak up and ask those questions. Respectfully, of course, because these are your teachers. But still, I think sometimes teachers themselves need this feedback from their students."

©2021 USA Today Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Why more and more teachers are joining the anti-homework movement

The word homework doesn’t just elicit groans from students. Many veteran educators aren’t fans of it either.

Barbara Tollison, a high school English teacher with nearly four decades in the classroom, stopped assigning homework five years ago. In lieu of writing papers, she asks her 10th graders in San Marcos, California, to read more books before bed.

“For the kids who understand the information, additional practice is unnecessary,” she told TODAY Parents . “The kids who need more support are going to go home and not do it right. It's just going to confuse them more. They don’t have the understanding and they need guidance.”

Tollison is part of a growing movement that believes learners can thrive academically without homework. According to Alfie Kohn, author of “ The Homework Myth ,” there’s never a good excuse for making kids work a second shift of academics in elementary and middle school.

“In high school, it’s a little more nuanced,” Kohn told TODAY Parents . “Some research has found a tiny correlation between doing more homework and doing better on standardized tests . But No. 1, standardized tests are a lousy measure of learning. No. 2, the correlation is small. And No. 3, it doesn’t prove a causal relationship. In other words, just because the same kids who get more homework do a little better on tests, doesn’t mean the homework made that happen.”

Kohn noted that “newer, better” studies are showing that the downside of homework is just as profound in 16-year-olds as it is in 8-year-olds, in terms of causing causing anxiety, a loss of interest in learning and family conflict.

quotes against homework

Parents Is homework robbing your family of joy? You're not alone

“For my book, I interviewed high school teachers who completely stopped giving homework and there was no downside, it was all upside,” he shared.

“There just isn’t a good argument in favor of homework,” Kohn said.

Katie Sluiter, an 8th grade teacher in Michigan, couldn’t agree more. She believes that the bulk of instruction and support should happen in the classroom.

“What I realized early on in my career is that the kids who don’t need the practice are the only ones doing their homework,” Sluiter told TODAY Parents .

Sluiter added that homework is stressful and inequitable. Many children, especially those from lower-income families, have little chance of being successful with work being sent home.

“So many things are out of the student’s control, like the ability to have a quiet place to do homework,” Sluiter explained. “In my district, there are many parents that don’t speak any English, so they’re not going to be able to help with their child’s social studies homework. Some kids are responsible for watching their younger siblings after school.”

quotes against homework

Parents Too much homework? Study shows elementary kids get 3 times more than they should

Sluiter also doesn’t want to add “an extra pile of stress” to already over-scheduled lives.

“Middle school is hard enough without worrying, ‘Did I get my conjunctions sheet done?’” she said. “It’s ridiculous. It’s just too much. We need to let them be kids."

Kohn, who has written 14 books on parenting and education, previously told TODAY that moms and dads should speak up on behalf of their children.

"If your child's teacher never assigns homework, take a moment to thank them for doing what's in your child's best interest — and for acknowledging that families, not schools, ought to decide what happens during family time," he said. "If your child is getting homework, organize a bunch of parents to meet with the teacher and administrators — not to ask, 'Why so much?' but, given that the research says it's all pain and no gain, to ask, 'Why is there any?'"

Related video:

Rachel Paula Abrahamson is a lifestyle reporter who writes for the parenting, health and shop verticals. Her bylines have appeared in The New York Times, Good Housekeeping, Redbook, and elsewhere. Rachel lives in the Boston area with her husband and their two daughters. Follow her on Instagram .

Are You Down With or Done With Homework?

  • Posted January 17, 2012
  • By Lory Hough

Sign: Are you down with or done with homework?

The debate over how much schoolwork students should be doing at home has flared again, with one side saying it's too much, the other side saying in our competitive world, it's just not enough.

It was a move that doesn't happen very often in American public schools: The principal got rid of homework.

This past September, Stephanie Brant, principal of Gaithersburg Elementary School in Gaithersburg, Md., decided that instead of teachers sending kids home with math worksheets and spelling flash cards, students would instead go home and read. Every day for 30 minutes, more if they had time or the inclination, with parents or on their own.

"I knew this would be a big shift for my community," she says. But she also strongly believed it was a necessary one. Twenty-first-century learners, especially those in elementary school, need to think critically and understand their own learning — not spend night after night doing rote homework drills.

Brant's move may not be common, but she isn't alone in her questioning. The value of doing schoolwork at home has gone in and out of fashion in the United States among educators, policymakers, the media, and, more recently, parents. As far back as the late 1800s, with the rise of the Progressive Era, doctors such as Joseph Mayer Rice began pushing for a limit on what he called "mechanical homework," saying it caused childhood nervous conditions and eyestrain. Around that time, the then-influential Ladies Home Journal began publishing a series of anti-homework articles, stating that five hours of brain work a day was "the most we should ask of our children," and that homework was an intrusion on family life. In response, states like California passed laws abolishing homework for students under a certain age.

But, as is often the case with education, the tide eventually turned. After the Russians launched the Sputnik satellite in 1957, a space race emerged, and, writes Brian Gill in the journal Theory Into Practice, "The homework problem was reconceived as part of a national crisis; the U.S. was losing the Cold War because Russian children were smarter." Many earlier laws limiting homework were abolished, and the longterm trend toward less homework came to an end.

The debate re-emerged a decade later when parents of the late '60s and '70s argued that children should be free to play and explore — similar anti-homework wellness arguments echoed nearly a century earlier. By the early-1980s, however, the pendulum swung again with the publication of A Nation at Risk , which blamed poor education for a "rising tide of mediocrity." Students needed to work harder, the report said, and one way to do this was more homework.

For the most part, this pro-homework sentiment is still going strong today, in part because of mandatory testing and continued economic concerns about the nation's competitiveness. Many believe that today's students are falling behind their peers in places like Korea and Finland and are paying more attention to Angry Birds than to ancient Babylonia.

But there are also a growing number of Stephanie Brants out there, educators and parents who believe that students are stressed and missing out on valuable family time. Students, they say, particularly younger students who have seen a rise in the amount of take-home work and already put in a six- to nine-hour "work" day, need less, not more homework.

Who is right? Are students not working hard enough or is homework not working for them? Here's where the story gets a little tricky: It depends on whom you ask and what research you're looking at. As Cathy Vatterott, the author of Rethinking Homework , points out, "Homework has generated enough research so that a study can be found to support almost any position, as long as conflicting studies are ignored." Alfie Kohn, author of The Homework Myth and a strong believer in eliminating all homework, writes that, "The fact that there isn't anything close to unanimity among experts belies the widespread assumption that homework helps." At best, he says, homework shows only an association, not a causal relationship, with academic achievement. In other words, it's hard to tease out how homework is really affecting test scores and grades. Did one teacher give better homework than another? Was one teacher more effective in the classroom? Do certain students test better or just try harder?

"It is difficult to separate where the effect of classroom teaching ends," Vatterott writes, "and the effect of homework begins."

Putting research aside, however, much of the current debate over homework is focused less on how homework affects academic achievement and more on time. Parents in particular have been saying that the amount of time children spend in school, especially with afterschool programs, combined with the amount of homework given — as early as kindergarten — is leaving students with little time to run around, eat dinner with their families, or even get enough sleep.

Certainly, for some parents, homework is a way to stay connected to their children's learning. But for others, homework creates a tug-of-war between parents and children, says Liz Goodenough, M.A.T.'71, creator of a documentary called Where Do the Children Play?

"Ideally homework should be about taking something home, spending a few curious and interesting moments in which children might engage with parents, and then getting that project back to school — an organizational triumph," she says. "A nag-free activity could engage family time: Ask a parent about his or her own childhood. Interview siblings."

Illustration by Jessica Esch

Instead, as the authors of The Case Against Homework write, "Homework overload is turning many of us into the types of parents we never wanted to be: nags, bribers, and taskmasters."

Leslie Butchko saw it happen a few years ago when her son started sixth grade in the Santa Monica-Malibu (Calif.) United School District. She remembers him getting two to four hours of homework a night, plus weekend and vacation projects. He was overwhelmed and struggled to finish assignments, especially on nights when he also had an extracurricular activity.

"Ultimately, we felt compelled to have Bobby quit karate — he's a black belt — to allow more time for homework," she says. And then, with all of their attention focused on Bobby's homework, she and her husband started sending their youngest to his room so that Bobby could focus. "One day, my younger son gave us 15-minute coupons as a present for us to use to send him to play in the back room. … It was then that we realized there had to be something wrong with the amount of homework we were facing."

