• Tech Deals at Target Right Now!
  • The Ultimate Sleep Tech To Wind You Down

How to Open the Task Manager in Windows 10

Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc, right-click the Start button or the taskbar, or search for it

task manager keyboard

  • Wilfrid Laurier University

task manager keyboard

  • Wichita Technical Institute

In This Article

Jump to a Section

  • An Overview of the Methods
  • Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc
  • Other Keyboard Shortcuts
  • More Ways to Open Task Manager
  • Frequently Asked Questions

What to Know

  • Ctrl + Shift + Esc is the fastest way to open Task Manager in Windows 10. Ctrl + Alt + Delete also works.
  • Or, right-click the Start button , or anywhere on the taskbar , to access the Task Manager shortcut.
  • Task Manager's real location is in the System32 folder. You can open it there, too, or with the taskmgr command.

Task Manager is an excellent tool for keeping track of system processes, monitoring resource usage, and forcing memory-hogging applications to close. Microsoft has introduced several improvements to Task Manager over the years, but luckily, accessing it on Windows 10 hasn’t changed much from Windows 7.

How Do I Open Task Manager in Windows 10?

From the Start menu to keyboard shortcuts, there are multiple ways to open Task Manager in Windows 10. Here are the most common ways to do it:

  • Press Ctrl + Shift + Esc
  • Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete
  • Open Power User Menu by pressing Win+X
  • Right-click the taskbar
  • Use File Explorer
  • Create a shortcut

What Is the Fastest Way to Open Task Manager?

The easiest (and fastest) keyboard shortcut for opening Task Manager is Ctrl + Shift + Esc . This takes you directly to the utility in just a moment or two.

Other Ways to Get to Task Manager on a Keyboard

Here are a few other keyboard shortcuts to open up Task Manager quickly:

Ctrl+Alt+Delete

Ctrl+Alt+Delete is a popular shortcut across multiple generations of Windows, and up until Windows Vista, it brought you directly to Task Manager. The shortcut’s functionality has changed a bit with successive versions of Windows, as it now opens the Windows Security screen.

Once the Windows Security screen is open, select Task Manager from the menu to open it.

Modern versions of Windows include a feature called Power User Menu that can be accessed by pressing Win + X . This menu provides quick access to a number of advanced system utilities, including Task Manager.

How Do I Open Task Manager Without Keyboard Shortcuts?

If you're more of a mouse user, you're in luck! There are several other ways to access Task Manager in Windows 10.

Right-Click the Taskbar

This method is pretty self-explanatory. All you need to do is right-click anywhere on the taskbar at the bottom of your screen, and select Task Manager .

Use the Run Box or Start Menu

You can use Windows 10 search functionality to access Task Manager in a couple of ways. 

Pressing Win + R will bring up the Run box, which has been a Windows OS fixture for decades. Enter taskmgr into the field provided and then press OK to open Task Manager.

You can also use the Windows 10 Start menu’s search box. Type taskmgr and press Enter .

Locate Task Manager in File Explorer

If a manual search is more your style, you can look for the Task Manager executable directly in File Explorer.

Open File Explorer .

Select This PC .

Open C drive .

Open the Windows folder.

Go into System32 .

Type taskmgr in the search bar and press Enter .

Open Taskmgr .

Create a Shortcut

If you find yourself needing to use Task Manager a lot, it might be a good idea to create a shortcut. There are a couple of methods for doing this.

While Task Manager is running, create a shortcut in the Taskbar by right-clicking the Task Manager icon and selecting Pin to Taskbar .

You can also create a desktop shortcut using the following steps:

Right-click an empty space on your desktop and select New .

Select Shortcut .

Enter this path to Task Manager in the System32 folder , and then press Next :

Type Task Manager as the name for the new shortcut and then press Finish .

macOS doesn't have a Task Manager, but you can access Task Manager-equivalent functions in two places. First, the Force Quit Applications dialog is where you can force malfunctioning programs to quit. To access the Force Quit dialog, select the Apple menu , then click Force Quit . Or, press Command+Option+Esc to bring up the Force Quit dialog. If you need to access information about memory consumption or process data, you'll need to open the Activity Monitor. To access the Activity Monitor, click Spotlight Search (the magnifying glass on the top right of your screen), and type in Activity Monitor .

