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Alex Green Illustration, Cheating

Why Students Cheat—and What to Do About It

A teacher seeks answers from researchers and psychologists. 

“Why did you cheat in high school?” I posed the question to a dozen former students.

“I wanted good grades and I didn’t want to work,” said Sonya, who graduates from college in June. [The students’ names in this article have been changed to protect their privacy.]

My current students were less candid than Sonya. To excuse her plagiarized Cannery Row essay, Erin, a ninth-grader with straight As, complained vaguely and unconvincingly of overwhelming stress. When he was caught copying a review of the documentary Hypernormalism , Jeremy, a senior, stood by his “hard work” and said my accusation hurt his feelings.

Cases like the much-publicized ( and enduring ) 2012 cheating scandal at high-achieving Stuyvesant High School in New York City confirm that academic dishonesty is rampant and touches even the most prestigious of schools. The data confirms this as well. A 2012 Josephson Institute’s Center for Youth Ethics report revealed that more than half of high school students admitted to cheating on a test, while 74 percent reported copying their friends’ homework. And a survey of 70,000 high school students across the United States between 2002 and 2015 found that 58 percent had plagiarized papers, while 95 percent admitted to cheating in some capacity.

So why do students cheat—and how do we stop them?

According to researchers and psychologists, the real reasons vary just as much as my students’ explanations. But educators can still learn to identify motivations for student cheating and think critically about solutions to keep even the most audacious cheaters in their classrooms from doing it again.

Rationalizing It


First, know that students realize cheating is wrong—they simply see themselves as moral in spite of it.

“They cheat just enough to maintain a self-concept as honest people. They make their behavior an exception to a general rule,” said Dr. David Rettinger , professor at the University of Mary Washington and executive director of the Center for Honor, Leadership, and Service, a campus organization dedicated to integrity.

According to Rettinger and other researchers, students who cheat can still see themselves as principled people by rationalizing cheating for reasons they see as legitimate.

Some do it when they don’t see the value of work they’re assigned, such as drill-and-kill homework assignments, or when they perceive an overemphasis on teaching content linked to high-stakes tests.

“There was no critical thinking, and teachers seemed pressured to squish it into their curriculum,” said Javier, a former student and recent liberal arts college graduate. “They questioned you on material that was never covered in class, and if you failed the test, it was progressively harder to pass the next time around.”

But students also rationalize cheating on assignments they see as having value.

High-achieving students who feel pressured to attain perfection (and Ivy League acceptances) may turn to cheating as a way to find an edge on the competition or to keep a single bad test score from sabotaging months of hard work. At Stuyvesant, for example, students and teachers identified the cutthroat environment as a factor in the rampant dishonesty that plagued the school.

And research has found that students who receive praise for being smart—as opposed to praise for effort and progress—are more inclined to exaggerate their performance and to cheat on assignments , likely because they are carrying the burden of lofty expectations.

A Developmental Stage

When it comes to risk management, adolescent students are bullish. Research has found that teenagers are biologically predisposed to be more tolerant of unknown outcomes and less bothered by stated risks than their older peers.

“In high school, they’re risk takers developmentally, and can’t see the consequences of immediate actions,” Rettinger says. “Even delayed consequences are remote to them.”

While cheating may not be a thrill ride, students already inclined to rebel against curfews and dabble in illicit substances have a certain comfort level with being reckless. They’re willing to gamble when they think they can keep up the ruse—and more inclined to believe they can get away with it.

Cheating also appears to be almost contagious among young people—and may even serve as a kind of social adhesive, at least in environments where it is widely accepted.  A study of military academy students from 1959 to 2002 revealed that students in communities where cheating is tolerated easily cave in to peer pressure, finding it harder not to cheat out of fear of losing social status if they don’t.

Michael, a former student, explained that while he didn’t need to help classmates cheat, he felt “unable to say no.” Once he started, he couldn’t stop.

A student cheats using answers on his hand.

Technology Facilitates and Normalizes It

With smartphones and Alexa at their fingertips, today’s students have easy access to quick answers and content they can reproduce for exams and papers.  Studies show that technology has made cheating in school easier, more convenient, and harder to catch than ever before.

To Liz Ruff, an English teacher at Garfield High School in Los Angeles, students’ use of social media can erode their understanding of authenticity and intellectual property. Because students are used to reposting images, repurposing memes, and watching parody videos, they “see ownership as nebulous,” she said.

As a result, while they may want to avoid penalties for plagiarism, they may not see it as wrong or even know that they’re doing it.

This confirms what Donald McCabe, a Rutgers University Business School professor,  reported in his 2012 book ; he found that more than 60 percent of surveyed students who had cheated considered digital plagiarism to be “trivial”—effectively, students believed it was not actually cheating at all.

Strategies for Reducing Cheating

Even moral students need help acting morally, said  Dr. Jason M. Stephens , who researches academic motivation and moral development in adolescents at the University of Auckland’s School of Learning, Development, and Professional Practice. According to Stephens, teachers are uniquely positioned to infuse students with a sense of responsibility and help them overcome the rationalizations that enable them to think cheating is OK.

1. Turn down the pressure cooker. Students are less likely to cheat on work in which they feel invested. A multiple-choice assessment tempts would-be cheaters, while a unique, multiphase writing project measuring competencies can make cheating much harder and less enticing. Repetitive homework assignments are also a culprit, according to research , so teachers should look at creating take-home assignments that encourage students to think critically and expand on class discussions. Teachers could also give students one free pass on a homework assignment each quarter, for example, or let them drop their lowest score on an assignment.

2. Be thoughtful about your language.   Research indicates that using the language of fixed mindsets , like praising children for being smart as opposed to praising them for effort and progress , is both demotivating and increases cheating. When delivering feedback, researchers suggest using phrases focused on effort like, “You made really great progress on this paper” or “This is excellent work, but there are still a few areas where you can grow.”

3. Create student honor councils. Give students the opportunity to enforce honor codes or write their own classroom/school bylaws through honor councils so they can develop a full understanding of how cheating affects themselves and others. At Fredericksburg Academy, high school students elect two Honor Council members per grade. These students teach the Honor Code to fifth graders, who, in turn, explain it to younger elementary school students to help establish a student-driven culture of integrity. Students also write a pledge of authenticity on every assignment. And if there is an honor code transgression, the council gathers to discuss possible consequences. 

4. Use metacognition. Research shows that metacognition, a process sometimes described as “ thinking about thinking ,” can help students process their motivations, goals, and actions. With my ninth graders, I use a centuries-old resource to discuss moral quandaries: the play Macbeth . Before they meet the infamous Thane of Glamis, they role-play as medical school applicants, soccer players, and politicians, deciding if they’d cheat, injure, or lie to achieve goals. I push students to consider the steps they take to get the outcomes they desire. Why do we tend to act in the ways we do? What will we do to get what we want? And how will doing those things change who we are? Every tragedy is about us, I say, not just, as in Macbeth’s case, about a man who succumbs to “vaulting ambition.”

5. Bring honesty right into the curriculum. Teachers can weave a discussion of ethical behavior into curriculum. Ruff and many other teachers have been inspired to teach media literacy to help students understand digital plagiarism and navigate the widespread availability of secondary sources online, using guidance from organizations like Common Sense Media .

There are complicated psychological dynamics at play when students cheat, according to experts and researchers. While enforcing rules and consequences is important, knowing what’s really motivating students to cheat can help you foster integrity in the classroom instead of just penalizing the cheating.

APS

  • Teaching Tips

Cheating: Preventing and Dealing with Academic Dishonesty

Someday it will happen to you. A student will turn in such an excellent, well-written paper that you seriously doubt its authenticity. Or, during a test, you will look up and find a student copying from another student. The sinking feeling that immediately weighs in on you could be overwhelming as you realize you must decide how to deal with a suspected or actual case of cheating.

If it hasn’t happened to you yet, either you are new at the game, you have your head in the sand, or you have been incredibly lucky. Or, perhaps you have created a situation in which cheating is unlikely. Studies show that about 40 percent of students cheat in a given term.

An Ounce of Prevention

Communicate Policies on Cheating

My institution requests all instructors to state their policy on cheating in the syllabus. Believe it or not, students have argued that they should not be punished for cheating because they were never told they couldn’t do it. State clearly when students may cooperate and when they must work independently. Students who have been encouraged to use programmable calculators in math courses may naturally expect that they can use them in your class. (Many calculators permit considerable amounts of text to be stored in their memories. Either design the test so that calculators are not necessary, or insist that they push the erase button to delete text memory.)

Relate With Your Students: Avoid Adversarial Relationships

Students may cheat because they feel alienated from the system. Let your students know that you respect them and expect the best from them. I believe students are less likely to cheat if they feel they know and like the instructor. Learning and using students’ names in class may have a beneficial side effect of reducing cheating.

Teach Students What Plagiarism Is So They Can Avoid Doing It

The nature of cheating depends on the assignment. Written assignments run the risk of plagiarism. Some instructors may be surprised to learn that students sometimes plagiarize unintentionally because they do not know enough about what constitutes scholarship. Before giving written assignments, it is a good idea to discuss how to credit other people’s work. Some departments promulgate written guidelines on plagiarism.

We will discuss later what to do when you suspect cheating. But one technique that is particularly suited to written assignments is to ask a student whom you suspect of plagiarism to explain something in the paper in other words. More sophisticated techniques include blanking out key words and asking the student to fill in the spaces.

Structure Writing Assignments So Students Cannot Use Others’ Work

Having informed students what plagiarism is, you should structure the timing of the assignment in such a way that plagiarism becomes less likely. Several weeks before the final paper is due ask the students for a statement of their topic. Next ask for a preliminary list of references that they intend to consult. Then have them turn in a tentative outline. Any changes you may suggest at these stages will make it more difficult for them to turn in a paper previously prepared by someone else. The only clear case of plagiarism I have experienced occurred with a student who had missed several weeks of class and skipped these stages. Your guidelines should suggest that they keep all drafts of their work, notes, printouts of computer searches, etc. They should photocopy the first page of every article or book cited in their reference list. This way they can’t cite papers they haven’t at least laid eyes on. Some faculty also inform students that they keep a record of all papers written, or the papers themselves, for the preceding five years.

Take Control of the Test Situation

Arrange the classroom situation to suit the nature of the test. You may want students to sit in every other seat, take assigned seats to break up groups of would-be cheaters, or leave the front row open for latecomers, etc. Some instructors number all tests and have students leave completed tests face down on the desk. Then they may be picked up in order, and papers of suspected cheaters can be compared for similarities. (Be aware that papers can be similar if students study together. But hearing boards that review suspected cases of cheating can be skeptical of purely statistical evidence.)

I require students to reverse baseball caps because the bill makes it harder for you to monitor their gaze. (I do not ask for their removal: A student may be taking chemotherapy, or just having a bad hair day.)

You should resist their complaints to the contrary and efforts to put you on the defensive. You do not need to explain why they should follow your instructions. You may instruct a student who is behaving suspiciously to sit elsewhere without making an accusation or justifying yourself.

Opinions vary on how faculty members should dress. But) make a point to dress in a businesslike manner on test day because I believe it is important to convey to students that they should take the situation seriously and the professor’s appearance can make the point without making them uncomfortable.

How you manage the testing situation depends on factors such as the type of test, class size and whether you reuse the same test for different classes or across semesters. Because I seldom reuse tests, for example, I generally do not need to count the booklets as) pass them out, nor do I need to recover them. But once a student has left the room, I do not permit that student to reenter. In large classes, I use alternate forms of the exam (e.g., same items appear in three different orders) so that a student looking at a classmate’s answer sheet is not helped by doing so. Simply changing the order of pages is not nearly as effective as scrambling items within pages.

If your class is large enough that you don’t know all students, require them to show picture ID and sign their test (as well as print their name on the test). Be sure to have additional proctors in large classes. I try to have help in classes larger than 75, about one for every additional 100 students.

Be Prepared

After teaching for 30 years I thought) knew all the tricks students used. Then one term I was confronted by two new ones. So I sat down and compiled a list of over 40 different ways to cheat, and about the same number of ways to prevent cheating. I am sure there are more. My point is that we need to keep a very large number of variables and contingencies in mind on test day.

For example, what would you do if you entered your classroom and saw “Professor X’s test has been canceled” written on the blackboard and many of the students had left? Suppose the fire alarm goes off in the middle of the test. Suppose students go to leave the test and find the doors locked by computer. Then, when you use the emergency phone to call campus security you are advised that the only way to unlock them is to pull the fire alarm. Imagine running out of test booklets because the secretary miscounted. All of these have happened in my experience.

During the test, the student can cheat in two basic ways: refer to contraband materials or get help from another person. I have already mentioned the use of programmable calculators. Students occasionally wear earphone tape recorders to tests. I require them to give me the cassette. Less technologically sophisticated but effective is hiding written material under clothing, which is awkward to prove for obvious reasons.