Butchko joined forces with another mother who was having similar struggles and ultimately helped get the homework policy in her district changed, limiting homework on weekends and holidays, setting time guidelines for daily homework, and broadening the definition of homework to include projects and studying for tests. As she told the school board at one meeting when the policy was first being discussed, "In closing, I just want to say that I had more free time at Harvard Law School than my son has in middle school, and that is not in the best interests of our children."

One barrier that Butchko had to overcome initially was convincing many teachers and parents that more homework doesn't necessarily equal rigor.

"Most of the parents that were against the homework policy felt that students need a large quantity of homework to prepare them for the rigorous AP classes in high school and to get them into Harvard," she says.

Stephanie Conklin, Ed.M.'06, sees this at Another Course to College, the Boston pilot school where she teaches math. "When a student is not completing [his or her] homework, parents usually are frustrated by this and agree with me that homework is an important part of their child's learning," she says.

As Timothy Jarman, Ed.M.'10, a ninth-grade English teacher at Eugene Ashley High School in Wilmington, N.C., says, "Parents think it is strange when their children are not assigned a substantial amount of homework."

That's because, writes Vatterott, in her chapter, "The Cult(ure) of Homework," the concept of homework "has become so engrained in U.S. culture that the word homework is part of the common vernacular."

These days, nightly homework is a given in American schools, writes Kohn.

"Homework isn't limited to those occasions when it seems appropriate and important. Most teachers and administrators aren't saying, 'It may be useful to do this particular project at home,'" he writes. "Rather, the point of departure seems to be, 'We've decided ahead of time that children will have to do something every night (or several times a week). … This commitment to the idea of homework in the abstract is accepted by the overwhelming majority of schools — public and private, elementary and secondary."

Brant had to confront this when she cut homework at Gaithersburg Elementary.

"A lot of my parents have this idea that homework is part of life. This is what I had to do when I was young," she says, and so, too, will our kids. "So I had to shift their thinking." She did this slowly, first by asking her teachers last year to really think about what they were sending home. And this year, in addition to forming a parent advisory group around the issue, she also holds events to answer questions.

Still, not everyone is convinced that homework as a given is a bad thing. "Any pursuit of excellence, be it in sports, the arts, or academics, requires hard work. That our culture finds it okay for kids to spend hours a day in a sport but not equal time on academics is part of the problem," wrote one pro-homework parent on the blog for the documentary Race to Nowhere , which looks at the stress American students are under. "Homework has always been an issue for parents and children. It is now and it was 20 years ago. I think when people decide to have children that it is their responsibility to educate them," wrote another.

And part of educating them, some believe, is helping them develop skills they will eventually need in adulthood. "Homework can help students develop study skills that will be of value even after they leave school," reads a publication on the U.S. Department of Education website called Homework Tips for Parents. "It can teach them that learning takes place anywhere, not just in the classroom. … It can foster positive character traits such as independence and responsibility. Homework can teach children how to manage time."

Annie Brown, Ed.M.'01, feels this is particularly critical at less affluent schools like the ones she has worked at in Boston, Cambridge, Mass., and Los Angeles as a literacy coach.

"It feels important that my students do homework because they will ultimately be competing for college placement and jobs with students who have done homework and have developed a work ethic," she says. "Also it will get them ready for independently taking responsibility for their learning, which will need to happen for them to go to college."

The problem with this thinking, writes Vatterott, is that homework becomes a way to practice being a worker.

"Which begs the question," she writes. "Is our job as educators to produce learners or workers?"

Slate magazine editor Emily Bazelon, in a piece about homework, says this makes no sense for younger kids.

"Why should we think that practicing homework in first grade will make you better at doing it in middle school?" she writes. "Doesn't the opposite seem equally plausible: that it's counterproductive to ask children to sit down and work at night before they're developmentally ready because you'll just make them tired and cross?"

Kohn writes in the American School Board Journal that this "premature exposure" to practices like homework (and sit-and-listen lessons and tests) "are clearly a bad match for younger children and of questionable value at any age." He calls it BGUTI: Better Get Used to It. "The logic here is that we have to prepare you for the bad things that are going to be done to you later … by doing them to you now."

According to a recent University of Michigan study, daily homework for six- to eight-year-olds increased on average from about 8 minutes in 1981 to 22 minutes in 2003. A review of research by Duke University Professor Harris Cooper found that for elementary school students, "the average correlation between time spent on homework and achievement … hovered around zero."

So should homework be eliminated? Of course not, say many Ed School graduates who are teaching. Not only would students not have time for essays and long projects, but also teachers would not be able to get all students to grade level or to cover critical material, says Brett Pangburn, Ed.M.'06, a sixth-grade English teacher at Excel Academy Charter School in Boston. Still, he says, homework has to be relevant.

"Kids need to practice the skills being taught in class, especially where, like the kids I teach at Excel, they are behind and need to catch up," he says. "Our results at Excel have demonstrated that kids can catch up and view themselves as in control of their academic futures, but this requires hard work, and homework is a part of it."

Ed School Professor Howard Gardner basically agrees.

"America and Americans lurch between too little homework in many of our schools to an excess of homework in our most competitive environments — Li'l Abner vs. Tiger Mother," he says. "Neither approach makes sense. Homework should build on what happens in class, consolidating skills and helping students to answer new questions."

So how can schools come to a happy medium, a way that allows teachers to cover everything they need while not overwhelming students? Conklin says she often gives online math assignments that act as labs and students have two or three days to complete them, including some in-class time. Students at Pangburn's school have a 50-minute silent period during regular school hours where homework can be started, and where teachers pull individual or small groups of students aside for tutoring, often on that night's homework. Afterschool homework clubs can help.

Some schools and districts have adapted time limits rather than nix homework completely, with the 10-minute per grade rule being the standard — 10 minutes a night for first-graders, 30 minutes for third-graders, and so on. (This remedy, however, is often met with mixed results since not all students work at the same pace.) Other schools offer an extended day that allows teachers to cover more material in school, in turn requiring fewer take-home assignments. And for others, like Stephanie Brant's elementary school in Maryland, more reading with a few targeted project assignments has been the answer.

"The routine of reading is so much more important than the routine of homework," she says. "Let's have kids reflect. You can still have the routine and you can still have your workspace, but now it's for reading. I often say to parents, if we can put a man on the moon, we can put a man or woman on Mars and that person is now a second-grader. We don't know what skills that person will need. At the end of the day, we have to feel confident that we're giving them something they can use on Mars."

Read a January 2014 update.

Homework Policy Still Going Strong

Illustration by Jessica Esch

Ed. Magazine

The magazine of the Harvard Graduate School of Education

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quotes against homework

Don't let anyone tell you that standardized tests are not accurate measures. The truth of the matter is they offer a remarkably precise method for gauging the size of the houses near the school where the test was administered.

Children learn how to make good decisions by making decisions, not by following directions.

Educational success should be measured by how strong your desire is to keep learning.

If unconditional love and genuine enthusiasm are present, praise isn't necessary. If they're absent, praise won't help.

Children, after all, are not just adults-in-the-making. They are people whose current needs and rights and experiences must be taken seriously.

If a child is off-task...mayb e the problem is not the child...maybe it's the task.

In outstanding classrooms, teachers do more listening than talking, and students do more talking than listening. Terrific teachers often have teeth marks on their tongues.

Educators remind us that what counts in a classroom is not what the teacher teaches; it’s what the learner learns.

Saying you taught it but the student didn't learn it is like saying you sold it but the customer didn't buy it.

The difference between a good educator and a great educator is that the former figures out how to work within the constraints of traditional policies and accepted assumptions, whereas the latter figures out how to change whatever gets in the way of doing right by kids. 'But we've always...', 'But the parents will never...', 'But we can't be the only school in the area to...' - all such protestations are unpersuasive to great educators. If research and common sense argue for doing things differently, then the question isn't whether to change course but how to make it happen.

We can't value only what is easy to measure; measurable outcomes may be the least important results of learning.

If I offered you a thousand dollars to take off your shoes, you'd very likely accept--and then I could triumphantly announce that 'rewards work.' But as with punishments, they can never help someone develop a *commitment* to a task or action, a reason to keep doing it when there's no longer a payoff.

In a word, learning is decontextualized. We break ideas down into tiny pieces that bear no relation to the whole. We give students a brick of information, followed by another brick, followed by another brick, until they are graduated, at which point we assume they have a house. What they have is a pile of bricks, and they don't have it for long.

Social psychology has found the more you reward people for doing something, the more they tend to lose interest in whatever they had to do to get the reward.

Those who know they're valued irrespective of their accomplishments often end up accomplishing quite a lot. It's the experience of being accepted without conditions that helps people develop a healthy confidence in themselves, a belief that it's safe to take risks and try new things.

Whoever said there's no such thing as a stupid question never looked carefully at a standardized test.

The race to win turns us all into losers.

To be well-educated is to have the desire as well as the means to make sure that learning never ends.

Punishment and reward proceed from basically the same psychological model, one that conceives of motivation as nothing more than the manipulation of behavior.

People will typically be more enthusiastic where they feel a sense of belonging and see themselves as part of a community than they will in a workplace in which each person is left to his own devices

How we feel about our kids isn't as important as how they experience those feelings and how they regard the way we treat them.

Each time I visit such a classroom, where the teacher is more interested in creating a democratic community than in maintaining her position of authority, I’m convinced all over again that moving away from consequences and rewards isn’t just realistic - it’s the best way to help kids grow into good learners and good people.

We have so much to cover and so little time to cover it. Howard Gardner refers to curriculum coverage as the single greatest enemy of understanding. Think instead about ideas to be discovered.

Punishments and rewards are two sides of the same coin and that coin doesn't buy you much.

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127+ Best Homework Quotes: Exclusive Selection

Homework teaches students to work independently and develop self-discipline. Profoundly inspirational homework quotes will fire up your brain and encourage you to look at life differently while making you laugh.

If you’re searching for motivational quotes for education and greatest teacher quotes that perfectly capture what you’d like to say or just want to feel inspired yourself, browse through an amazing collection of top ignorance quotes , popular class quotes and inspiring senior quotes .

Famous Homework Quotes

One of life’s most painful moments comes when we must admit that we didn’t do our homework, that we are not prepared. — Merlin Olsen

Nothing is more powerful for your future than being a gatherer of good ideas and information. That’s called doing your homework. — Jim Rohn

You have got to pay attention, you have got to study and you have to do your homework. You have to score higher than everybody else. Otherwise, there is always somebody there waiting to take your place. — Daisy Fuentes

Inspiration comes in the middle of the night when you should be doing homework. — Amy Lee

I’m just living my life. I’m incredibly disciplined and I work incredibly hard. I show up for things on time, I do my homework, and I work my ass off. I’ve had a lot of luck, but I work really, really hard. — Anna Paquin

By providing every student with a quality education, and the materials they need for class and to do their homework, we can help students from all backgrounds learn and thrive. — London Breed

I put so much pressure on myself to be perfect. Between homework and sports and drama and being social, I slept about four hours a night through high school and college. — Allison Williams

Having mid-week games is great. It’s almost like the pros. With three games you need to get your rest and get your fluids. You also need to make sure you get your homework done, because you don’t have every night free until Friday. — Tim Cook

It is not the end, just the beginning, but the homework is enormous, … The summit itself ended, but many, many meetings, action and partnership programs must start. — Yoshio Utsumi

Homework is a best work,but if human hate it its a worst work. — Vidhya Vijay

No kid should be getting three or four hours of homework a night. There’s no breathing time, there’s no family time, there are just extracurriculars and homework and then go to bed. — Ross W. Greene

Homework should be a swear word. Every time teachers say it, they should have to put money in a jar and then, when there’s enough, they need to buy all the kids ice cream. — Rachel Inbar

I’ve got a lot of homework to do, and none of it has anything to do with school. — Travis Thrasher

I also want to thank the person who picked up litter and put it in the litter basket. I want to thank the parents who help their children with homework every night and I want to thank the person who goes by to check on a neighbor, — James Perkins

We turn off the TV, video games and computer – except for homework – during the week. The TV’s reserved for Friday night, Saturday and Sunday just because that’s the time to do homework, and it makes it that much less chaotic in our house. — Candace Cameron Bure

A lot of actors talk about doing their homework, but very few of them do it. — Tony Scott

I wait till the last minute to do lyrics. I seem to work best that way – bummed out and under pressure. I often don’t do my homework. But I’ll always walk that extra mile. — Steven Tyler

The best thing about baseball is there’s no homework. — Dan Quisenberry

We’ve had a lot more teens hanging out at the new library, … The kids really like the new computers and a lot of them come here to hang out with their friends and do their homework after school. — American Library

We do everything together. At first, it was mostly wrestling but then we’d hang out together and do our homework together. — Alex McKinney

‘Grey Gardens’ consumed my life for over two and a half years. It really takes its toll on the family. I’m not there to tuck them in, help them with homework and eat dinner with them. When I work on a show, I only have about 20 minutes a day with my family. — Christine Ebersole

What I know is that if I was asked to teach mathematics in French for a week to young kids, I would do my homework and I think I could do a decent job. I don’t think a degree in education would make me a better teacher. I sometimes teach in college. I don’t teach for long periods of time, but I give workshops and I think I can communicate stuff. So, it’s about communicating. — Philippe Falardeau

We have been very grateful of the support from Spain and the European Union but we also feel we have to do our homework ourselves and not only trust our friends but also trust ourselves. — Per Stig

The deaf culture is portrayed very accurately on ‘Switched at Birth’ because the writers did the opposite of the norm. They did their homework before portraying anything on television. — Sean Berdy

What didn’t get done until 10 or 10:30, didn’t get done until the next day. It teaches you to manage your time. Class is from this time to this time and I can do homework from this time to that time. — A.J. Ellison

Jeremy is a player we did our homework on. He’s a defender, but is actually a converted forward. There are a lot of things we liked about him. — Dave Sarachan

Parents want to know things like how much homework their kids are doing, is it too much, what should they be reading, and at what level, — Piers Morgan

After your first job, is anyone asking you what your GPA was? No, they don’t care. They ask you: Are you a good leader? Do people follow you? Do you have integrity? Are you innovative? Do you solve problems? Somebody’s got to do that homework and redesign the educational system so that it can actually train people to be successful in life — Neil DeGrasse Tyson

We really wanted, as a committee, to do a thorough job and not jump into something. We looked at a lot of great candidates, and we did our homework on them. This committee was very, very thorough. — Randy Stange

I’m very homework-oriented – I’m a little Tracy Flick-ish. — Drew Barrymore

There has always been some cause for concern about that. But I feel we have done a very good job at doing our homework on these projects, and really, we hope the public will look at each one of these projects as they stand on there own merit. — Scot McNeley

I can get my homework done and hang out with my friends. — Mike Darnell

I will not go into a story unprepared. I will do my homework, and that’s something I learned at an early age. — Ed Bradley

Bird flu is totally under control, … The outbreak … occurred in one area and has been contained. Of course, we need to be careful, we need to do our homework well. — Recep Erdogan

Some adults feel intimidated by school, intimidated by the teacher, intimidated by the kind of homework their children are bringing home. It makes it difficult to be a part of things if you don’t have the skills you need. — Debra Conner

I definitely love ‘Camelot.’ It’s my favorite show. I’m a big ‘True Blood’ fan. I love ‘American Idol,’ and I love my girl J-Lo. The rest are my homework shows: ‘Forensic Files,’ ‘Dr. G. Medical Examiner,’ ‘The First 48.’ — Tamala Jones

Talent is important, and some background as well. This really is not beginner’s school. I want to work with people that have achieved a certain level and with whom i can easily communicate, which means you don’t have to do too much explaining so you won’t waste precious time. I don’t do much explaining during rehersals and we are just adjusting minor details. Simply, there is no space nor time for one to learn and each of them has to do their homework on time. That means practising, transitioning from a level to level. — Vlatko Stefanovski

I couldn’t do my homework if my room wasn’t clean. And it has carried on now that I am older, in a very freakish way. — Shaun White

Many people may be expecting a walking-talking clone of Arnold but I believe I’ve done my homework to the extent that the difference between us will be obvious. I’m playing a machine without emotion, but there’s an intensity I’m really working hard at hitting that I hope will come through to the audience and scare the crap out of them. — Robert Patrick

I liked the piano. I always liked playing. I just hated homework. — Mike Shinoda

She really did her homework on this one and read the analysts. — Holly Armstrong

We are reserving judgment. We have some homework to do. We are absolutely committed to help assure the future and viability of American Airlines. — Gregg Overman

I never studied art, but taught myself to draw by imitating the New Yorker cartoonists of that day, instead of doing my homework. — Bil Keane