A student receiving help from neighbors is probably harder to detect. Folklore tells of the “power wedge,” whereby a group of students arranges itself in the pattern of geese in flight with the one who knows the material in the lead position. Signaling methods can be ingenious; the “M&M” method indicates the correct alternative by the color of the candy. A simpler method is to point to the question with the pencil as if studying it and touching left ear for “a,” knee for “b,” etc. Be on the lookout for students who appear to be doing an impression of a third base coach.

One of the most clever methods includes a student bringing a friend who is not in the course to sit next to him or her. The friend takes an exam and works on it as if a registered student. The actual student copies the answers from the ringer. When they are done, the ringer can either walk away and leave the test at the seat or turn it in with a fake name. Alternatively, the ringer can walk out with the test, which could also wind up in a fraternity file.

When a Student Cheats

Know and Follow Your Institution’s Procedures

My institution has a written set of guidelines on dealing with cheating. Be familiar with your institution’s policies and know what steps are available to you before an incident arises. Have the student(s) read the guidelines so they become familiar with the alternatives and processes set forth.

Settling Matters Informally

Generally, you should first try to settle the matter informally. But you and the student need to know how to proceed if the student denies the charge, or refuses to accept your proposed penalty. If you are lucky enough to settle the matter informally, be sure to get the student to sign a statement admitting the offense and accepting the penalty. You should file this statement for possible future use and send a copy to the department chair or the dean. This student may be a repeat offender requiring more serious action.

Settling Matters Formally

Some cheating incidents will require resolution through formal institutional processes. Be aware of deadlines and what information must be submitted. Write memos to your file on incidents of cheating that you witness. Write down details of the case such as who sat next to the student. Have TAs or proctors write statements on what they witnessed. Get signed statements from all parties, including the student, if he or she confesses. In brief, keep a paper trail.

The Legal System and Cheating

We live in a litigious society and many situations that were once dealt with informally now wind up in court. The best way to avoid lawsuit is to know and abide by your institution’s policies and procedures. Many faculty look the other way when they see cheating because they believe that it is necessary to have evidence that would stand up in a court of law, or they believe the procedures are too bureaucratic and they do not want to deal with them.

Courts will generally not get involved in a case if the student has been accorded due process, which is a less stringent criterion that having to follow legal rules of evidence and procedure. Due process has been accorded when the student has had an adequate opportunity to be heard, established institutional rules and procedures have been followed, the student has been assumed innocent until proven guilty, and the burden of proof has been placed on the institution.

Keep a Sense of Humor

Finally, do not take yourself too seriously. One instructor was trying to get the last stragglers to turn in their final exams. He announced that he would not accept any more papers after a certain time. Still, one student kept on working. When she ignored his final ultimatum, he refused to accept her paper. She walked up to the desk, looked him in the eye, and said, “Do you know who I am?” Thinking that she might be the daughter of a trustee, he warily said, “No.” Whereupon, she slipped her paper into the middle of the pile, squared it up, and strolled out. Sometimes there is nothing we can do.

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About the Author

Donald McBurney received his PhD from Brown University in 1964 and has proctored exams and read term papers for more than 30 years, first at the University of Tennessee, and now at the University of Pittsburgh where he is professor of Psychology. He works in sensory processes and perception, specializing in psychophysical work on taste and smell. He is the author or coauthor of three textbooks, Introduction to Sensation/Perception (2nd ed.), Prentice-Hall, 1984; Research Methods (3rd ed.), Brooks/Cole, 1994, and How to Think Like a Psychologist, Prentice-Hall (forthcoming).

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Common Reasons Students Cheat

Students working in a lab wearing scrubs and gloves.

Poor Time Management

The most common reason students cite for committing academic dishonesty is that they ran out of time. The good news is that this is almost always avoidable. Good time management skills are a must for success in college (as well as in life). Visit the Undergraduate Academic Advisement website  for tips on how to manage your time in college.

Stress/Overload

Another common reason students engage in dishonest behavior has to do with overload: too many homework assignments, work issues, relationship problems, COVID-19. Before you resort to behaving in an academically dishonest way, we encourage you to reach out to your professor, your TA, your academic advisor or even  UB’s counseling services .

Wanting to Help Friends

While this sounds like a good reason to do something, it in no way helps a person to be assisted in academic dishonesty. Your friends are responsible for learning what is expected of them and providing evidence of that learning to their instructor. Your unauthorized assistance falls under the “ aiding in academic dishonesty ” violation and makes both you and your friend guilty.

Fear of Failure

Students report that they resort to academic dishonesty when they feel that they won’t be able to successfully perform the task (e.g., write the computer code, compose the paper, do well on the test). Fear of failure prompts students to get unauthorized help, but the repercussions of cheating far outweigh the repercussions of failing. First, when you are caught cheating, you may fail anyway. Second, you tarnish your reputation as a trustworthy student. And third, you are establishing habits that will hurt you in the long run. When your employer or graduate program expects you to have certain knowledge based on your coursework and you don’t have that knowledge, you diminish the value of a UB education for you and your fellow alumni.

"Everyone Does it" Phenomenon

Sometimes it can feel like everyone around us is dishonest or taking shortcuts. We hear about integrity scandals on the news and in our social media feeds. Plus, sometimes we witness students cheating and seeming to get away with it. This feeling that “everyone does it” is often reported by students as a reason that they decided to be academically dishonest. The important thing to remember is that you have one reputation and you need to protect it. Once identified as someone who lacks integrity, you are no longer given the benefit of the doubt in any situation. Additionally, research shows that once you cheat, it’s easier to do it the next time and the next, paving the path for you to become genuinely dishonest in your academic pursuits.

Temptation Due to Unmonitored Environments or Weak Assignment Design

When students take assessments without anyone monitoring them, they may be tempted to access unauthorized resources because they feel like no one will know. Especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, students have been tempted to peek at online answer sites, Google a test question, or even converse with friends during a test. Because our environments may have changed does not mean that our expectations have. If you wouldn’t cheat in a classroom, don’t be tempted to cheat at home. Your personal integrity is also at stake.

Different Understanding of Academic Integrity Policies

Standards and norms for academically acceptable behavior can vary. No matter where you’re from, whether the West Coast or the far East, the standards for academic integrity at UB must be followed to further the goals of a premier research institution. Become familiar with our policies that govern academically honest behavior.

05 Resources

Research into cheating at the college and university began in 1990 by Dr. Donald McCabe, one of the founders of ICAI. This research continues today, spearheaded by ICAI and its members.

McCabe’s original research and subsequent follow-up studies show that more than 60 percent of university students freely admit to cheating in some form.

In March 2020, ICAI researchers tested an updated version of the McCabe survey with 840 students across multiple college campuses. This work showed the following rates of key cheating behaviors:

  • Cheated in any way on an exam

facts and stats 1

  • Getting someone else to do your academic work (e.g. essay, exam, assignment) and submitting it as your own.

facts and stats 2

  • Using unauthorized electronic resources (e.g. articles, Wikipedia, YouTube) for a paper, project, homework or other assignments.

facts and stats 3

  • Working together on an assignment with other students when the instructor asked for individual work.

facts and stats 4

  • Paraphrasing or copying a few sentences or more from any source without citing it in a paper or assignment you submitted.

facts and stats 5

*This includes data from 5 institutions including a private university, two large public universities, a small public university, and a small private liberal arts college

Rettinger, et al. (2020) in prep

Cheating in High School

McCabe also conducted surveys of over 70,000 high school students at over 24 high schools in the United States. This work demonstrated that 64 percent of students admitted to cheating on a test, 58 percent admitted to plagiarism and 95 percent said they participated in some form of cheating, whether it was on a test, plagiarism or copying homework.

64

More about Don McCabe’s surveys and statistics, including sources for these statistics, is available in his excellent book Cheating in College .

Why Do Students Cheat?

  • Posted July 19, 2016
  • By Zachary Goldman

Talk Back

In March, Usable Knowledge published an article on ethical collaboration , which explored researchers’ ideas about how to develop classrooms and schools where collaboration is nurtured but cheating is avoided. The piece offers several explanations for why students cheat and provides powerful ideas about how to create ethical communities. The article left me wondering how students themselves might respond to these ideas, and whether their experiences with cheating reflected the researchers’ understanding. In other words, how are young people “reading the world,” to quote Paulo Freire , when it comes to questions of cheating, and what might we learn from their perspectives?

I worked with Gretchen Brion-Meisels to investigate these questions by talking to two classrooms of students from Massachusetts and Texas about their experiences with cheating. We asked these youth informants to connect their own insights and ideas about cheating with the ideas described in " Ethical Collaboration ." They wrote from a range of perspectives, grappling with what constitutes cheating, why people cheat, how people cheat, and when cheating might be ethically acceptable. In doing so, they provide us with additional insights into why students cheat and how schools might better foster ethical collaboration.

Why Students Cheat

Students critiqued both the individual decision-making of peers and the school-based structures that encourage cheating. For example, Julio (Massachusetts) wrote, “Teachers care about cheating because its not fair [that] students get good grades [but] didn't follow the teacher's rules.” His perspective represents one set of ideas that we heard, which suggests that cheating is an unethical decision caused by personal misjudgment. Umna (Massachusetts) echoed this idea, noting that “cheating is … not using the evidence in your head and only using the evidence that’s from someone else’s head.”

Other students focused on external factors that might make their peers feel pressured to cheat. For example, Michima (Massachusetts) wrote, “Peer pressure makes students cheat. Sometimes they have a reason to cheat like feeling [like] they need to be the smartest kid in class.” Kayla (Massachusetts) agreed, noting, “Some people cheat because they want to seem cooler than their friends or try to impress their friends. Students cheat because they think if they cheat all the time they’re going to get smarter.” In addition to pressure from peers, students spoke about pressure from adults, pressure related to standardized testing, and the demands of competing responsibilities.

When Cheating is Acceptable

Students noted a few types of extenuating circumstances, including high stakes moments. For example, Alejandra (Texas) wrote, “The times I had cheated [were] when I was failing a class, and if I failed the final I would repeat the class. And I hated that class and I didn’t want to retake it again.” Here, she identifies allegiance to a parallel ethical value: Graduating from high school. In this case, while cheating might be wrong, it is an acceptable means to a higher-level goal.

Encouraging an Ethical School Community

Several of the older students with whom we spoke were able to offer us ideas about how schools might create more ethical communities. Sam (Texas) wrote, “A school where cheating isn't necessary would be centered around individualization and learning. Students would learn information and be tested on the information. From there the teachers would assess students' progress with this information, new material would be created to help individual students with what they don't understand. This way of teaching wouldn't be based on time crunching every lesson, but more about helping a student understand a concept.”

Sam provides a vision for the type of school climate in which collaboration, not cheating, would be most encouraged. Kaith (Texas), added to this vision, writing, “In my own opinion students wouldn’t find the need to cheat if they knew that they had the right undivided attention towards them from their teachers and actually showed them that they care about their learning. So a school where cheating wasn’t necessary would be amazing for both teachers and students because teachers would be actually getting new things into our brains and us as students would be not only attentive of our teachers but also in fact learning.”

Both of these visions echo a big idea from “ Ethical Collaboration ”: The importance of reducing the pressure to achieve. Across students’ comments, we heard about how self-imposed pressure, peer pressure, and pressure from adults can encourage cheating.

Where Student Opinions Diverge from Research

The ways in which students spoke about support differed from the descriptions in “ Ethical Collaboration .” The researchers explain that, to reduce cheating, students need “vertical support,” or standards, guidelines, and models of ethical behavior. This implies that students need support understanding what is ethical. However, our youth informants describe a type of vertical support that centers on listening and responding to students’ needs. They want teachers to enable ethical behavior through holistic support of individual learning styles and goals. Similarly, researchers describe “horizontal support” as creating “a school environment where students know, and can persuade their peers, that no one benefits from cheating,” again implying that students need help understanding the ethics of cheating. Our youth informants led us to believe instead that the type of horizontal support needed may be one where collective success is seen as more important than individual competition.

Why Youth Voices Matter, and How to Help Them Be Heard

Our purpose in reaching out to youth respondents was to better understand whether the research perspectives on cheating offered in “ Ethical Collaboration ” mirrored the lived experiences of young people. This blog post is only a small step in that direction; young peoples’ perspectives vary widely across geographic, demographic, developmental, and contextual dimensions, and we do not mean to imply that these youth informants speak for all youth. However, our brief conversations suggest that asking youth about their lived experiences can benefit the way that educators understand school structures.

Too often, though, students are cut out of conversations about school policies and culture. They rarely even have access to information on current educational research, partially because they are not the intended audience of such work. To expand opportunities for student voice, we need to create spaces — either online or in schools — where students can research a current topic that interests them. Then they can collect information, craft arguments they want to make, and deliver their messages. Educators can create the spaces for this youth-driven work in schools, communities, and even policy settings — helping to support young people as both knowledge creators and knowledge consumers. 