Adrenaline kicks you in when you’re starving. That’s what nobody understands. Except for being hungry and cold, most of the time I feel like I can do anything. It gives me superhuman powers of smell and hearing. I can see what people are thinking, stay two steps ahead of them. I do enough homework to stay off the radar. Every night I climb thousands of steps into the sky to make me so exhausted that when I fall into bed, I don’t notice Cassie. Then suddenly it’s morning and I leap on the hamster wheel and it starts all over again. — Laurie Halse Anderson

He was a pro in the true sense. Tony did his homework and was always prepared. — Tom Higgins

Wednesday is an early release day, so kids will be out of school early and able to get their homework done. My staff is really excited about it. — Kristi Brown

Personally, the experience is amazing. To see where these kids live and grow up, it’s an experience all in itself to just talk to them individually and feel that you have made some kind of positive impact on their life. Most of them really are good kids stuck in a bad situation and we are there to try to bring out that motivation and determination in them to succeed in life. And the kids have started to warm up to us. They are starting to bring their homework more often and have gained more interest in what we have to share with them. — Ben Schaub

Many kids, particularly in lower-income families, would actually benefit from more structured activities. Plenty of children, especially teenagers, thrive on a busy schedule. But just as other trappings of modern childhood, from homework to technology, are subject to the law of diminishing returns, there is a danger of overscheduling the young. — Carl Honore

When my children were very young and I was working I had someone cooking for me. I don’t have a cook now, I haven’t had one for a number of years and I do it myself. But when they were all little it was hard to pay attention to everyone’s homework at the end of the day and make dinner. — Meryl Streep

Motivational Quotes About Homework

We have some tape on them from over the course of the year. We’ll have to do our homework now. — Jerry York

I’m learning skills I will use for the rest of my life by doing homework…procrastinating and negotiation. — Bill Watterson

One mother said that at 8 p.m. in her kitchen, she watched her son have a spirited exchange (online) with his classmates over the content of their homework — those things just can’t happen with paper and pencil. — Calvin Baker

There aren’t many rests in Jennifer’s concerto. She’s done her homework well and knows what works. But I have to be more like a long distance runner for this concerto, while orchestra playing is more like being a sprinter. — Peter Sullivan

It sounds so nerdy and pathetic, but what I always do on Sunday afternoon is bring my inbox down to zero, which is so sad. But e-mail has become like homework for adults. I’ll have 141 messages from people who will be offended if I don’t write back. — Mike Birbiglia

I don’t know anybody who said, ‘I love that teacher, he or she gave a really good homework set,’ or ‘Boy, that was the best class I ever took because those exams were awesome.’ That’s not what people want to talk about. It’s not what influences people in one profession or another. — Neil deGrasse Tyson

Here, homework is not a punishment. They really like coming to homework club. We want it to feel like home. — Amy Campbell

Writing an op-ed feels like I’m taking the SAT. It’s so hard. It feels like homework. And if it feels like homework, it just doesn’t get done. — Daniel Alarcon

We did an awful lot of homework. We actually started doing the homework going back to when the CBA was announced — recognizing that depending on what Nik decided to do that we might not have him here. — Jay Feaster

I felt extremely comfortable and at home on the set and actually I did homework about breaking down the scenes and often had shot lists in a rough way, but it was actually extremely spontaneous. Working with David Lynch-he is so spontaneous. — Joan Chen

Central’s size concerns me a little. The first I saw of them was (last Tuesday), and they are extremely talented. I didn’t see any weaknesses. Hopefully we’ll be able to do our homework and come up with some way to hang around and have a chance. — Jack Purtell

I study a lot. I pay attention to my homework. My parents have pushed academics all my life. When I get home, I do my homework before I do anything else. — Brianna Davis

Gabbe stepped forward. “Cam’s right. I’ve heard the Scale speak of these shifts.” She was tugging on the sleeves of her pale yellow cashmere cardigan as if she would never get warm. “They’re called timequakes. They are ripples in our reality. “And the closer he gets,” Roland added, with his usual understated wisdom, “the closer we are to the terminus of his Fall, the more frequent and the more severe the timequakes will become. Time is faltering in preparation for rewriting itself. “Like the way your computer freezes up more and more frequently before the hard drive crashes and erases your twenty-page term paper?” Miles said. Everyone looked at him in befuddlement. “What?” he asked. “Angels and demons don’t do homework? — Lauren Kate

The Public Health Minister who should have done her homework instead defended industry. But critical mass has been reached and many other campaigns have been initiated to eliminate aspartame. — Roger Williams

My parents were very firm about me always getting my homework done. — Chelsea Clinton

We’re going shine all day, all night. Please don’t be mad at us if we don’t do a little homework the next couple of weeks. — Joakim Noah

My earliest memories of my mom were of her multi-tasking – preparing dinner while checking on homework and housework; clearing the dinner plates while setting out bowls for breakfast; making sure we ate our breakfast while lining up bread, lunch meats, apples, and snacks assembly-line style so we could make our lunches. — Christine Pelosi

I compensate for big risks by always doing my homework and being well-prepared. I can take on larger risks by reducing the overall risk. — Donna Shalala

This is what I tell, especially young women, fight the big fights. Don’t fight the little fight … Be the first one in, be the last one out. Do your homework, choose your battles. Don’t whine, and don’t be the one who complains about everything. Fight the big fight. — Barbara Walters

My mother has been my mentor in my life. The number one attribute was discipline. To be on time to school, never miss a day at school, and then checking out homework and making sure I was doing it correctly and signing me up for lots of activities, extra tests and classes. — Ram Shriram

Players have to be nominated. We’ve done a ton of film-watching and studying. We were looking not only for good players, but also good citizens. I really feel good about our players. We’ve done good homework on them as far as who they are as players and also as young men. — Junior Graham

Sadly, I do my homework. I’ve a soft spot for the boring minutiae. I read the Charter of the United Nations before meeting with Kofi Annan. I read the Meltzer report, and then I’ll read C. Fred Bergsten’s defense of institutions like the World Bank and the I.M.F. It’s embarrassing to admit. — Bono

We have done our homework and the kids that we are bringing in are the kids that we want. Early in life when you are playing this building game you aren’t concerned about the ones you don’t get. You have to make sure the ones that you get are the ones that you want. — Howard Schnellenberger

We’ve lots of confidence in our game. Teams will have done their homework but our style is pretty hard to mark up if we do it properly. — Chris Jones

The more you do your homework, the more you’re free to be intuitive. But you’ve got to put the work in. — Edward Norton

Everybody talks about finding your voice. Do your homework and your voice will find you. — Branford Marsalis

Before I forget, here’s your homework. Where do you want me to put it? She pointed at the trash can. Right there would be fine. — Becca Fitzpatrick

He had done his homework on me. I like that. He was serious about me. — Alex Wood

My dad was fine about me doing modelling at 16 because I always said school was important to me. I always chose my jobs carefully so I wouldn’t have to take too much time off. It got harder toward the end with my A-levels; there were sleepless nights, and I was doing my homework on the plane coming home, but I pulled through. — Georgia May Jagger

My son and Marty’s son (assistant coach Marty Luc) come to every practice. My son Tommy is 9 and Marty’s son L.J. is 7. They can’t come on the court until their homework is done. Sometimes, when we have a late practice I’ll walk into my office and our players will be helping them with their homework. When we went on a trip to Pennsylvania over the holidays, our players would play with the kids in the pool or take them to the mall. Most high school kids don’t want to deal with that, but this group is special. My son’s favorite basketball player of all time is Desmond Wade. — Phil Colicchio

Homework Quotes For Students

I would have to say I was an excellent student. I was the type to always do my homework and study when I needed to. I never really partied or did anything like that. — Tia Mowry

You know, education, if you make the most of it, you study hard, you do your homework and you make an effort to be smart, you can do well. If you don’t, you get stuck in Iraq. — John F. Kerry

My homework was not stolen by a one-armed man — Nancy Cartwright

She’s so concentrated. She wasn’t going to let her homework slip. — Susan Reed

To me, the family was raising a child, not a golfer. The golf was just something he had an aptitude for. There was no mistake that the parents made the rules and kids followed the rules, but it wasn’t a harsh environment. It seemed quite normal. Homework came first, golf came second, end of story. — Rudy Duran

When it comes to major projects like this, we have to work through the county. The county actually has to borrow the money. We’ve determined the need. We’ve done our homework and the market analysis. The next step would be once we determine the best financing alternative, then we’ll take the necessary steps to acquire the financing. — David Deaton

From parents, we get hugs. We’ve had a lot of comments that homework time has been cut in half. — Becky Dyer

It’s very hypocritical to constantly say, ‘We want to keep our kids close,’ then send them home with so much homework that family time becomes nonexistent. — Marcia Gay Harden

We’re very pushed to have our grades on target so we can play. We have to make sure all our homework is done. — Sandra Ford

I think if you get asked to do this, then that’s called doing your homework, and I try and do it. — Mark Harmon

Just going home after school and not have to worry about anything just homework take a little nap, it’s fun. — Trevin Cowman

We’ve done our homework and we think we’re going to be good with the Charger. — John Fernandez

Many people who buy a car can’t afford what they’re getting into. They don’t do their homework and they don’t look at the alternatives. — Phil Edmonston

I’m a very research-, homework-oriented person. — Drew Barrymore

A single woman should only marry a man she can follow: Ladies if you are single, be very, very careful who you date and marry. Don’t just date a man who you can put up with, marry a man you can trust, you’ll follow his leadership, you’ll respect him, he’s saved, he’s godly. The last thing you want is some guy you don’t trust, he’s not wise, he doesn’t do his homework, he’s harsh, he’s inconsiderate, he’s immature, he’s a boy, you’re more his mother than you are his mate, Real danger … real danger … — Mark Driscoll

We’ve done a lot of homework this week and hopefully we can get everything right on the day. — Warren Gatland

If a student knows their parents are looking online, they’ll want to do their homework and stay in school because they’ll know Mom or Dad will see if they’ve skipped class. — James Davis

My mother worked at the telephone company during the day and sold Tupperware at night. Evenings, she took classes when she could at University of Maryland’s University College, bringing me along to do homework while she studied to get the degree she hoped would offer her and me greater opportunities. — Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

We recommend that teachers don’t give homework or have big projects due during testing. — Kandise Gilbertson

We were kids still in school and playing 24 hours. We would get off school and then go do our homework in the bar right across the street and then play there until one or two in the morning and then grab a few hours’ sleep before we went to school. Then the same thing repeated, man, over and over. — Henry Garza

We’re going to give you homework every single day. — Fernando Sanchez

They don’t really listen to speeches or talks. They absorb incrementally, through hours and hours of observation. The sad truth about divorce is that it’s hard to teach your kids about life unless you are living life with them: eating together, doing homework, watching Little League, driving them around endlessly, being bored with nothing to do, letting them listen while you do business, while you negotiate love and the frustrations and complications and rewards of living day in and out with your wife. Through this, they see how adults handle responsibility, honesty, commitment, jealousy, anger, professional pressures, and social interactions. Kids learn from whoever is around them the most. — Rob Lowe

I’d much rather do research on up and coming companies that have potential and take the risk. It boils down to doing a lot of homework and learning the underlying fundamentals. — Fred Walker

You don’t get rich off your day job, you get rich off your homework. — Daymond John

I was an anxious kid. I worried about getting homework finished, even back when homework didn’t count for anything. — Andrea Seigel

I actually had to do my homework to pass the time. It was horrible. — S. Walker

I wish it looked more like a car. But NASCAR has done their homework on it, and it doesn’t look like we got much of a choice. — Clint Bowyer

I didn’t make the cut. Clearly, Avery didn’t do his homework and check out what kind of shooter I was in college. — Del Harris

When I come home, it’s about my kid, who needs to eat, needs to do homework, and needs to get to basketball. I don’t have a lot of time to think about me. — Taraji P. Henson

I give myself homework when I have an audition. I give myself goals, and that’s how I check how I’m doing. It can be something simple like ‘listen,’ or ‘find your feet.’ And then afterward it’s an assessment, so in a way it’s not about booking the job or not. It’s about what I learned as an actor about that character. — Lupita Nyong’o

On school nights I practice 45 minutes to an hour, depending on how much homework I’ve got. — Colin Brown

We do our homework and we feel good about how we evaluated the players. — Trudi Lacey

I think the strength of our league and some of our non-conference games have prepared us for this opportunity. Obviously, we’ll try to do some homework here and collect some information on our opponent Friday and try to prepare ourselves. — Mark Johnson

The Chinese mom is not the helicopter mom. I would never do their homework for them. It’s all about: Take responsibility, don’t blame others. Be self-reliant. Never blame the teacher. — Amy Chua

He’s a big dude. You have to do your homework on where he wants to get to. I read it very well. You know where it’s coming from but it doesn’t always mean you’ll get it. — Adonal Foyle

People expect girls from good middle-class families to be smart but what they mean by smart for a girl is to have nice handwriting and a neat locker and to do her homework on time. They don’t expect ideas or much in the way of real thought. — Adelle Waldman

I’m a mom, a full-time mom when I’m not taping. I do the carpool thing, and bake the cookies, and do the homework. — Vanna White

Everyone has days where they don’t get their way, where you have to go to bed early or you have too much homework to do or you can’t eat the candy that you want or you miss your favorite TV show and, in those moments, you just want to tear the whole world down. — Alex Hirsch

Ricky was L but he’s home with the flu,Lizzie, our O, had some homework to do,Mitchell, E prob’ly got lost on the way,So I’m all of the love that could make it today. — Shel Silverstein

Whoever we play, it’s going to be tough because it’s two great teams. We just have to make sure we do our homework and go out there and try to execute. — Kobe Bryant

We bought some shares recently in a dot.com company that was absolutely annihilated after this recent rout, About.com ( BOUT : Research , Estimates ), which is the ninth-largest Web property of all Web properties. The stock dropped from 100 in late March, to a low of $21. This is a company with a real business model that had blowout first-quarter earnings. And they are actually going to turn a profit in 2001. Investors went from ‘everything Internet is good’, to the ‘everything Internet is bad’ mantra. So now you’ve got to do your homework and look at individual names and identify the business models that are valid. And I think this is one that can go back to its old high. — Dan Veru

Our audience is full of multitaskers. They’re IM-ing and talking on the phone and doing their homework and watching TV all at the same time. — Van Toffler

I don’t want to brag, but I do more homework on the course than any other announcer. I chart the greens to get all the breaks. I walk down into the greenside bunkers. I walk into the fairway bunkers to see whether a player can reach the green from them. — Johnny Miller

I think its important that kids have homework about every night, — Tom Turner

I’m a pretty disciplined investor and pretty disciplined buyer. I do my due diligence. I do my homework. I don’t waste money. — Bruce Rauner

I had amazing intellectual privilege as a kid. My mom taught me to read when I was two or three. When I was five, I read and wrote well enough to do my nine-year older brother’s homework in exchange for chocolate or cigarettes. By the time I was 10, I was reading Orwell, Tolstoy’s ‘War and Peace,’ and the Koran. I was reading comic books, too. — Chris Abani

Acting, and the privilege of being able to do it for a living, is so important to me. I don’t turn up and just hope for the best. I really fret about it. I do my homework; I prepare myself for the experience of playing a particular character. — Kate Winslet

The positive side of it is that we have managed to keep our intensive levels high to beat teams like Zimbabwe and Bangladesh. We have done our homework well. We respect teams and we do what we can do best, without thinking too much about the opponents. It is shown by our results. — Marvan Atapattu

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Student Opinion

Should We Get Rid of Homework?

Some educators are pushing to get rid of homework. Would that be a good thing?

quotes against homework

By Jeremy Engle and Michael Gonchar

Do you like doing homework? Do you think it has benefited you educationally?

Has homework ever helped you practice a difficult skill — in math, for example — until you mastered it? Has it helped you learn new concepts in history or science? Has it helped to teach you life skills, such as independence and responsibility? Or, have you had a more negative experience with homework? Does it stress you out, numb your brain from busywork or actually make you fall behind in your classes?

Should we get rid of homework?

In “ The Movement to End Homework Is Wrong, ” published in July, the Times Opinion writer Jay Caspian Kang argues that homework may be imperfect, but it still serves an important purpose in school. The essay begins:

Do students really need to do their homework? As a parent and a former teacher, I have been pondering this question for quite a long time. The teacher side of me can acknowledge that there were assignments I gave out to my students that probably had little to no academic value. But I also imagine that some of my students never would have done their basic reading if they hadn’t been trained to complete expected assignments, which would have made the task of teaching an English class nearly impossible. As a parent, I would rather my daughter not get stuck doing the sort of pointless homework I would occasionally assign, but I also think there’s a lot of value in saying, “Hey, a lot of work you’re going to end up doing in your life is pointless, so why not just get used to it?” I certainly am not the only person wondering about the value of homework. Recently, the sociologist Jessica McCrory Calarco and the mathematics education scholars Ilana Horn and Grace Chen published a paper, “ You Need to Be More Responsible: The Myth of Meritocracy and Teachers’ Accounts of Homework Inequalities .” They argued that while there’s some evidence that homework might help students learn, it also exacerbates inequalities and reinforces what they call the “meritocratic” narrative that says kids who do well in school do so because of “individual competence, effort and responsibility.” The authors believe this meritocratic narrative is a myth and that homework — math homework in particular — further entrenches the myth in the minds of teachers and their students. Calarco, Horn and Chen write, “Research has highlighted inequalities in students’ homework production and linked those inequalities to differences in students’ home lives and in the support students’ families can provide.”