Additional Resources

  • Read “ Student Voice in Educational Research and Reform ” [PDF] by Alison Cook-Sather.
  • Read “ The Significance of Students ” [PDF] by Dana L. Mitra.
  • Read “ Beyond School Spirit ” by Emily J. Ozer and Dana Wright.

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Academic Dishonesty: 5 Methods of Identifying Cheating and Plagiarism

students cheat on assignments and exams

One aspect of teaching that can make an instructor feel pessimistic and disheartening is when a student attempts to gain an unfair advantage.  Most of the time, this is labeled simply as cheating , defined as intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials on any academic exercise , or plagiarism , the appropriation or use of another person's ideas, results, or words without giving appropriate credit , but we see instances of fabrication and other acts of dishonesty.  What can you do to combat acts of academic dishonesty?  This article is meant to help faculty members at any level, even teaching assistants, identify possible occurrences of academic dishonesty.

Know Your School’s Policies & Be Transparent with Your Students

When you become a faculty member at a new institution, take a more extensive teaching role at your current institution, or even a long-time teacher implementing new curriculum changes, you must identify and know the school’s policy and rules regarding academic honesty and creating a fair classroom environment.  Each faculty member may enforce the rules differently, but it’s critical that the students know your classroom rules and expectations upfront. A few key items to consider:

  • Do you want them to work with other students on their homework?
  • What rules and procedures do you have for assignments, reports, and exams?
  • Put this information in your syllabus and discuss this with them on Day 1 of your course with transparency. 

If one of your students performs an act of academic dishonesty in your course, this will allow you to enforce the sanctions professionally.  If you don’t know where to find this information, ask your faculty mentor or your university’s appropriate administrative office.  These offices are usually the academic honor office, the department or college office, or the Dean of Faculties office, depending on the institution.

2. Watch for the Methods Students Use to Cheat and Plagiarize

The reasons why students cheat have not changed, but how students cheat has changed dramatically.  Typically, there is an assumption that most cheaters are bad or failing students, but students cheat for a multitude of reasons: poor time management skills, a tough class schedule, stress, and anxiety, or poor communication of the rules by their faculty members.  The use of social media and other electronic resources has changed academia over the last 20 years. A few examples of some cheating methods to watch out for include:

  • Social Media Communication: Students discuss test questions and individual assignments via social media and other chat apps to give their friends and colleagues academic advantages. 
  • Smartphones: Many students take pictures of their answers with their smartphones and send them to others using text messages.
  • Smartwatches: Recently, smartwatches have become more prevalent and allow communication and internet browsing without the use of a cell phone.  They allow students to access study files and answers that were not authorized by the faculty member. 
  • Groups that Share Tests: Many student organizations have tests and assignments from previous semesters that allow students to look up questions from a faculty member or specific class. 
  • Unauthorized Help: Tutoring services will discuss how to “beat a test” or “write the perfect paper” by giving students unauthorized aid. This can also include groups or individuals who may offer to write a paper or take a test for a fee on behalf of the student.

Being smart as a faculty member is knowing that these outside resources are available and to identify when they are being used improperly.

3. Be Proactive, Not Just Reactive

For some instances of academic dishonesty, the origin of the problem comes back to the faculty member not taking a proactive role in combating the acts.

  • Full Established Boundaries: The first place for immediate improvement is the discussion of unacceptable acts on the first day of class and syllabus.  Many faculty members will only include the minimum required statement in their syllabus.  This does not properly set student academic honesty boundaries.  Establishing such boundaries might be informing students of the use of plagiarism detection software, describing acceptable behavior and communication about assignments on social media, or acceptable help on homework, essays, and reports.
  • Variety in Assessment: Another place where faculty can improve is writing different assignments or multiple forms for exams.  Changing up how you ask questions, what essay question prompts you to use, and creating different forms for exams can be time-consuming. However, this effort will reward students with a fair and objective assessment.  If you are concerned with academic dishonesty in your course, putting in some work early will benefit your course in the long run.

4. Grade Assignments, Reports, and Essays Attentively

Most of the time, trust your own feelings when looking for possible occurrences of academic dishonesty.  When grading assignments, if the work seems more advanced than the student’s level or that they do not seem to follow the question prompt, this can be a strong indication of plagiarism. A few ways to validate these concerns and provide either “proof” or deterrents of this behavior include:

  • Show Your Work: Require multiple drafts of a paper and give feedback regarding citation standards throughout the writing process. 
  • Side-by-Side Grading: If you have research papers or lab reports in which students worked with a partner or in a group, grade the assignments side-by-side.  While the data or general content may be the same, direct copying will be more apparent. 
  • Online Plagiarism Checkers: Technology has been developed to help identify plagiarism.  Websites such as Turnitin.com , Unicheck , PlagarismSearch , and others have students upload their essays/reports then compare all submissions to other online resources and papers turned in for other courses or at other institutions.  Many schools have licenses for this technology and you should utilize it on any type of critical thinking or writing assignment.

5. Manage Exam Administration and Proctoring

Most attention is focused on deterring cheating is during exams.  A few methods that can specifically help discourage academic dishonesty during these high-stake assessments include:

Assigned Seats: A good first step is to assign seats for each exam. While this might be challenging for a large lecture hall, it minimizes the chance of friends and study partners sitting next to each other; thereby limiting the student interaction.  It also allows faculty or proctors to know who is present to take the exam.

  • Variety & Alterations by Section: As mentioned before, having multiple forms of an exam can be a great preventive for cheating.  Having different exam forms with the same questions mixed in a different order, or similar questions about the same are all small, minor changes that can promote an honest testing environment.

One topic of test administration that does not get enough attention is proctoring.  In a small classroom, there may be only one adult in a 20-40 student class.  For larger lectures containing 200-400 students, teaching assistants help faculty make sure students are taking their exams honestly.  How can proctors create an honest environment? 

  • They must proctor actively:  Many proctors distribute exams and then ignore the students to grade other assignments, work on their computers, look at their cell phone or possibly leave the room.  After you pass out the exams, you should walk around, checking for anything suspicious, and watching for students looking at other exams.  If you spot any of these behaviors, make an immediate change. 
  • Reminders About the Rules: Announcements about looking at their own paper can only help so much, so moving students to correct behavior might be necessary.  Having another set of eyes and having another presence in the room, even for a brief time, can correct behavior. 
  • Instructor Collaboration: Faculty members that do have test proctors should meet with them before the exam, explain to them the correct protocols, and describe past experiences or issues that occur during exams.  This five-minute discussion will help a test proctor during a situation they have never faced and keep them actively involved during the exam session.

While cheating and plagiarism can cause many faculty members to become frustrated, being able to give your students a fair testing environments and objective assignment is the goal of all successful educators. 

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students cheat on assignments and exams

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students cheat on assignments and exams

We have been hearing stories about academic cheating: from students caught cheating on homework assignments as well as college entrance exams to teachers being caught in cheating scandals, such as the ones in Atlanta , Georgia, and Columbus , Ohio.

Today, between 75% and 98% of college students surveyed each year report having cheated in high school. So, if cheating is happening at that large a scale, is it just inevitable? And can we even blame our students?

In order to figure out how to answer these questions, it’s important to consider why students cheat in the first place. Although the obvious reason seems to be the desire of students to get ahead (eg, to get a good grade, or to avoid a punishment), the real reason is actually a bit more complicated.

Academic goals matter

When students do their schoolwork (which includes everything from daily homework assignments to major examinations), they usually have certain goals in mind. These goals vary from one academic task to another.

In other words, if you were to ask a student, “What is your goal in taking next week’s chemistry test?”, the student should be able to tell you what she wants to get out of the experience.

My colleagues and I have been studying the psychology behind academic cheating for the past two decades, and we have found that students’ goals in their academic tasks are related in very predictable ways to their likelihood of cheating. Research also indicates that teachers and parents can influence those goals, and thus potentially deter cheating.

If the sole reason for engaging in an academic task is to get a good grade, then it’s probably easy for a student to justify the act of cheating.

As my colleagues and I found , some students might have short-term reasons. For instance, for some students, it might be as simple a motivation as the desire to go to a friend’s party on Saturday night. If they think that their parents will not let them go if they fail the test, they might take the easier option to cheat, to be able to go to the party.

For some others, it might be a longer-term reason: They might want a good salary and other luxuries in their adult life and believe that the only path to those things would be a good college. And they might be willing to cheat on their tests to be able to get ahead in their future.

Students have different goals

Whereas these reasons may seem selfish and shortsighted to some adults, to many adolescents, who are still unable to consider the consequences of their actions, these goals may seem perfectly reasonable.

We refer to these goals as “extrinsic” goals. Research indicates that students who experience classrooms in which extrinsic goals are common are more likely to cheat.

Clearly, not all students have these goals. Some students are motivated by their desire to learn.

students cheat on assignments and exams

So, for some students, the goal might be to truly understand and master the material that is being studied. In other words, whereas some students might have a goal of getting a good grade on a chemistry test in order to get something (eg, to go to a party), others might have the goal of truly learning chemistry: “I want to understand chemistry because I want to develop drugs to help fight cancer; I know that understanding chemistry is essential for me to be successful in this career.”

We refer to these goals as “mastery” goals. Research indicates that students who experience classrooms in which mastery goals are valued and encouraged are less likely to cheat .

If one thinks about this, it starts to make sense. When students are learning in classrooms where the teacher truly values mastery of the academic content (as opposed to getting a good grade on an assessment), then “cheating” really doesn’t offer any benefits to the students.

Teachers can help

The ways in which assessments of student learning are administered are particularly relevant in discussions of academic cheating. If results of assessments ultimately come down to a grade on a test or an assignment (eg, an “A” or an “F”), then students often will come to value the grade more than what they are actually learning.

However, if, in contrast, the assessment truly focuses on a demonstration of mastery of content, then students will focus on mastering that content and not just on getting an “A.”

When students have to demonstrate mastery of material, cheating doesn’t serve much of a purpose – if you truly have to show the teacher that you understand and can apply the information that you learned, then cheating won’t buy you any shortcuts.

Fortunately, there are strategies that educators can use to facilitate students’ adoption of mastery goals instead of extrinsic goals.

Here are a few suggestions, based on our research :

Make sure that assignments and exams require students to demonstrate mastery of content, as opposed to just requiring the regurgitation of memorized facts.

When students do not demonstrate mastery on an assignment or a test, allow them to redo the assignment. Educators sometimes don’t think that this recommendation is fair – after all, if one student gets all of the answers right the first time, why should someone else get a second chance? But, if the goal is really to learn or “master” the content, then does it really matter if the student gets a second chance?

Avoid high-stakes, one-time assessments.

Always provide students’ grades privately – don’t share results publicly or display distributions of scores; students often will cheat in order to avoid looking “dumb.”

Ultimately, some students will inevitably cheat. But, by considering why students are doing various academic tasks in the first place and helping them set their “mastery” goals, educators can make a significant dent in the epidemic of academic cheating.

  • Adolescents
  • high stakes testing
  • Atlanta Cheating scandal
  • Academic cheating
  • Intrinsic goals
  • Student learning
  • Good grades
  • Learning motivation

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How and Why Do College Students Cheat on Assignments?

Writing-Help has conducted new research, surveying 800 students from U.S. universities to find out how and why college student cheat on assignments.

86% of surveyed students admit they cheat in college in one way or another. Among them, 76% just copied others’ works from online resources, thus infringing copyright. When we asked about the plagiarism issues, students confessed to trying to paraphrase or synonymize those works.

Others appeared to be more concerned about getting plagiarism-free assignments: 53% said they asked AI text generators to craft essays for them; 48% replied they better trust their works to custom writing services because it’s a human writer crafting papers from scratch there, and the originality won’t suffer.

students cheat on assignments and exams

Why do Students Use Custom Writing Services?

The #1 reason for using writing services is the pressure to succeed (87%). High expectations from teachers, parents, and the public in general, based on the stereotype that one should perform well in school and college to land a good job and succeed in life, lead to students’ stress and anxiety. Afraid to fail the expectations, students seek assistance to manage their academic results. Another motivation is panic: 63% feel their knowledge isn’t enough to write an A-worthy essay, addressing online services for help. (Impostor syndrome and fear of failure are also here.)

The extensive group of motivations behind cheating on written assignments relates to time management: 68% of students lack this skill and can’t organize their schedule to complete tasks on the due date. For 85%, things are more complicated: Struggling with academic overload, they can’t physically meet all the strict deadlines and decide to delegate some written tasks to related services.

An expectedly high percentage of respondents (71%) call laziness the motivation for ordering papers from writing services. For 54%, cheating is OK or even necessary to stay competitive: Seeing their peers doing that, not getting caught, and achieving high results while spending less effort, honest students lose motivation and decide to follow the lead of those classmates.

For 33%, the lack of interest in a subject is enough to ask someone else to complete this subject’s related tasks for them. More practical and career-focused, modern students don’t see any reason to spend effort on anything they consider irrelevant or invaluable for their future life.

students cheat on assignments and exams

How Often do Students Use Essay Writing Services?