Mr. Kang argues:

But there’s a defense of homework that doesn’t really have much to do with class mobility, equality or any sense of reinforcing the notion of meritocracy. It’s one that became quite clear to me when I was a teacher: Kids need to learn how to practice things. Homework, in many cases, is the only ritualized thing they have to do every day. Even if we could perfectly equalize opportunity in school and empower all students not to be encumbered by the weight of their socioeconomic status or ethnicity, I’m not sure what good it would do if the kids didn’t know how to do something relentlessly, over and over again, until they perfected it. Most teachers know that type of progress is very difficult to achieve inside the classroom, regardless of a student’s background, which is why, I imagine, Calarco, Horn and Chen found that most teachers weren’t thinking in a structural inequalities frame. Holistic ideas of education, in which learning is emphasized and students can explore concepts and ideas, are largely for the types of kids who don’t need to worry about class mobility. A defense of rote practice through homework might seem revanchist at this moment, but if we truly believe that schools should teach children lessons that fall outside the meritocracy, I can’t think of one that matters more than the simple satisfaction of mastering something that you were once bad at. That takes homework and the acknowledgment that sometimes a student can get a question wrong and, with proper instruction, eventually get it right.

Students, read the entire article, then tell us:

Should we get rid of homework? Why, or why not?

Is homework an outdated, ineffective or counterproductive tool for learning? Do you agree with the authors of the paper that homework is harmful and worsens inequalities that exist between students’ home circumstances?

Or do you agree with Mr. Kang that homework still has real educational value?

When you get home after school, how much homework will you do? Do you think the amount is appropriate, too much or too little? Is homework, including the projects and writing assignments you do at home, an important part of your learning experience? Or, in your opinion, is it not a good use of time? Explain.

In these letters to the editor , one reader makes a distinction between elementary school and high school:

Homework’s value is unclear for younger students. But by high school and college, homework is absolutely essential for any student who wishes to excel. There simply isn’t time to digest Dostoyevsky if you only ever read him in class.

What do you think? How much does grade level matter when discussing the value of homework?

Is there a way to make homework more effective?

If you were a teacher, would you assign homework? What kind of assignments would you give and why?

Want more writing prompts? You can find all of our questions in our Student Opinion column . Teachers, check out this guide to learn how you can incorporate them into your classroom.

Students 13 and older in the United States and Britain, and 16 and older elsewhere, are invited to comment. All comments are moderated by the Learning Network staff, but please keep in mind that once your comment is accepted, it will be made public.

Jeremy Engle joined The Learning Network as a staff editor in 2018 after spending more than 20 years as a classroom humanities and documentary-making teacher, professional developer and curriculum designer working with students and teachers across the country. More about Jeremy Engle

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15 Funny and Motivational Quotes about Homework

quotes against homework

When you think of homework, what comes to mind?

Maybe you think of worksheets and penmanship. Maybe you think of math drills and word problems. Maybe you think of busywork and time spent on unnecessary tasks. 

15 Funny and Motivational Quotes about Homework

Whatever you think of, we’re pretty sure most people don’t have a positive association with homework. For kids, it means extra school work when school hours are over and they just want to play. For parents, it means time spent supervising or coaxing after a long day at work. And, for teachers, it means hours of grading once the kids go home. 

But, in defense of homework, we think there are some good reasons it exists that make us want to change our negative mindset about it! Homework helps to build responsibility and teach kids to work independently. It develops good study habits in students and can boost self-esteem and develop confidence. Afterall, everyone loves to see that bright red “100%” or “good job!” at the top of their paper! Some homework can help to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. And it definitely teaches life lessons about time management.

At the end of the day, doing tasks that aren’t the most fun but are necessary is a part of life that teaches self-discipline. So here’s to buckling down, focusing hard, and knocking out your homework each day!

We’ve put together a list of 15 quotes about homework to help you look on the bright side of after-school learning. Some are motivational and some poke fun at what can seem like drudgery, but all of them are perfect for your letter board or other magnetic surface in your home or classroom!

  • H.O.M.E.W.O.R.K. Half My Energy is Wasted on Random Knowledge
  • Homework: the teacher's way of finding out how smart the parents are!
  • I don’t procrastinate. I save my homework until the last minute so that, by the time I do it, I’ll be older and wiser.
  • Study hard, do good, and the good life will follow.
  • Time flies when you’re avoiding homework.
  • Procrastination is the thief of time.
  • Stay positive. Work hard. Get it done.
  • Study as if you know nothing. Work as if you can solve everything.
  • That feeling when you can’t find the answers to your homework on Google
  • “Yay! Homework!” - no student ever
  • Alexa, do my homework.
  • The teacher can always tell when you did your homework on the bus.
  • “The most effective way to do it is to do it.” - Amelia Earhart
  • When in doubt, clear your desk, tie up your hair, grab a coffee, and just start.
  • Focus on being productive instead of busy.

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The case against homework

by: Leslie Crawford | Updated: June 12, 2023

Print article

The case against homework

When it comes to homework wars, many parents feel like they’re waging a losing battle against apathy or excuse making. But what if you happen to side with your kids about the pointlessness of their assignments?

Sara Bennett, the founder of Stop Homework and coauthor of The Case Against Homework (Crown, 2006), raised hell and ultimately changed the homework policy at her daughter’s school. GreatSchools talked to the lawyer turned reformer about preposterous projects and how children can learn to think for themselves.

GreatSchools: Why did you start an anti-homework campaign?

Sara Bennett: It started when my son brought homework home in the first grade. His first assignment was a reading log. He didn’t know how to read or write, so my husband and I filled in his log for him. At the first parent-teacher conference, the teacher said our son had to do the homework. I didn’t agree since he didn’t yet read.

I was an advocate in my work life, so it comes naturally to me to speak up. Whenever they’d talk about homework at my children’s school, I’d raise my hand and say, “Could you tell me why you’re doing this?”

Then in 2000 there was a big splash about a school in Piscataway, N.J., that stopped homework. And there was a book that came out around the same time, The End of Homework . This all gave me the factual basis that [homework] doesn’t make sense. It takes too much time, and it’s just busywork.

After that other parents came to me and said, “Can you help?” Also, my daughter, who is three years younger than my son, had more homework since she was caught up in No Child Left Behind. The standard became doing two hours a night. At that point, my husband and I were pretty radical about it and felt she didn’t need to do all this homework.

GreatSchools: Did that affect your daughter’s grades?

SB: Yes, she got pretty bad grades. But it was way, way, way too much homework. We had her do the background reading and not the assignments. But we did have her do the big projects so she wouldn’t be singled out.

GreatSchools: What about parents helping with homework?

SB: The first time I knew parents did projects for their kids was when my son was in third grade. They were supposed to make a little doll out of a clothespin that was representative of immigration. My son made the doll by himself.

I was riding my bike through the neighborhood and a parent said, “Hey, how’s your doll coming along?” When I asked, “What doll?” she answered, “Julian’s doll.” I told her that Julian [was] done with his doll. Then she told me that all the parents [were] making their children’s dolls.

It was unbelievable. When the dolls were displayed, my son’s was hidden in the back because it was the only one that looked like it didn’t belong in a museum. I went to the teacher and said, “Julian’s the only one who made his doll. I did third grade 30 years ago — I don’t need to now.” The teacher didn’t get it, but Julian did.

Both my children are artists. I think it’s because we never had our hands in their work [that] they continued to develop and are proud of their work.

GreatSchools: Dr. Harris Cooper’s synthesis of studies on homework indicates that homework does improve academic achievement.

SB: Did he say what it improves? My understanding of homework and achievement is that you will get a better course grade. Of course, you’ll get a better grade if doing homework counts for 10 or 20% of [it]. More than likely, you’ll also do better on the teacher-created tests by studying for them the night before. But that has nothing to do with actual learning. Most kids learn things for tests and then promptly forget them. That’s not real achievement. Real achievement is learning long-term life skills, the ability to be a creative thinker and work with others. Those should be the goals of education.

GreatSchools: One of your claims is that homework turns kids off learning.

SB: There are so many kids I know who don’t seem to be as intellectually curious as their parents were. My daughter went to a school at the beginning of sixth grade where, because there was a lot of homework, she never had time to read. I had her change schools. Her friends who stayed in that school are doing terribly at this point. They don’t like to read at all. They haven’t had time to develop their own interests. This is partially anecdotal, but it’s partially what educators are tearing their hair out over. Students today don’t know how to think; they don’t think outside the box.

GreatSchools: What should you do if your child has too much homework, or that it doesn’t help?

SB: My whole thing is that parents advocate for their kids. And there are different ways to advocate. If you’re going to complain, write an email but don’t send it for 24 hours. Be polite, and I always say less is more. Simply state what the problem is.

Often, teachers don’t think about homework. I had a conference with my child’s health teacher. The kids had to write a book report, and it had to be 12-point font and three pages, no more and no less. My daughter wrote her report, and it was two pages and excellent, but it wasn’t three pages, so she started to pad it. I said, “You are teaching the kids how to pad but not how to write.” [The teacher] didn’t get it.

GreatSchools: Is homework ever effective?

SB: If you are really engaged with something you’ve done at school and want to do more of it at home, that’s effective homework. If you’ve read one book by an author and you want to read four more books by another, that’s effective. To go home and answer questions about science or history, no. Are certain things necessary, maybe a little review if you’re taking a language class? You probably can do that during the school day.

Nobody is saying you should go home, sit down on your couch, and do nothing. But I feel like adults have more downtime than kids. If you go to the orthodontist, every kid is doing their homework, and adults are reading their book or magazine.

GreatSchools: Some say that the anti-homework contingent is led by middle- to upper-middle-class parents who have the luxury of saying no to homework. Whereas, low-income parents who want their children to get ahead expect them to work hard.

SB: If the schoolwork is busy work, it’s busy work whether you’re an upper-middle-class or a poor child. If in a poor school they are sending home books because [families] don’t have books in their homes, that’s great. To send home a worksheet that’s mind numbing — how does that help?

GreatSchools: But what if you want your child to go to the best college?

SB: What does that mean, the “best college?” What makes people successful is to do something they really love. It’s not a luxury; it’s a necessity. People are so worried about their kids not achieving, but if people stopped to think, they’d realize: The economy is unsettled; the job market is unsettled. I’m not sure what professions are going to be considered stable. The skills you need are to be a good problem solver, a creative thinker. Is homework teaching our kids these skills?

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9 AI hacks that Mark Zuckerberg, Sundar Pichai, Jensen Huang, and other business leaders use

  • Business leaders are using AI tools like OpenAI's ChatGPT as the sector booms. 
  • Some have tried  AI on the job , while others have played with it to write raps and translate poetry.
  • Here's how nine executives from companies like Meta, Google, and Microsoft deploy the technology.

Insider Today

Ever since OpenAI launched ChatGPT in November 2023, everyone's been talking about — and trying out — the hot new tech in their personal and professional lives.

That includes some of the world's most influential business leaders.

Many companies aside from OpenAI have released generative AI products with human-like capabilities to cash in on the hype. Users have been turning to the technology to save time and reach their goals.

Some workers have used ChatGPT to generate lesson plans , produce marketing materials, and write legal briefs. Others have turned to chatbots to help them lose weight , do homework, and plan vacations. Some even claimed they made money with AI.

And interest has also permeated the C-suite, with leaders just as keen to make the technology work for them. From translating poetry to creating rap songs, here's how executives from Meta, Google, Microsoft, and other major companies have personally used AI.

Nvidia's Jensen Huang said he uses Perplexity AI "almost every day."

quotes against homework

The CEO of the chip company that makes highly coveted GPUs to power AI models uses the AI-powered question-and-answer search engine for research, he told Wired in February this year.

In the interview, he gave an example of how Perplexity can be used to learn about recent advancements in computer-aided drug discovery.

"You want to frame the overall topic so that you could have a framework," Huang told Wired. "From that framework, you could ask more and more specific questions."

"I really love that about these large language models," he said.

The CEO said he uses OpenAI's ChatGPT as well.

AMD CEO Lisa Su said she uses Microsoft's Copilot to "summarize meetings" and "track actions."

quotes against homework

Still, Su doesn't think Microsoft's AI assistant is perfect.

"It doesn't write my emails so well," the CEO of Nvidia competitor AMD said during her SXSW keynote in March 2024. "I don't use it for that."

Microsoft has integrated Copilot into its suite of office products, including PowerPoint, Word, and Excel.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said his favorite way to use ChatGPT is to explain German philosophy and Persian poetry.

quotes against homework

Nadella said ChatGPT helps him comprehend complicated texts from philosophers like Martin Heidegger.

"I remember my father trying to read Heidegger in his forties and struggling with it, and I have attempted it a thousand times and failed," the CEO said on a June 2023 episode of Freakonomics Radio . "But I must say going and asking ChatGPT or Bing chat to summarize Heidegger is the best way to read Heidegger."

He was also impressed by the AI chatbot's ability to translate poetry. He said his favorite prompt is asking ChatGPT to translate Rumi from Urdu into English.

"The most interesting thing about it is that it captures the depth of poetry," Nadella said on the podcast. "It somehow finds, in that latent space, meaning that's beyond just the words and the translation. That I find is just phenomenal."

Venture capitalist Vinod Khosla said he used ChatGPT to write a rap for his daughter's wedding.

quotes against homework

"I wrote what I wanted to say to her as a speech, entered it into ChatGPT, said, 'Do rap lyrics for it,' it did, and then entered it into a music AI," the OpenAI investor posted on X, formerly Twitter, in October 2023.

"So I was able to blare it over the speakers, a personal rap song from me," Khosla added. "It extended my capability. It meant a lot to me."

He's the founder of Khosla Ventures, a VC investing in startups in AI, clean technology, and biomedicine, among other sectors.

CEO and cofounder of OpenAI Sam Altman said he uses his company's chatbot for translation and writing.

quotes against homework

In August 2023, Altman told Bloomberg that ChatGPT was a "life saver" for translation purposes during his world tour, where he discussed the future of AI. Over three months, he visited countries like Israel, Jordan, Qatar, the UAE, India, and South Korea.

The face behind ChatGPT said his creation helps him "write faster" and "think more."

"I see the path towards, like, this being my super assistant for all of my cognitive work," he told Bloomberg.

Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google, said he used a language model to talk to the planet Pluto with his son.

quotes against homework

In an episode of the New York Times' tech podcast " Hard Fork," Pichai said he asked LaMDA, one of the search giant's early conversational AI models, to pretend it was the planet Pluto to test its capabilities.

During one conversation, LaMDA told Pichai and his son that Pluto is "really lonely" because it's so far out in space.

"I felt sad at that point talking to it," the CEO said on the March 2023 episode of the podcast.

He also asked LaMDA what he should do for his father's 80th birthday. In response, the model suggested that he make a scrapbook.

"It's not that it's profound, but it says things and kind of sparks the imagination," he told the NYT when describing the prompt.

Google unveiled Gemini, its latest language model that could generate text and photos using prompts, in December 2023.

Billionaire investor Warren Buffett said he used ChatGPT to translate the Frank Sinatra song 'My Way' into Spanish.

quotes against homework

The chairperson of Berkshire Hathaway seemed to be satisfied with the output.

"Two seconds later, you know, it comes out" and "rhymes and does all these wonderful things," Buffett told CNBC on April 2023 regarding the song.

While the billionaire said he sees the potential for ChatGPT to save time, he was skeptical about whether it could positively impact society.

"I think this is extraordinary, but I don't know if it's beneficial," he told CNBC.

Tim Cook, CEO of Apple, said he uses ChatGPT in his personal life.

quotes against homework

Cook didn't specify how he uses the AI chatbot. He did, however, say that he sees its potential after trying it out.

"I'm excited about it," he told CNBC in a June 2023 interview. "I think there's some unique applications for it and you can bet that it's something that we're looking at closely."

Apple appears to be lagging behind some other Big Tech players on the AI front. The iPhone maker is expected to discuss its AI projects during its June developer conference.

Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg built a personal AI assistant called "Jarvis" to manage different parts of his home.

quotes against homework

Back in 2016, Jarvis controlled Zuckerberg's house's lights, appliances, temperature, music, and security systems, Zuckerberg wrote in a blog post. The CEO also said the AI assistant interacted with his phone and computer and could learn new words and concepts.