Given the primary motivations behind using essay writing services, 55% of respondents admit they do it regularly. Others (31%) said they paid for papers a few times (1-3) when academic overload with lack of time came by.

At the same time, 14% of students from those coming to Writing-Help’s chat indicated they would never pay for essays because of ethics. Answering the question, “How can we help you?” they said they came to the chat because of curiosity.

students cheat on assignments and exams

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Adjusting to an Online Cheating Environment

By shoellis

By: Sierra President, Ethics and Policy Intern

Today, cheating is easier than ever. Regardless of its ease, cheating is still frowned upon in most traditional academic settings and will lead to negative consequences if caught. And yet, people continue to cheat. The recent advancement of artificial intelligence (AI), an overload of online resources, and a lack of student understanding regarding academic policies make it more likely that students will cheat and get away with it. Since we are in a digital age, where notebooks are replaced with screens and pencils are traded for keyboards, academics must find ways to regulate the use of these new technologies. If they don’t, learning and integrity may be put on the back burner while students still reap the benefit of their ill-gotten degrees.

What is cheating?

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, cheating is defined as “to deprive of something valuable by the use of deceit or fraud.” [1] However, this blog is focused on cheating in an academic environment. Many universities have their definitions for cheating and typically consider it academic dishonesty.

For instance, the Office of Student Conduct website says, “Generally, academic misconduct can be thought of as any behavior that involves the giving, taking, or presenting of information by a student that unethically or fraudulently aids the student or another on any work which is to be considered in the determination of a grade or the completion of academic requirements or the enhancement of that student’s record or academic career.” [2]

The website also describes the most common forms of cheating, which include:

  • Copying from another assignment or test,
  • Collaborating with others on an assignment with the professor has required independent work,
  • Using outside resources when completing an assignment or test,
  • Falsifying test answers or grades. [3]

Under its Code of Student Conduct, NC State also expands its definition of cheating to account for technological advances. Specifically, the code says, “Using materials, equipment, or assistance in connection with an assignment, examination, or other academic exercise which have not been authorized by the faculty member, including but not limited to notes, calculator, or other technology.” [4]

Many universities nationwide have policies like NC State’s. Students should acknowledge these definitions, but educators must also recognize the benefits of using online resources.

Why are students cheating?

According to the International Center for Academic Integrity, 68 percent of undergraduate students say they have cheated on their assignments. [5] It might seem obvious why students cheat, but the University of Buffalo’s Office of Academic Integrity released a list that describes multiple reasons why students cheat, including some that may not immediately come to mind. [6] This list includes:

  • Poor time management,
  • Wanting to help friends,
  • Fear of failure,
  • Because everyone else is doing it,
  • Unmonitored environment or weak assignment design, and
  • Lack of academic policy understanding.

In an article published in The Chronicle of Higher Education , Owen Kichizo Terry expanded on the reasoning as to why students cheat by saying that the emergence of AI, like ChatGPT, makes it harder to get caught. [7] In the article, he provided a blueprint for how ChatGPT can be used to write an essay without detection. Terry argued, “In reality, it’s very easy to use AI to do the lion’s share of the thinking while still submitting work that looks like your own.” He said that ChatGPT can give students multiple ideas for a singular prompt. So, if a student uses one of the chatbot’s options and changes the words, then a professor may not think twice about who wrote it.

Kathryn Hulick wrote a ScienceNews article arguing that since ChatGPT and similar programs create new material, it is hard to consider plagiarism because plagiarism is when someone else’s existing work is copied without credit. Hulick also argued that, while there are many illegitimate uses for the technology, AI can also help with writing, like how calculators help with math, and Google helps find facts. Hulick also said that ChatGPT, for example, can help students struggling with sentence structure and grammar. [8] It is likely that when universities do not have policies about tools like chatbots that use AI, students may not see it as an issue to use them for assignments. While most universities are actively developing their AI policies, professors have recommended that students unsure about when and how to use AI should come to them for a conversation. This is particularly important since students may not realize the potential negative impacts of using AI.

What are the punishments for cheating?

Punishments for cheating can vary based on the assignment, professor, and academic institution. Ironically, I asked ChatGPT what can happen if someone cheats on an assignment. ChatGPT outlined several penalties that universities could require for cheating, which include:

  • Receiving a failing grade
  • Academic probation
  • Loss of privileges (access to campus facilities or activities)
  • A note on the student’s permanent record
  • Required completion of an academic integrity course
  • Suspension or expulsion
  • Legal action

It is important to note that ChatGPT only provided an overview of the possible penalties, meaning that it is possible for a student not to receive any punishment or to receive something that is not on this list. Each professor, department, and university has a different way of handling cheating, some of which may include a warning system.

In 2020, Georgia Tech had a cheating scandal when it was discovered that multiple students in an online physics class were using Chegg to get complete answers to their final exam. [9] Chegg is a company that provides digital homework help. Since users can freely post on the website, the answers to some assignments are posted in their entirety, giving students another way to cheat. The physics class received an email stating that if they admitted to using Chegg, they would be offered a second chance to take the exam. If a student did not admit to cheating but was found to have been using Chegg during the exam, they were reported to the Dean’s Office for Academic Misconduct and recommended to fail the course. Similar Chegg investigations were also underway at Texas A&M and Boston University. [10] Chegg states in their honor code that they do not condone the use of their website for cheating and will act against anyone who violates this, which should deter students from these actions. [11]

Jarrod Morgan, the founder of online test proctoring site ProctorU, said finances are a huge stressor for college students. [12] The possibility of having to repeat a course and pay for it again can add to their stress.

How can professors and administrators limit cheating?

The easy answer is to bring back in-person paper and pencil tests. However, the ease of using technology in classrooms makes this an unlikely option. As of 2023, 87 percent of classrooms globally use digital teaching practices. [13] There is now an “arms race” between technological advances that make cheating easier for students and technologies meant to detect or prevent cheating. Below are some tools and initiatives that can help educators monitor online cheating.

Vicky Harmon, the instructional design and manager of professional development at Arizona State University-Tempe, said, “If a student is going to do it, they’re going to do it, but we try to make it as difficult as possible.” [14] As a result of professors trying to manage cheating concerns, below are some helpful tools:

  • Online Test Proctoring which monitors and records a student’s test taking to ensure outside materials aren’t used.
  • Plagiarism Software which helps professors cross reference written assignments with possibly plagiarized information.
  • AI Detection Software is discussed more in-depth in Ethics of College Students Using ChatGPT
  • Lockdown browsers require students to download software on their computers, which limits the number of browsers that the student can open while they are taking exams.

AI Advancement Initiatives, Guidelines and Policies

Aside from using software to detect and prevent cheating, many universities are making students and faculty aware of changes in AI.

In Fall of 2023, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill created the UNC-Chapel Hill Generative AI Committee to help students and staff adapt to AI. This committee included a broad range of faculty and staff members and provided guidance for employees and students about how to use AI in classroom, research, and administrative work. This guidance outlines the following main points about the use of AI in teaching and class assignments:

  • Students should only use AI to help them think, not to complete assignments,
  • AI should be used responsibly and ethically,
  • Students are fully responsible for their submitted work and cannot blame AI for anything wrong or false,
  • Students should document any time they use AI,
  • Professors reserve the right to change specific AI guidelines depending on the assignment/exam, and
  • Confidential or personal information should not be put into AI tools.

UNC-Chapel Hill also has a “Carolina AI Literacy” initiative, which currently provides three instructional videos for students on:

  • AI prompting and thinking,
  • AI misinformation and biases, and
  • AI plagiarism and citation. [15]

UNC-Chapel Hill also has Generative AI Training Modules for faculty members. These modules are split into these categories:

  • Module 1 – Introduction to Generative AI
  • Module 2 – The Art & Science of Prompting AI
  • Module 3 – Teaching with AI
  • Module 4 – Ensuring Academic Integrity with AI
  • Module 5 – Launching Your AI Trajectory [16]

The UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Center provides tips that explain what generative AI is, how it can be used in education, and what the downsides of it can be. [17]

What is the takeaway?

In summary, there is no way around it: technology-based school learning is here to stay. Instead of trying to avoid it, professors need to be upfront with students as early as possible about what is and what is not accepted.

Professors should also take advantage of the online tools that are available to help them in their professional duties, including monitoring cheating.

With the quick emergence of AI, students may find out about new platforms before a professor can give the okay on its usage. To combat this, universities need to create and continuously update initiatives regarding AI. As a result of the fast-paced evolution of AI, UNC-Chapel Hill uses recommendations and best practices about AI usage, but in the future, this may shift towards requiring certain behavior through policy. It is also important for students and faculty alike to cooperate and communicate during this process since this new way of learning is new for everyone.

[1] Cheat Definition & Meaning – Merriam-Webster

[2] Academic Integrity: Overview | Office of Student Conduct (ncsu.edu)

[3] Academic Misconduct | Office of Student Conduct (ncsu.edu)

[4] POL 11.35.01 – Code of Student Conduct – Policies, Regulations & Rules (ncsu.edu)

[5] Think Twice Before Cheating in Online Courses (usnews.com)

[6] Common Reasons Students Cheat – Office of Academic Integrity – University at Buffalo

[7] I’m a Student. You Have No Idea How Much We’re Using ChatGPT. (chronicle.com)

[8] How ChatGPT and similar AI will disrupt education (sciencenews.org)

[9] Georgia Tech warns physics students who cheated: Confess or fail (ajc.com)

[10] Texas A&M investigating ‘large scale’ cheating case as universities see more academic misconduct in era of online classes – ABC13 Houston

[11] Honor Code | Chegg

[12] How Cheating in College Hurts Students (usnews.com)

[13] What Percentage of Schools Use Technology in the Classroom? (techyinspire.com)

[14] Think Twice Before Cheating in Online Courses (usnews.com)

[15] Videos | Carolina AI Literacy (unc.edu)

[16] Generative AI Training Modules (tarheels.live)

[17] Generative AI in Academic Writing – The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (unc.edu)

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8 Ways to Prevent Students From Cheating With AI

Image representing the power of AI.

Academic integrity has been a fundamental aspect of higher education for years, but with the rise of AI tools comes new barriers for instructors to maintain it. The temptation for students to cheat using AI has grown, making it essential for educators to adopt innovative strategies to combat it effectively. In this article, we’ll explore various methods to prevent students from cheating with AI, with help from Cengage online learning platforms such as WebAssign , MindTap , CNOWv2 , OWLv2 and SAM .

Educate students on your school’s definition of cheating

Do your students understand exactly what is considered “cheating”? Rather than assume students fully understand what cheating entails, reinforce your school’s honor code including the acceptable use of AI technology. This can be achieved through your syllabus, workshops, orientation sessions or online modules. By promoting awareness and understanding, your students are more likely to uphold academic integrity.

Tip: If you’re using WebAssign , you can assign the Academic Integrity assignment found in the  Math Success toolkit to help students understand and reflect on the definition of academic integrity.

Remind students of your academic integrity policy with an honor code pledge

Before your exam begins, or within your exam, add a question requiring students to confirm that they will not cheat or commit academic dishonesty throughout the exam. Within this question, you may choose to include examples of cheating—including the use of AI—and reminders of the consequences of committing academic dishonesty. This will serve as a real-time reminder of how serious academic integrity is to your course, and the implications of using outside resources.

Tip: In WebAssign , you can access an Honor Code question template by searching question ID: 4625294 to use as a starting point.

Rethink how you assess learning

One of the key strategies to combat cheating with AI tools is to rethink how you assess student learning. Instead of relying solely on multiple-choice questions and easily searchable answers, consider alternative assessment methods that truly gauge a student’s understanding.

Incorporate questions with visual or interactive elements

Rather than assigning a multiple-choice question, utilize questions that have a visual or interactive component. Incorporating visual elements, such as images, graphs, videos or diagrams, into assessments can deter cheating as students can’t copy these elements into AI tools. These elements require students to analyze, interpret, visualize and sometimes interact with a concept. This is not easily replicable by AI tools. Visual questions also add depth to the assessment process.

Assign projects

In courses like Statistics, Physics and Chemistry, among others, projects can be an excellent assessment tool. These real-world, hands-on assignments require students to apply their knowledge in a practical context, making it harder for AI to provide answers. Encouraging critical thinking and problem-solving skills through projects ensures students truly grasp the concepts.

“I use projects that we complete in steps, so I see their work piece by piece.” – Angela Nino, Dallas College

Leverage open-ended questions

Use a mix of question types, including open-ended, scenario-based, and critical thinking or problem-solving questions. Open-ended questions, in particular, force students to demonstrate their true understanding, as they cannot rely on AI-generated responses.

Assigning tasks that are tailored to each student’s unique experiences, interests, or background can significantly reduce cheating through AI tools. For example, ask them to correlate the concept to an experience in their real life. When assignments are personalized, it becomes challenging for students to find pre-generated content online.

Ask students to upload their work

If your course requires students to complete multiple steps, or think independently to get the answer, this strategy is for you. You can assign file upload questions in MindTap , WebAssign , CNOWv2 and SAM. These questions prompt students to upload pictures or documents containing their work from the exam. You’ll want to inform students that they will be required to submit their work at the end of the exam by mentioning it in class or in the instructions of your assignment.

Tip: If you’re delivering a timed test or LockDown browser for your exam, you should create a follow-up assignment that doesn’t contain these restrictions and ask your students to submit their work there. This will ensure they can upload a file and won’t use up any of their test time.

Consider new ways to deliver assignments to students

In addition to the types of content you provide to students, you should also reconsider how you’re delivering your assignments.

Use timed assignments

Setting reasonable time limits for exams and assignments is an effective way to thwart cheating with AI tools. When students have limited time, it becomes more challenging to rely on AI models for all their answers. Timed assignments encourage them to focus on understanding and applying the material rather than seeking shortcuts.

Tip: All Cengage platforms such as WebAssign, MindTap, CNOWv2, OWLv2 and SAM offer timed tests.

Schedule frequent assessments

Frequent assessments throughout the course can reduce the temptation to cheat with AI tools. By breaking the course into smaller, regular assessments, students are less likely to procrastinate and resort to cheating to cope with the pressure of one big final exam.

The great thing about using Cengage online learning platforms is you don’t have to create all these additional assignments on your own! You can use pre-built assignments or questions to easily create additional assessments for students.

In the age of AI tools, combating cheating in higher education requires creative and proactive strategies. By rethinking assessment methods, emphasizing the honor code pledge and implementing personalized, time-bound and visual assessments, you can reduce the allure of cheating with AI tools. Plus, you can save time in doing so, with the help of Cengage online learning platforms.

Download the Cheating and Academic Dishonesty eBook to learn more about how to stop cheating in your course.

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Faculty as Agents of Change

Sage musings: minimizing and dealing with academic dishonesty.

If it seems to you that academic dishonesty is rampant, and has gotten worse over time, you're not imagining it. "Research in high schools shows that two thirds of students cheat on tests, and 90 percent cheat on homework. The figures are almost as high among college students. Furthermore, it is clear that rates of cheating have gone up over the past three decades" (Stephens, 2004). Of course, that doesn't mean that each of those students cheats on every test or homework assignment. And there are degrees of academic dishonesty, some more galling than others. But, statistically speaking, chances are that many of your students will cheat on assignments or exams this term and every term (e.g. McBurney, 1996; Stephens, 2004).

That's disheartening, isn't it? Dealing with academic dishonesty is the thing I miss the least, now that I am no longer teaching. Fortunately, there is some good news. There are ways to decrease students' motivation to cheat. Here are several strategies that have emerged from the research on this topic:

Strategies for minimizing cheating

  • "Give students images of people who don't cut corners: scientists who discover things they don't expect because they approach their work with an impeccable respect for truth and a genuinely open mind; business people who exemplify integrity even when it seems like it might cost them something. But don't preach. Take seriously the fact that, in some contexts, being consistently honest can be hard" (Stephens, 2004).
  • Communicate your policy for dealing with academic dishonesty; put it in your syllabus (McBurney, 1996; Michael and Williams, 2013). I used to make a point of reviewing it in class, early in the term, and mentioning it again before exams and major assignment due dates. Make sure that your policy is consistent with your institution's. In addition, let students know what you think about academic dishonesty, and why. What values are behind your policy?
  • Remind students that academic dishonesty hurts the person who is cheating. It sabotages their own efforts to learn information, concepts, and skills that they are paying a lot of money to learn.
  • If you college has an honor code, incorporate it (Pope, 2014). One college I taught at had students write it on major assignments and sign them; we also printed it on exams and had students sign them.
  • Make explicit connections between your courses and students interests, so that they understand why they should learn the material (Stephens, 2004; Gooblar, 2014).
  • Structure bigger assignments so that students get feedback on early stages of their work -- that is, formative assessment (Michael and Williams, 2013; Pope, 2014). In addition, you might consider allowing students to re-do smaller assignments on which they don't earn a passing grade, or to correct mistakes they made on tests, to earn back some of the points they lost (Pope, 2014). This ensures that assignments are learning opportunities, and re-focuses the students' attention from grades to learning.
  • Consider whether to lift restrictions on collaboration, particularly for homework assignments, since research indicates that collaboration supports student learning (Stephens, 2004).
  • Let students know that you think they can succeed in your class, without cheating (McBurney, 1996). Sometimes students are motivated to cheat by a fear of failure.
  • Consider assessing student learning via a variety of different mechanisms, so that students have many ways to show you that they have learned the material (Gooblar, 2014; Pope, 2014).
  • Make assessments fair and well-aligned with the assignments in your courses (Stephens, 2004).
  • Clarify what constitutes academic dishonesty.
  • Not every faculty member has the same policies; for example, some encourage collaboration of homework assignments, while others forbid it. Let your students know what you expect from them.
  • This is important for every student, but can be especially important for international students. Cultural norms vary about what "counts" as academic dishonesty; behavior that is completely acceptable in some countries may be unacceptable to you, in your classroom. But how will international students know that, if you don't tell them?
  • I think it's safe to say that the vast majority of college students know they shouldn't plagiarize. But I have had some very illuminating conversations with students about just what exactly "counts" as plagiarism. If you have writing assignments in your courses, teach students what plagiarism is and how to avoid it. Even better, structure writing assignments so that they are personalized, making it very hard to plagiarize (McBurney, 1996). I used to give my students a plagiarism exercise at the beginning of the term. It had 10 paired examples of source text and how it was incorporated into a writing assignment. Students had to identify which examples were plagiarized, and fix the ones that were. Some were pretty blatant -- copied word for word -- while others were more subtle. Jack Dougherty, at Trinity College, has a different approach: he gives students an assignment requiring them to plagiarize a text several different ways (Gooblar, 2014).
  • Make it harder to get away with cheating.
  • Take control of the testing environment, and keep your eyes open (McBurney, 1996). There are all kinds of ways to cheat on exams.
  • Use http://turnitin.com or similar programs to catch plagiarism.

Nonetheless, some of your students will commit academic dishonesty. I won't say I did everything right, but I followed most of these practices when I taught, and I still had obvious cases of academic dishonesty almost every term. How should you respond when that happens? I know some faculty choose to just let it go -- after all, the student really is cheating himself or herself out of an opportunity to learn, and there will eventually be natural consequences for that. But that approach never sat well with me. Assuming you plan to penalize students for academic dishonesty, here are the recommendations I gleaned from the literature on this subject:

Strategies for dealing with students who have cheated

  • Be consistent with your stated and written policies (Michael and Williams, 2013).
  • Document what happened. If there are witnesses, ask them to give you a written account of what they saw (McBurney, 1996).
  • First try to settle the matter informally. Talk with the student outside of class, show them the evidence you have that they have violated your policy, and tell them what penalty you will apply. If the student owns up to his/her actions, consider having the student sign a document describing what happened and how the two of you have resolved the situation. Keep a copy of this for your records. You might even give a copy to your department chair or dean.... If the student is in the habit of committing academic dishonesty, having multiple cases documented can lead to disciplinary action by your institution (McBurney, 1996).
  • Be prepared to follow your institution's guidelines for more formal action, if necessary.

Have you found ways to cut down on the incidents of academic dishonesty in your classes? Do you have a favorite way of dealing with academic dishonesty? Tell us about it!

Gooblar, David. Why Students Cheat -- and 3 Ways to Stop Them. February 19, 2014. Retrieved from https://chroniclevitae.com/news/341-why-students-cheat-and-3-ways-to-stop-them , March 3, 2017.

McBurney, Donald. January 1, 1996. Cheating: Preventing and Dealing with Academic Dishonesty. Association for Psychological Science Observer. Retrieved from https://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/cheating-preventing-and-dealing-with-academic-dishonesty#.WLmPJxiZM_V , March 3, 2017.

Michael, Timothy B., and Melissa A. Williams (2013). Student Equity: Discouraging Cheating in Online Courses. Administrative Issues Journal: Education, Practice, and Research; v.3, n.2. Retrieved from https://dc.swosu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1076&context=aij , March 3, 2017.

Pope, Denise. April 11, 2014. Academic Integrity: Cheat or Be Cheated? Retrieved from https://www.edutopia.org/blog/academic-integrity-cheat-or-be-cheated-denise-pope , March 3, 2017.

Stephens, Jason. May, 2004. Justice or Just Us? What to Do about Cheating. Retrieved from https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/582 , March 3, 2017.

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AI Cheating: Tips to Avoid and Detect

In an era where technology continues to shape the way we learn and assess knowledge, the battle against academic dishonesty has taken on a new form. As students increasingly turn to artificial intelligence for a helping hand, the need to stay one step ahead of AI cheating methods has become more crucial than ever. From exams to assignments and essays, this article unveils the strategies and tools to detect and prevent AI-powered cheating, ensuring a fair and honest educational environment for all.

students cheat on assignments and exams

Introduction

As we navigate the digital era, the intersection of education and technology continues to evolve, presenting both opportunities and challenges. One such challenge that has emerged prominently is AI cheating. In this article, we will delve into the complexities of AI cheating, its implications, and strategies for prevention and detection, to ensure the integrity of our academic institutions in the face of this modern challenge.

Brief Overview of AI Cheating

AI cheating involves leveraging sophisticated artificial intelligence tools to unduly gain an advantage in academic settings, undermining the essence of learning and evaluation. It manifests in various forms - from using AI-powered applications to solve complex mathematical problems, employing language models for writing essays or assignments, to even using advanced tools for cheating in online examinations. The ingenuity of these methods makes detection and prevention increasingly difficult.

Scope of the Problem in Academic Settings

The scope of AI cheating is not confined to a specific academic level or field; it's pervasive across high schools, colleges, and universities worldwide. The ease of access to AI tools, coupled with the rapid transition to online learning, has created an environment where AI cheating can thrive if left unchecked. The convenience and anonymity provided by digital platforms have inadvertently fostered a climate where students may be tempted to exploit these advanced tools for dishonest means.

The widespread prevalence of AI cheating not only compromises the integrity of academic evaluations but also undermines the educational process as a whole. It diminishes the value of authentic learning and discourages the development of critical thinking skills, which are vital for academic and professional success.

Addressing this issue requires a comprehensive understanding of its extent and the development of effective strategies tailored to the evolving landscape of AI-empowered cheating. By staying informed and proactive, we can safeguard the sanctity of academic settings in this digital age.

Understanding AI Cheating

What is ai cheating simply.

AI cheating is simply when students use advanced computer programs, also known as artificial intelligence, to dishonestly complete their schoolwork or exams while pretending that the work is their own. In essence, AI cheating refers to the misuse of artificial intelligence technologies or tools to gain an unfair advantage in academic endeavors. This misuse can range from simpler tasks, like using AI-based calculators for complex equations, to more complex applications, such as employing AI-powered language models to generate essays or assignments.

Explanation of How AI Tools Can Be Used for Cheating

Artificial Intelligence, designed to mimic human intellect, can perform tasks usually requiring human intelligence. While this capability opens up numerous beneficial applications, it can also be manipulated for dishonest purposes in educational settings.

AI-powered tools, known as 'essay mills,' can generate well-structured, coherent essays on various topics with minimal human input. Similarly, advanced problem-solving applications can instantly solve complex equations or problems, offering students an unfair advantage. AI-driven language translation tools and 'paraphrasing' tools can present translated or rephrased content as original work, while some AI tools can even manipulate screen sharing or remote proctoring tools during online exams.

Examples of AI Cheating in Exams, Assignments, and Essays

In the context of essay writing, students may use AI tools to generate full essays from a few keywords or a basic outline. These tools can produce content that is well-structured and coherent, potentially bypassing plagiarism detection software.

During exams or while completing assignments , students can use AI problem-solving tools to solve complex equations or problems in subjects like mathematics or physics, gaining an unfair advantage. Using AI translation tools, students can translate text from one language to another and present the translated content as their own work.

Moreover, AI 'paraphrasing' tools can help students rephrase copied content to make it appear unique and bypass plagiarism detection.

In the case of online exams, sophisticated AI tools can offer real-time assistance by solving questions or providing direct answers. Some of these AI tools can manipulate screen sharing or remote proctoring, making cheating hard to detect.

The misuse of these AI tools in various ways underscores the urgent need for comprehensive strategies to tackle AI cheating in academic settings.

The Evolution of AI Cheating

The progression of ai cheating over the years.

AI cheating has not sprung up overnight. Its roots can be traced back to the inception of digital learning tools, but it has evolved significantly over the years, hand in hand with advancements in technology.

AI cheating has grown in tandem with the evolution of technology. In the early days of digital learning tools, instances of cheating were relatively simple. Students might have used basic calculators for tasks meant to be completed manually or turned to the internet to find answers to assignment questions. But as technology advanced, so did the methods of cheating.