Meta rolled out Llama-2 , its large language model equivalent to OpenAI's GPT, in July 2023 to select users. Since then, the company has released AI-powered Ray-Ban Smart Glasses and AI chatbots with celebrity personas. Llama-3, its most advanced model, is still in the works.

On February 28, Axel Springer, Business Insider's parent company, joined 31 other media groups and filed a $2.3 billion suit against Google in Dutch court, alleging losses suffered due to the company's advertising practices.

quotes against homework

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  1. Jane Brody Quote: “Do your homework and keep good files. Know the

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  2. TOP 25 HOMEWORK QUOTES (of 323)

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  3. Famous Quotes Against Homework. QuotesGram

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  4. Famous Quotes Against Homework. QuotesGram

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  5. 127+ Best Homework Quotes: Exclusive Selection

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  6. 45+ Famous Homework Quotes That Will Unlock Your True Potential

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  1. CHARACTERS SPECIAL QUOTES AGAINST PARALYZE 🔥 IN DRAGON BALL LEGENDS

COMMENTS

  1. TOP 25 HOMEWORK QUOTES (of 323)

    My life is a black hole of boredom and despair." "So basically you've been doing homework." "Like I said, black hole. Kiersten White. Boredom, Black, Despair. 27 Copy quote. Do your homework, study the craft, believe in yourself, and out-work everyone. Justin Hires. Believe, Crafts, Study.

  2. Homework Quotes (49 quotes)

    Quotes tagged as "homework" Showing 1-30 of 49. "Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report written on birds that he'd had three months to write, which was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder ...

  3. Why Students Should Not Have Homework

    Examining these arguments offers important perspectives on the wider educational and developmental consequences of homework practices. 1. Elevated Stress and Health Consequences. According to Gitnux, U.S. high school students who have over 20 hours of homework per week are 27% more likely to encounter health issues.

  4. The Homework Debate: The Case Against Homework

    Gerald LeTendre, of Penn State's Education Policy Studies department points out that the shotgun approach to homework, when students all receive the same photocopied assignment which is then checked as complete rather than discussed individually with the student, is "not very effective.". He goes on to say that, "If there's no ...

  5. Homework Quotes

    There's no time left to be creative. Tom Petty. When I was growing up, my parents told me, 'Finish your dinner. People in China and India are starving.'. I tell my daughters, 'Finish your homework. People in India and China are starving for your job.'. Thomas Friedman.

  6. 446+ Homework Quotes That Speak Your Student Struggles! (Images)

    Famous Homework Quotes. "Homework is the price we pay for success. It may seem steep, but the dividends it yields are immeasurable.". - Robin Sharma. "Homework is not just an academic task; it's a character-building exercise that shapes you into a resilient and disciplined individual.". - Stephen King.

  7. 80+ Inspiring Homework Quotes To Ignite Your Motivation

    20 Funny Quotes on Homework to Brighten Your Study Session. "Homework: because 7 hours of school wasn't enough torture.". - Unknown. "Homework is a long-forgotten word in the language of fun.". - Winston Churchill. "Homework is like a race against time, where I'm the slowest runner.". - Albert Einstein. "Homework: the ...

  8. Is it time to get rid of homework? Mental health experts weigh in

    Some teachers are turning to social media to take a stand against homework.. Tiktok user @misguided.teacher says he doesn't assign it because the "whole premise of homework is flawed."

  9. Why more teachers are joining the anti-homework movement

    Tollison is part of a growing movement that believes learners can thrive academically without homework. According to Alfie Kohn, author of " The Homework Myth ," there's never a good excuse ...

  10. Homework Sayings and Homework Quotes

    Below you will find our collection of inspirational, wise, and humorous old homework quotes, homework sayings, and homework proverbs, collected over the years from a variety of sources. ... often creating a climate that forces teachers to create assignments against their better judgement. Vera Goodman. 0 ; Copy

  11. Are You Down With or Done With Homework?

    These days, nightly homework is a given in American schools, writes Kohn. "Homework isn't limited to those occasions when it seems appropriate and important. Most teachers and administrators aren't saying, 'It may be useful to do this particular project at home,'" he writes. "Rather, the point of departure seems to be, 'We've decided ahead of ...

  12. TOP 25 QUOTES BY ALFIE KOHN (of 71)

    Alfie Kohn. Strong, Educational, Desire. 106 Copy quote. If unconditional love and genuine enthusiasm are present, praise isn't necessary. If they're absent, praise won't help. Alfie Kohn. Unconditional Love, Enthusiasm, Helping. 25 Copy quote. Children, after all, are not just adults-in-the-making.

  13. 127+ Best Homework Quotes: Exclusive Selection

    Homework is a best work,but if human hate it its a worst work. — Vidhya Vijay. No kid should be getting three or four hours of homework a night. There's no breathing time, there's no family time, there are just extracurriculars and homework and then go to bed. — Ross W. Greene.

  14. The Homework Myth Quotes by Alfie Kohn

    The Homework Myth Quotes Showing 1-11 of 11. "Many mothers and father return each evening from their paid jobs only to serve as homework monitors, a position for which they never applied.". ― Alfie Kohn, The Homework Myth. tags: educational-philosophy , homework , school.

  15. Should We Get Rid of Homework?

    The authors believe this meritocratic narrative is a myth and that homework — math homework in particular — further entrenches the myth in the minds of teachers and their students.

  16. 15 Funny and Motivational Quotes about Homework

    Homework!" - no student ever. Alexa, do my homework. The teacher can always tell when you did your homework on the bus. "The most effective way to do it is to do it.". - Amelia Earhart. When in doubt, clear your desk, tie up your hair, grab a coffee, and just start. Focus on being productive instead of busy.

  17. The case against homework

    When it comes to homework wars, many parents feel like they're waging a losing battle against apathy or excuse making. But what if you happen to side with your kids about the pointlessness of their assignments? Sara Bennett, the founder of Stop Homework and coauthor of The Case Against Homework (Crown, 2006), raised hell and ultimately ...

  18. Homework Pros and Cons

    From dioramas to book reports, from algebraic word problems to research projects, whether students should be given homework, as well as the type and amount of homework, has been debated for over a century. []While we are unsure who invented homework, we do know that the word "homework" dates back to ancient Rome. Pliny the Younger asked his followers to practice their speeches at home.

  19. Famous Quotes Against Homework. QuotesGram

    Discover and share Famous Quotes Against Homework. Explore our collection of motivational and famous quotes by authors you know and love. Toggle navigation ... Homework Quotes Inspirational Famous Nursing Quotes Homework Quotes For Teens Abraham Lincoln Quotes Albert Einstein Quotes Bill Gates Quotes Bob Marley Quotes Bruce Lee Quotes Buddha ...

  20. 101 Inspirational Quotes for Homework: Embracing Challenges

    101 Inspirational Quotes for Homework. 1. "Believe in yourself, for you hold the power to make your dreams come true.". 2. "Embrace the challenges, for they are the stepping stones to greatness.". 3. "In the pursuit of knowledge, you find the strength to conquer the unknown.". 4. "The journey may be tough, but the destination is ...

  21. Against Homework Quotes, Quotations & Sayings 2024

    You could give me 43 years to do homework and I still wouldn't do it until the night before. Unknown. 139 Likes. Homework quotes. Procrastination quotes. Keeping It Real quotes. It Is What It Is quotes. The awkward moment when wikipedia has copied your homework. Unknown.

  22. The Case Against Homework Quotes by Sara Bennett

    The Case Against Homework Quotes Showing 1-1 of 1. "When I speak to teachers, it's always remarkable to me how unaware they are of the research literature—especially young teachers or student teachers.". Yet when it comes to homework, most teachers are true believers.". ― Nancy Kalish, The Case Against Homework: How Homework Is ...

  23. Best Quotes about Homework: Inspiring Words to Motivate Your Study Routine

    Quotes about homework. Homework is like a treasure hunt, the more you search, the more you learn. Homework is not a burden, but a bridge to success. Homework is the practice that perfects your skills. Homework is the fuel that ignites the fire of knowledge. Homework is the key that unlocks the door to achievement.

  24. The AI Hacks of Execs Including Meta, Google, and Microsoft's CEOs

    On February 28, Axel Springer, Business Insider's parent company, joined 31 other media groups and filed a $2.3 billion suit against Google in Dutch court, alleging losses suffered due to the ...