Over the years, the emergence of more sophisticated AI tools has allowed the scale and complexity of cheating to escalate. For instance, the development of AI calculators capable of solving complex mathematical equations or AI programs that could generate relatively simple content opened new avenues for academic dishonesty.

B. Recent Advancements in AI That May Contribute to Cheating

In recent years, AI technology has seen exponential growth, becoming more sophisticated and capable. This has inadvertently led to an increase in the potential for AI cheating.

Today, AI can write comprehensive essays, solve intricate problems, and even mimic a student's writing style. AI-powered language models, for instance, can generate complex, high-quality essays on a given topic, making it incredibly difficult for educators to distinguish between a student's original work and AI-generated content.

Moreover, some AI tools have been designed to defeat basic security measures in online examinations. For instance, certain AI-powered applications can provide answers, mimic human-like typing patterns during online tests, and even take the test on behalf of the student, making the cheating process much more covert.

As AI technology continues to evolve, the potential for its misuse in academic settings is a growing concern. It is crucial to understand these risks and develop effective strategies to counteract them.

Major AI Tools Used for Cheating

As we delve deeper into the world of AI-assisted cheating, it's important to understand some of the key tools that students may misuse. Here's an overview of some of the most commonly used AI tools and how they can contribute to academic dishonesty.

AI-Powered Essay Generators

These tools, also known as 'essay mills,' can generate well-structured and coherent essays on various topics based on a few keywords or a simple outline. This allows students to submit high-quality essays without having to do the actual writing.

Examples: EssaySoft, Articoolo, Dr Assignment Auto Writer

Advanced Problem-Solving Applications

AI-powered applications that solve complex equations or problems can give students an unfair advantage during exams or assignments. These tools can handle everything from calculus equations to complex physics problems, providing instant solutions that students are supposed to derive themselves.

Examples: Wolfram Alpha, Microsoft Math Solver, Photomath

AI Translation and Paraphrasing Tools

AI-driven language translation tools can help students translate text from one language to another, and then present the translated content as their own work. Similarly, AI paraphrasing tools can rephrase copied content to make it appear unique, helping students bypass plagiarism detection software.

Examples: Google Translate, Quillbot, SpinnerChief

AI Proctoring Manipulation Tools

In the context of online exams, certain sophisticated AI tools can offer real-time assistance by solving questions or providing direct answers. Some of these AI tools can even manipulate screen sharing or remote proctoring, making it challenging for invigilators to detect any wrongdoing.

AI-Based Writing Style Mimicry Tools

These tools can analyze a student's writing style and then generate content that closely resembles it, making it hard to differentiate between a student's original work and AI-generated content.

AI Screen Sharing and Webcam Manipulation Tools

These AI tools can manipulate screen sharing or webcam feeds during online exams, presenting a pre-recorded feed or altering the shared screen's content in real time.

Advanced Plagiarism Bypassing Tools

AI algorithms can subtly alter copied text by changing words or phrases, making it difficult for plagiarism detection software to identify the original source.

AI-Based Human Behavior Mimicry Tools

Some tools can mimic human behavior during online exams, like typing patterns or mouse movements, making it harder for proctoring software to detect cheating.

Optical Character Recognition (OCR) Tools

OCR tools are designed to recognize text within images or scanned documents, which can then be edited or searched. In the context of academic cheating, students can use OCR tools to extract text from secured PDFs or images, which may not be accessible for copying otherwise.

For instance, a student could use an OCR tool to extract text from a copyrighted textbook or a secured PDF and then use a paraphrasing tool to alter the extracted text, presenting it as their own work. This process could bypass plagiarism detection software, since the original source text may not be easily accessible for comparison.

Examples: Adobe Scan, Google Lens, Tesseract OCR

Understanding these tools and their potential misuse is the first step toward developing effective strategies to combat AI cheating. As AI technology continues to evolve, new tools will undoubtedly emerge, and educators must stay informed to stay ahead of this issue.

V. Impact of AI Cheating

The consequences of AI cheating extend beyond the immediate unfair advantage it provides to individual students. The implications ripple out, impacting academic integrity, educators, and educational institutions as a whole.

A. Undermining Academic Integrity

Academic integrity forms the foundation of any educational institution, fostering an environment that values honesty, trust, fairness, respect, and responsibility. When students resort to AI cheating, they erode these values. The use of AI to generate essays or solve complex problems masks the true academic abilities of students, leading to a lack of trust in the authenticity of their work. Moreover, it fosters a culture where dishonesty is overlooked, which is detrimental to the overall learning environment.

B. Consequences for Students

While AI cheating might offer immediate benefits like higher grades or less study time, it comes with long-term consequences for students. They miss out on the opportunity to learn and develop critical skills that are integral to their academic and professional growth. Over-reliance on AI can also create a dependency that leaves students ill-prepared to handle tasks without AI assistance. Further, if caught, students might face severe penalties including failure in the course, expulsion, or lasting damage to their academic reputation.

C. Consequences for Educators and Institutions

For educators, AI cheating makes it challenging to accurately assess a student's understanding and progress, leading to skewed results that don’t reflect their true capabilities. This can also undermine an educator's efforts to promote and encourage honest academic practices.

For institutions, widespread AI cheating can damage their credibility and the value of the degrees they confer. It can also lead to increased scrutiny from accreditation bodies and potential legal complications in cases of copyright infringement or other violations.

In sum, while AI has tremendous potential to enhance education, its misuse for cheating poses serious challenges that need to be addressed to maintain the sanctity and purpose of education.

VI. Legal and Ethical Implications

The misuse of AI technologies for cheating in academic settings raises significant legal and ethical questions. It's essential to understand and address these implications to ensure a fair and equitable educational landscape.

A. Legal Aspects of AI Cheating

Legally, AI cheating can fall into murky waters. On one hand, the misuse of AI tools can involve copyright infringement, particularly when content from copyrighted sources is copied and rephrased without permission. On the other hand, AI cheating can potentially violate academic integrity policies, leading to disciplinary actions ranging from course failure to expulsion.

Moreover, the use of AI tools to manipulate proctoring software or to create false identities during online exams could potentially lead to legal repercussions under computer fraud and abuse laws. However, the rapidly evolving nature of AI technology often outpaces existing legal frameworks, making it challenging to address these issues adequately.

B. Ethical Considerations

From an ethical standpoint, AI cheating raises concerns about fairness, honesty, and responsibility. Students using AI tools to gain an unfair advantage violate the fundamental principle of equity in education, undermining the efforts of those who work honestly. This dishonesty erodes trust among peers, educators, and institutions.

AI cheating also fosters a culture of dependency and short-termism, where the focus shifts from genuine learning and skill development to immediate results. This approach can be detrimental in the long run, as students may fail to develop critical skills needed for their future careers and personal growth.

Moreover, the misuse of AI tools raises questions about the responsibilities of AI developers and providers. Should they be held accountable for the misuse of their tools? What measures should they take to prevent misuse? These are complex issues that require ongoing dialogue and consideration.

In conclusion, addressing the legal and ethical implications of AI cheating is crucial in maintaining the integrity of educational institutions and ensuring a fair and equitable learning environment.

VIII. Comprehensive Strategies to Prevent AI Cheating

A. honor code.

Establishing an honor code that explicitly forbids the use of AI or any other unauthorized assistance can provide a fundamental ethical guideline for examinations or assignments. This code should clearly define what constitutes cheating and outline the consequences of any violations.

B. Changing Assessment Strategies

Focus on assessment methods where AI assistance would provide little to no benefit. This could include:

  • Open-Book Tests: These tests are based on understanding and application rather than memorization. The answers aren't easily accessible by an AI because they require critical thinking and personal interpretation.
  • In-Person Proctored Exams: In a supervised environment, it becomes much harder for a student to use AI to cheat. However, this is more difficult to implement in online or distance learning environments.
  • Oral Exams: These require real-time interaction between the examiner and the student, making it very difficult for an AI to help.
  • Project-Based Assignments: These are long-term tasks that require a significant amount of personal work and creativity, making it hard for AI to effectively provide assistance.

C. Use of Proctoring Software

Proctoring software can monitor a student's activity during an online exam, including keystrokes, mouse movements, and web browsing activities. Advanced proctoring software can also detect the presence of additional software or applications running in the background, like an AI program.

D. Randomize Questions and Answers

Many online learning platforms have the option to randomize the order of questions and answers. This can make it more difficult for AI programs to find and select the correct response.

E. Use Detailed Questions

AI models, as of my knowledge cutoff in 2021, struggle with complex, multi-step problems and questions that require deep understanding or synthesis of information. Therefore, asking detailed, context-heavy questions can make it harder for AI to provide the correct response.

F. Monitor Time Taken

If answers to complex questions are submitted too quickly, this could indicate AI assistance. AIs can generate responses much faster than a human typically would.

G. Plagiarism Detection Software.

These tools can be used to detect if a piece of text produced by a student matches other sources too closely, including AI-generated content.

H. Data Analysis

Unusual patterns in answer submissions, such as many students making the same unusual mistakes or writing in a similar style, could indicate AI use.

These comprehensive strategies can significantly aid in curbing the AI cheating phenomenon in educational settings.

IX. Detecting AI Cheating

A. role of plagiarism detection software.

Plagiarism detection software plays a critical role in identifying AI cheating. These tools can compare a student's work against vast databases of existing content, including AI-generated text. Advanced plagiarism checkers can even identify subtle changes in language or sentence structures, thus helping to flag potential instances of AI-assisted paraphrasing or translation.

B. Importance of Screen Recording and Online Proctoring Tools

Screen recording and online proctoring tools are essential in detecting AI cheating during online exams. By recording a student's screen activity and using advanced algorithms to monitor unusual behavior, these tools can effectively identify potential cheating attempts. For instance, if a student is frequently switching between tabs or applications during an exam, it could indicate the use of AI assistance.

C. Introduction to Stylometry and its Potential for Detecting AI-Generated Text

Stylometry, the study of linguistic style, can be a promising tool in the fight against AI cheating. AI-generated text often has unique linguistic patterns that are discernible from human writing. By analyzing these patterns, stylometry can help identify AI-generated text, even if it has been paraphrased or restructured.

D. Importance of Manual Review and Understanding Student Writing Styles

Despite advancements in technology, manual review remains a crucial tool in detecting AI cheating. Educators who are familiar with their students' writing styles can often detect sudden or unexplained changes in these styles. This approach, however, requires time and effort from educators and is more effective in smaller classrooms where educators can get more familiar with individual students' writing styles. It is important to combine manual review with the other technological tools mentioned for a more effective detection strategy.

IX. The Role of AI in Cheating Prevention and Detection

How ai can be used to prevent and detect cheating.

Ironically, while AI has been a boon for cheaters, it also holds the key to preventing and detecting cheating. With advances in machine learning and data analytics, AI can analyze patterns of behavior and flag suspicious activity. For example, AI can be used in proctoring software to track eye movements, facial expressions, and keyboard strokes to detect anomalies during online exams.

Moreover, AI-based text analysis tools can identify subtle changes in a student's writing style, indicating potential AI-assisted cheating. AI can also be trained to identify the unique patterns in AI-generated text, thus helping to expose students who misuse AI for academic dishonesty.

The Potential Future of AI in Maintaining Academic Integrity

As AI technology continues to evolve, its role in maintaining academic integrity is set to expand. Future AI systems might be able to identify a wider range of cheating tactics, from sophisticated AI-generated essays to the misuse of AI in online exams. AI could also provide personalized learning resources for each student, reducing the need for cheating by addressing individual learning gaps.

X. Role of Educational Institutions

Proactive role of schools, colleges, and universities in curbing ai cheating.

Educational institutions have a crucial role to play in curbing AI cheating. They need to be proactive in educating students about the ethical implications of AI cheating and the potential consequences for academic and professional careers. Regular workshops and awareness campaigns can be organized to address the issue.

Moreover, institutions can invest in advanced cheating detection tools, including AI-based proctoring software and plagiarism checkers, to maintain academic integrity. They should also strive to stay updated with the latest advancements in AI and cheating tactics to ensure their prevention and detection methods remain effective.

Policies and Measures That Educational Institutions Can Implement

Institutions can implement strict policies against AI cheating, with clear consequences for those caught misusing AI. Such policies should be communicated clearly to all students.

Educators can also employ a variety of assessment strategies that make cheating difficult, such as open-book tests, in-person proctored exams, oral exams, and project-based assignments.

Lastly, institutions can collaborate with tech companies to develop more robust methods for detecting AI cheating and ensuring the fair use of technology in education.

XI. Parental and Guardian Involvement

Promoting academic integrity.

Parents and guardians play a pivotal role in shaping a child's character, including their understanding and appreciation of academic integrity. They can instill the values of honesty, hard work, and fairness from an early age. They should discuss the harmful effects of cheating, both on personal development and on academic and professional prospects. Parents can also lead by example, demonstrating ethical behavior in their own actions and decisions.

Keeping a Check on the Misuse of AI Tools

In the digital age, parental oversight extends to the online activities of their children. Parents and guardians can keep a check on the use of AI tools by their children for academic purposes. This includes maintaining open communication about the appropriate use of AI and technology in general.

Moreover, they can monitor their child's study patterns and time spent on assignments or projects. If a task that generally takes several hours is completed in an unusually short time, it could be a sign of AI misuse.

Finally, parents and guardians can make use of parental control software to restrict access to certain AI tools and websites known for facilitating academic dishonesty. They can also encourage the use of AI for positive learning experiences, such as AI-based tutoring programs, thus showing their children the potential benefits of AI when used ethically and responsibly.

XIII. Moving Forward: The Future of AI and Academic Integrity

A. the positive role of ai in education.

While this article has primarily discussed the misuse of AI in academic settings, it's important to highlight the potential benefits of these technologies. From personalized learning programs that adapt to each student's needs to intelligent tutoring systems that provide instant feedback, AI has the potential to revolutionize education. It can facilitate distance learning, diversify teaching methods, and provide accessible education resources to those who may not have had them before. Thus, the goal is not to eliminate AI from education but to ensure its ethical use.

B. Future Developments in AI Cheating and Countermeasures

As AI technology continues to evolve, so too will the methods of AI cheating. AI models will become more sophisticated, and new forms of cheating may emerge. It's therefore crucial for educators, institutions, and software developers to stay ahead of the curve.

This may involve developing more advanced AI proctoring and plagiarism detection tools or leveraging AI itself to detect dishonest practices. For example, machine learning algorithms could be trained to identify AI-generated text or to detect patterns indicative of cheating in student data.

Similarly, assessment strategies may need to evolve. This could involve a greater emphasis on in-person exams, oral exams, or project-based assignments, where AI assistance is less effective.

XIV. Conclusion

In conclusion, tackling AI cheating is crucial in preserving the value of education in this rapidly advancing digital age. While AI offers significant benefits, its misuse in academic dishonesty threatens the integrity of the learning process.

The responsibility of combatting AI cheating is shared by educators, parents, students, and the wider society. Through promoting ethical AI use, creating cheat-resistant assessments, and employing advanced detection methods, we can ensure AI supports, not undermines, the educational journey.

In this era of AI, we must reinforce the importance of human effort and honesty in education. After all, AI can aid the learning process, but it should never replace the quest for knowledge and personal intellectual growth.

AI Cheating FAQs

What is ai cheating.

AI cheating is the use of artificial intelligence technologies to dishonestly gain an advantage in academic settings. It's like having a computer do your homework or take your test for you, and then pretending that you did it yourself.

This could involve using AI tools to complete assignments, generate essays, solve complex problems, or even manipulate online examination systems. AI cheating is a violation of academic integrity as it involves presenting AI-generated work as one's own, and it poses significant challenges to educators and institutions aiming to uphold fair and honest academic practices.

Can students cheat with ChatGPT?

Yes, it's technically possible for students to use ChatGPT to cheat on assignments or exams. ChatGPT can generate detailed responses to prompts, which could include essay questions or other types of assignments. However, using AI tools like ChatGPT in this way is considered a form of academic dishonesty. It's important for students to understand that using AI to complete their work not only undermines their own learning, but it's also likely against their school's code of conduct and could result in serious consequences.

Is the use of AI cheating?

The use of AI itself is not cheating. AI has many legitimate and beneficial uses in education, such as personalized learning, adaptive testing, and helping with accessibility. However, the misuse of AI to dishonestly complete assignments or exams is considered cheating. For example, using an AI tool to write an essay and then submitting it as your own work would be considered academic dishonesty. It's important to use AI responsibly and within the guidelines set by your educational institution.

How schools can stop students cheating with ChatGPT?

Educate Students: Make students aware of what constitutes cheating and the consequences of such actions. This includes using AI tools like ChatGPT to complete assignments.

Promote Academic Integrity : Encourage honest academic practices and create an environment that values original work and critical thinking.

Change Assessment Methods : Design tests and assignments in a way that requires critical thinking and personalized responses, which are harder for AI to generate.

Use Technology : Employ advanced plagiarism detection software and proctoring tools to identify any unusual patterns that might indicate AI use.

Policy and Consequences : Have clear policies regarding AI cheating and ensure they are enforced consistently.

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About this site:.

This site was a collaborative one-time project completed in 2017. Content was last updated in 2018 and many of the original content creators are no longer at RIT. For up to date support reach out to the appropriate department for your specific need: Academic Success Center , Center for Teaching & Learning , Faculty Career Development Team , RIT Libraries , University Writing Program .

Cheating comes in many forms. According to RIT's Student Academic Integrity Policy :

Cheating is any form of fraudulent or deceptive academic act, including falsification of data, possessing, providing, or using unapproved materials, sources, or tools for a project, exam, or body of work submitted for faculty evaluation. [1]

Methods students use to cheat can range from low-tech solutions such as copying from a neighbor's test to more high-tech methods involving innovative uses of available technologies. For instance, a student might try to store notes on a calculator, lookup answers on a smartphone, or listen to prerecorded solutions on an MP3 player. As new technologies become available (e.g. smartwatches) so do the potential tools students can manipulate to their advantage.

A quick internet search for methods of cheating will reveal a wide range of resources, how-to guides, and demonstrational videos that show students how to cheat on exams and class assignments. Being aware of some of the tools and techniques that exist is important for faculty when designing and evaluating class assignments.

RIT Libraries offers a workshop for faculty on High Tech Cheating . For more information, please email [email protected] .

Article Spinning

Originally designed as a technique for Search Engine Optimization (SEO), article spinning involves changing the writing of an article just enough to hide the fact that the content was copied from another work. This is usually accomplished by replacing words with synonyms or related terms. Another form of article spinning involves piecing together an article from multiple articles on the same topic.

While article spinning can be done manually, there are also many online tools that will "spin" an article on the writer's behalf. The result is typically a poorly written document that still needs to be edited by the paper's author.

Essay Banks and Paper Mills

Essay banks and paper mills give students the option of purchasing completed papers for class assignments. The exact service provided can vary. Essay banks typically resell prewritten papers on specific topics. In contrast, paper mills give students the option of having a unique paper crafted based on individual assignment criteria. Customers need to provide the site with general information such as a topic, due date, and article length so that a new, original work can be created. The higher the quality of the fraudulent work (and thus less likelihood of being caught), the more expensive the service.

Further Reading

  • Five Sneaky Plagiarist Tricks That Don't Work , Plagiarism Today , Jonathan Bailey, 2012
  • How Students Use Technology to Cheat and What Faculty Can Do About It , Information Systems Educators Conference, Lisa Z. Bain, 2014
  • The Shadow Scholar , Chronicle of Higher Education , Ed Dante, 2010
  • Plagiarism and the Web: Myths and Realities , Turnitin, 2011(free download)

[1] Rochester Institute of Technology. (2013, March 16). Student academic integrity policy . Retrieved from University Policies website: https://www.rit.edu/academicaffairs/policiesmanual/d080

students cheat on assignments and exams

Has your teen searched for the leaked exam papers online? Amount of students caught 'cheating' has doubled, here's everything you need to know - including consequences

In light of the exam paper leak online, Ofqual have announced the consequences for those found searching for them. This comes as the number of students found cheating has doubled in the last six years.

The season of exam stress is underway for parents and teens up and down the country. As a parent of someone sitting their exams, you might have researched the exam diet to make sure their brains are well fed, and have the top foods in your fridge that nutritionists assert will improve their performance. But have you broached the subject of cheating?

While nobody wants to believe their child might cheat, students studying the International Baccalaureate (IB) (find out what the IB is ) recently found exam questions had been leaked online. Taking advantage of time zone differences, several versions of papers were shared by those from different countries to encrypted messaging platform, Telegram. The IB officials insist the papers aren't legitimate, but created by students memorising exam questions.  

The leak has led to concerns of an upturn in teens searching for GSCE and A Level exam questions online, believing there won't be any consequences. The incident has also seen social media scammers selling fake questions and papers, suggesting they're real. Not only is searching for papers classed as malpractice, targeting revision towards counterfeit questions will be detrimental to results. 

Ofqual have responded to reports of students attempting to find leaked exam papers online, issuing a reminder that those caught doing this could be disqualified. Speaking to TES, Ofqual chief regulator Sir Ian Bauckham said: "Students have been working hard to prepare for their exams, and nobody wants them to miss out on their grades and qualifications."

He adds "Thankfully, most students are aware of the risks of malpractice and comply with the rules. It’s important that the rules are followed so that grades reflect what a student knows, understands and can do. Students should also be aware of the risks of exam papers on social media. Accounts claiming to sell this year’s exam papers are almost always scams. Students should report these accounts to teachers."

"Students should also be aware of the risks of exam papers on social media. Accounts claiming to sell this year’s exam papers are almost always scams." Ofqual chief regulator Sir Ian Bauckham

The reminder of consequences comes amid news that instances of cheating by taking a mobile phone into the exam room have almost doubled since 2018. There were 2,180 reported penalties for this in 2023, compared with 1,825 in 2022. General malpractice not specifically relating to mobile phone use, had 4,895 reported cases in 2023, a rise from 4,105 in 2022. 

Pepe Di’Iasio, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), discussed both teens taking mobiles into exams, and the issue of leaked papers. He said "We are sure that the vast majority of students taking exams will stick to the rules, but there are always some who do not do so, and unfortunately the misuse of digital technology is a real headache."

He adds "Schools and colleges rigorously police exam rooms to ensure that devices are not brought in by candidates, and they warn students not to try to find exam papers on social media. These are generally fake papers being circulated as a scam, but in the rare event of a genuine paper being leaked, any student accessing that paper risks disqualification."

For more on teens, if you're struggling to get through to your teen, a psychologist shares top tips for overcoming this, and these conversation starters will help. Reflective parenting could help your teen manage their big emotions, and we advise how to start practicing it.

 Has your teen searched for the leaked exam papers online? Amount of students caught 'cheating' has doubled, here's everything you need to know - including consequences

2024 exams: Ofqual issues warning over cheating

2024 exams: Ofqual issues warning over cheating

Ofqual has warned of the risk of disqualification for students who take mobile phones into this summer’s GCSE and A-level exams.

Instances of students being found with mobile phones in exam rooms have almost doubled since 2018, and there were 2,180 penalties for this in 2023 compared with 1,825 in 2022.

The exams regulator also issued a reminder today about other rules on malpractice, such as not searching for exam papers on social media.

Ofqual chief regulator Sir Ian Bauckham said: “Students have been working hard to prepare for their exams, and nobody wants them to miss out on their grades and qualifications.

“Thankfully, most students are aware of the risks of malpractice and comply with the rules. It’s important that the rules are followed so that grades reflect what a student knows, understands and can do.

“Students should also be aware of the risks of exam papers on social media. Accounts claiming to sell this year’s exam papers are almost always scams. Students should report these accounts to teachers.”

Rise in GCSE and A-level exam cheating

Ofqual data, released in December last year, showed there were 4,895 cases of malpractice involving students during GCSE, AS- and A-level examinations in 2023, up from 4,105 in 2022.

Sir Ian added: “Students risk losing the qualification they’ve been studying for if they search for or communicate with social media accounts claiming to sell leaked exam papers.

“Sanctions can still apply even if the papers turn out to be fake. Buying papers is never worth the risk. 

“Students should focus on their revision and do their best in their exams. I want to wish them all the best.”

  • GCSEs and A levels: How Ofqual plans to cope with AI
  • GCSEs 2024: Concern over Year 11 absence as exams loom
  • Malpractice: Mobile phone exam cheating up by 33 per cent

Ofqual has said previously that it will be requesting information from all awarding organisations about how they are managing malpractice risks from AI.

Eventually Ofqual plans to record when AI-related cheating occurs.

Tech misuse ‘a real headache’ for schools

Pepe Di’Iasio, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said: “We are sure that the vast majority of students taking exams will stick to the rules, but there are always some who do not do so, and unfortunately the misuse of digital technology is a real headache.

“Schools and colleges rigorously police exam rooms to ensure that devices are not brought in by candidates, and they warn students not to try to find exam papers on social media.

“These are generally fake papers being circulated as a scam, but in the rare event of a genuine paper being leaked, any student accessing that paper risks disqualification.

“It is really important that students take heed of these warnings.”

A spokesperson for the Joint Council for Qualifications (JCQ), which represents the UK’s major exam boards, said: “It is important students know to report fraudulent accounts claiming to sell exam papers on social media to their teachers.

“JCQ wishes all students well with their exams and assessments.”

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topics in this article

Ofqual: Scale of change for Advanced British Standard ‘unprecedented’

Eberly Center

Teaching excellence & educational innovation.

Students Cheat on Assignments and Exams

Identify possible reasons for the problem you have selected. To find the most effective strategies, select the reason that best describes your situation, keeping in mind there may be multiple relevant reasons.

Students cheat on assignments and exams..

Students might not understand or may have different models of what is considered appropriate help or collaboration or what comprises plagiarism.

Students might blame their cheating behavior on unfair tests and/or professors.

Some students might feel an obligation to help certain other students succeed on exams—for example, a fraternity brother, sorority sister, team- or club-mate, or a more senior student in some cultures.

Some students might cheat because they have poor study skills that prevent them from keeping up with the material.

Students are more likely to cheat or plagiarize if the assessment is very high-stakes or if they have low expectations of success due to perceived lack of ability or test anxiety.

Students might be in competition with other students for their grades.

Students might perceive a lack of consequences for cheating and plagiarizing.

Students might perceive the possibility to cheat without getting caught.

Many students are highly motivated by grades and might not see a relationship between learning and grades.

Students are more likely to cheat when they feel anonymous in class.

This site supplements our 1-on-1 teaching consultations. CONTACT US to talk with an Eberly colleague in person!

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students cheat on assignments and exams

Chemistry Education Research and Practice

Optimizing testing feedback in introductory chemistry: a multi-treatment study exploring varying levels of assessment feedback and subsequent performance.

Providing students with feedback on their performance is a critical part of enhancing student learning in chemistry and is often integrated into homework assignments, quizzes, and exams. However, not all feedback is created equal, and the type of feedback the student receives can dramatically alter the utility of the feedback to reinforce correct processes and assist in correcting incorrect processes. This work seeks to establish a ranking of how eleven different types of testing feedback affected student retention or growth in performance on multiple-choice general chemistry questions. These feedback methods ranged from simple noncorrective feedback to more complex and engaging elaborative feedback. A test-retest model was used with a one-week gap between the initial test and following test in general chemistry I. Data collection took place at multiple institutions over multiple years. Data analysis used four distinct grading schemes to estimate student performance. These grading schemes included dichotomous scoring, two polytomous scoring techniques, and the use of item response theory to estimate students’ true score. Data were modeled using hierarchical linear modeling which was set up to control for any differences in initial abilities and to determine the growth in performance associated with each treatment. Results indicated that when delayed elaborative feedback was paired with students being asked to recall/rework the problem, the largest student growth was observed. To dive deeper into student growth, both the differences in specific content-area improvement and the ability levels of students who improved the most were analyzed.

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students cheat on assignments and exams

K. Murphy, D. G. Schreurs, M. Teichert, C. J. Luxford, J. Trate, J. T. Harshman and J. L. Schneider, Chem. Educ. Res. Pract. , 2024, Accepted Manuscript , DOI: 10.1039/D4RP00077C

To request permission to reproduce material from this article, please go to the Copyright Clearance Center request page .

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'Time zone cheating' in IB exams after several question papers leaked on Reddit, Telegram

Time zone cheating occurs when students present in one time zone, after completing their exams, share what they remember about the questions on social media. This activity takes place before students in other time zones appear for the exam.

  • Updated May 08, 2024, 4:12 PM IST

IB exam papers leaked in 'time zone cheating' in a first in 55 years: Report

The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) students have reportedly misused the time zone differences to leak the question papers of mathematics and several other subjects through social media platforms, which offered other students who were still supposed to appear for those exams in other time zones, an unfair advantage over others.

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Question papers of several IP papers like business management, global politics, mathematics, physics, computer science, biology and chemistry were leaked on social media platforms of Telegram and Reddit, the South China Morning Post reported.

The incident being referred to as 'time zone cheating' has triggered an investigation by the IB authority, as for the first time in the board's 55-year history such a leak has happened. The source of the leak is currently not disclosed by the authorities; suspicions are that Turkey is the source of origin. 

As per the reports, the leaked materials were downloaded over 45,000 times until Sunday. 

“We have identified the source of this activity and are taking appropriate steps to hold those responsible accountable,” IB said in its statement. However, it didn't specify the source.

The issue has raised concerns and questions on the fairness and authenticity of the IB system.

The board disclosed that very few students were involves in what is being termed as 'time zone cheating.'

"To date, there is no evidence of widespread cheating and we are confident that this activity remains at the fringes of what is otherwise a standard exam session," it said in a release on Sunday.

But what is 'Time Zone Cheating'?

Time zone cheating is banned by IB as a part of their academic integrity policy. 

Online petitions have surfaced urging the IB to cancel this year's exams. Many have even asked the board to ensure justice for students unaffected by the leaks. The petition has received over 3,000 signatures. 

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COMMENTS

  1. Why Students Cheat—and What to Do About It

    But students also rationalize cheating on assignments they see as having value. High-achieving students who feel pressured to attain perfection (and Ivy League acceptances) may turn to cheating as a way to find an edge on the competition or to keep a single bad test score from sabotaging months of hard work. At Stuyvesant, for example, students ...

  2. Students cheat on assignments and exams.

    Students are more likely to cheat or plagiarize if the assessment is very high-stakes or if they have low expectations of success due to perceived lack of ability or test anxiety. Students might be in competition with other students for their grades. Students might perceive a lack of consequences for cheating and plagiarizing.

  3. Cheating: Preventing and Dealing with Academic Dishonesty

    I believe students are less likely to cheat if they feel they know and like the instructor. Learning and using students' names in class may have a beneficial side effect of reducing cheating. Teach Students What Plagiarism Is So They Can Avoid Doing It. The nature of cheating depends on the assignment. Written assignments run the risk of ...

  4. Common Reasons Students Cheat

    Students report that they resort to academic dishonesty when they feel that they won't be able to successfully perform the task (e.g., write the computer code, compose the paper, do well on the test). Fear of failure prompts students to get unauthorized help, but the repercussions of cheating far outweigh the repercussions of failing.

  5. Facts and Statistics

    Cheating in High School. McCabe also conducted surveys of over 70,000 high school students at over 24 high schools in the United States. This work demonstrated that 64 percent of students admitted to cheating on a test, 58 percent admitted to plagiarism and 95 percent said they participated in some form of cheating, whether it was on a test ...

  6. PDF Proof that a simple positive approach can reduce student cheating

    Unfortunately, the education literature indicates that student cheating on exams is much too common. According to the Josephson Institute (2012), nearly 52 percent of the over 23,000 ... require teachers to engage in activities that mitigate a negative action instead of teaching a positive behavior. As such, these processes also run counter to ...

  7. What students see as cheating and how allegations are handled

    Students are still held accountable, though, Rettinger adds. "It's important to think of the student that didn't cheat on an assignment. When a student cheats, their actions have implications for everyone in the class." Systems where students run the entire process, including appeals, are very rare, to his knowledge.

  8. Explore Strategies

    Explore potential strategies. My students cheat on assignments and exams. Students are more likely to cheat or plagiarize if the assessment is very high-stakes or if they have low expectations of success due to perceived lack of ability or test anxiety.

  9. Why Do Students Cheat?

    Sometimes they have a reason to cheat like feeling [like] they need to be the smartest kid in class.". Kayla (Massachusetts) agreed, noting, "Some people cheat because they want to seem cooler than their friends or try to impress their friends. Students cheat because they think if they cheat all the time they're going to get smarter.".

  10. Academic Dishonesty: 5 Methods of Identifying Cheating and Plagiarism

    5. Manage Exam Administration and Proctoring. Most attention is focused on deterring cheating is during exams. A few methods that can specifically help discourage academic dishonesty during these high-stake assessments include: Assigned Seats: A good first step is to assign seats for each exam.

  11. Students cheat for good grades. Why not make the classroom about

    We have been hearing stories about academic cheating: from students caught cheating on homework assignments as well as college entrance exams to teachers being caught in cheating scandals, such as ...

  12. How to Appropriately Respond to Students Who Cheat on Tests

    Cheating on written assignments is a bit easier for educators to deal with because it is far easier to prove. However, dealing with students who cheat on exams can be more challenging.

  13. How and Why Do College Students Cheat on Assignments?

    The extensive group of motivations behind cheating on written assignments relates to time management: 68% of students lack this skill and can't organize their schedule to complete tasks on the due date. For 85%, things are more complicated: Struggling with academic overload, they can't physically meet all the strict deadlines and decide to ...

  14. PDF Choosing Not to Cheat: A Framework to Assess Students ...

    "cheat proof" tests and assignments on students' ethical development. Keywords academic integrity, cheating, assessment, first-year seminars Cover Page Footnote *Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Kenneth H. Kolb, Department of Sociology, Furman University, Greenville SC 29613. Contact: [email protected]

  15. PDF Let your students cheat on mathematics online exams: students ...

    cooperate while doing assignments, and cheat on exams (Setiadi, 2015). The results of the research by Khodaie et al. (2011) stated that over 90% of students cheated, 70% were ... According to Diego (2017), the main reasons students cheat are difficult subjects, namely science, mathematics, and English, lack of supervision, and lack of independent

  16. Adjusting to an Online Cheating Environment

    Copying from another assignment or test, Collaborating with others on an assignment with the professor has required independent work, ... they would be offered a second chance to take the exam. If a student did not admit to cheating but was found to have been using Chegg during the exam, they were reported to the Dean's Office for Academic ...

  17. 8 Ways to Prevent Students From Cheating With AI

    Use timed assignments. Setting reasonable time limits for exams and assignments is an effective way to thwart cheating with AI tools. When students have limited time, it becomes more challenging to rely on AI models for all their answers. Timed assignments encourage them to focus on understanding and applying the material rather than seeking ...

  18. SAGE Musings: Minimizing and Dealing with Academic Dishonesty

    Of course, that doesn't mean that each of those students cheats on every test or homework assignment. And there are degrees of academic dishonesty, some more galling than others. But, statistically speaking, chances are that many of your students will cheat on assignments or exams this term and every term (e.g. McBurney, 1996; Stephens, 2004).

  19. AI Cheating: Tips to Avoid and Detect

    Can students cheat with ChatGPT? Yes, it's technically possible for students to use ChatGPT to cheat on assignments or exams. ChatGPT can generate detailed responses to prompts, which could include essay questions or other types of assignments. However, using AI tools like ChatGPT in this way is considered a form of academic dishonesty.

  20. How Students Cheat

    A quick internet search for methods of cheating will reveal a wide range of resources, how-to guides, and demonstrational videos that show students how to cheat on exams and class assignments. Being aware of some of the tools and techniques that exist is important for faculty when designing and evaluating class assignments. Article Spinning

  21. Explore Strategies

    My students cheat on assignments and exams. Some students might cheat because they have poor study skills that prevent them from keeping up with the material. While our students are academically very capable, many of them lack the meta-cognitive skills and study skills that are essential in college. These include time-management skills, knowing ...

  22. When is it acceptable to report classmates who cheat on an exam?

    It's a given that we can get help on these types of assignments. But exams are proctored online, and getting help on them is strictly forbidden. However, some students in the chat have posted to the WhatsApp chat during their proctored exams, posting photos of the exams, the questions, and receiving help from others during their exams.

  23. Has your teen searched for the leaked exam papers online? Amount ...

    In light of the exam paper leak, Ofqual announce the consequences for those found searching for them. This comes as the number of students found cheating doubles in six years.

  24. GCSE and A-level exams 2024: Ofqual warns about cheating

    Accounts claiming to sell this year's exam papers are almost always scams. Students should report these accounts to teachers." Rise in GCSE and A-level exam cheating. Ofqual data, released in December last year, showed there were 4,895 cases of malpractice involving students during GCSE, AS- and A-level examinations in 2023, up from 4,105 ...

  25. International Baccalaureate exams body to probe leaks after finding

    The IB said on Sunday that it discovered a small number of students had engaged in "time zone cheating" and there was "no evidence" the practice was widespread, although the Post found the ...

  26. Students cheat on assignments and exams.

    Some students might feel an obligation to help certain other students succeed on exams—for example, a fraternity brother, sorority sister, team- or club-mate, or a more senior student in some cultures. Some students might cheat because they have poor study skills that prevent them from keeping up with the material.

  27. Optimizing testing feedback in introductory chemistry: a multi

    Providing students with feedback on their performance is a critical part of enhancing student learning in chemistry and is often integrated into homework assignments, quizzes, and exams. However, not all feedback is created equal, and the type of feedback the student receives can dramatically alter the utility of the feedback to reinforce ...

  28. IB taking 'appropriate and timely measures' to remove leaked exam questions

    IB says investigation has found 'students engaged' in 'time-zone cheating' activities but did not disclose how many were involved; Those responsible will receive no marks for their exams ...

  29. 'Time zone cheating' in IB exams after several question papers leaked

    Time zone cheating occurs when students present in one time zone, after completing their exams, share what they remember about the questions on social media. This activity takes place before ...

  30. Update on May DP exams

    Time zone cheating occurs when students who have completed their examinations share what they can recall from memory about the exam questions on social media before other students take the examination. ... We are acutely aware that IB students around the world have worked tirelessly to be ready to sit their exams and have held themselves to the ...