To open a Chromebook's task-management tool, click the Menu icon > More Tools and select Task Manager . For more data, select  Stats for Nerds .

An easy way to do this is to open Task Manager on your primary monitor, then use Windows+Shift+left arrow or right arrow to move the application window from one monitor to the other.

To run Task Manager as an administrator, navigate to Task Manager using one of the methods described above. Then, right-click on Task Manager and select Run as Administrator . Enter the administrator password when prompted, then you'll open Task Manager as an administrator.

To use the Google Chrome Task Manager , open Chrome and select Menu (three dots), then select More Tools > Task Manager . With Chrome's Task Manager, view a list of every open tab, process, and extension, as well as key statistics about memory usage, CPU usage, and network activity. 

Get the Latest Tech News Delivered Every Day

  • 7 Ways to Open the Task Manager in Windows 11
  • How to Check RAM on Windows 10
  • How to Force-Quit a Program in Windows 11
  • How to Properly Reboot (Restart) a Windows Computer
  • The Best Windows Keyboard Shortcuts in 2024
  • How to Check CPU Usage in Windows 11
  • The 6 Best Ways to Switch Users in Windows 10
  • How to Change Startup Programs in Windows 11
  • How to Open Disk Management From Command Prompt
  • How to Find Out What Graphics Card You Have on a Windows 11 Computer
  • How to Open an Elevated Command Prompt
  • How to Shut Down Windows 10
  • How to Check Computer Specs on Windows
  • How to Open Disk Management
  • How to Use Multiple Desktops in Windows 11
  • 8 Ways to Shut Down Windows 11
  • PRO Courses Guides New Tech Help Pro Expert Videos About wikiHow Pro Upgrade Sign In
  • EDIT Edit this Article
  • EXPLORE Tech Help Pro About Us Random Article Quizzes Request a New Article Community Dashboard This Or That Game Popular Categories Arts and Entertainment Artwork Books Movies Computers and Electronics Computers Phone Skills Technology Hacks Health Men's Health Mental Health Women's Health Relationships Dating Love Relationship Issues Hobbies and Crafts Crafts Drawing Games Education & Communication Communication Skills Personal Development Studying Personal Care and Style Fashion Hair Care Personal Hygiene Youth Personal Care School Stuff Dating All Categories Arts and Entertainment Finance and Business Home and Garden Relationship Quizzes Cars & Other Vehicles Food and Entertaining Personal Care and Style Sports and Fitness Computers and Electronics Health Pets and Animals Travel Education & Communication Hobbies and Crafts Philosophy and Religion Work World Family Life Holidays and Traditions Relationships Youth
  • Browse Articles
  • Learn Something New
  • Quizzes Hot
  • This Or That Game New
  • Train Your Brain
  • Explore More
  • Support wikiHow
  • About wikiHow
  • Log in / Sign up
  • Computers and Electronics
  • Operating Systems

How to Open Windows Task Manager: Menus, Shortcuts, & More

Fast and easy ways to see running apps and services in Windows

Last Updated: September 5, 2023 Fact Checked

Ctrl + Shift + Esc

Ctrl + alt + del, taskbar menu, power user menu, windows search, control panel, run dialog box, command prompt, file explorer, pin to the taskbar, make a desktop shortcut.

This article was co-authored by Luigi Oppido and by wikiHow staff writer, Kyle Smith . Luigi Oppido is the Owner and Operator of Pleasure Point Computers in Santa Cruz, California. Luigi has over 25 years of experience in general computer repair, data recovery, virus removal, and upgrades. He is also the host of the Computer Man Show! broadcasted on KSQD covering central California for over two years. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 492,941 times.

Trying to open the Windows Task Manager to end a process or check your computer's performance? The Task Manager allows you to view various activities that occur on your PC. You can monitor running applications, CPU and RAM usage, startup apps (Windows 8 and 10 only), and services. You can also end unresponsive or frozen applications! This wikiHow article will show you various ways to open the Task Manager in Windows 8, Windows 10, and Windows 11, including quick keyboard shortcuts.

Things You Should Know

  • Press Ctrl + Shift + Esc to immediately open the Task Manager.
  • Alternatively, right-click the Taskbar and select "Task Manager" to open it.
  • You can also press Windows Key + X to open the Power User menu and select "Task Manager."

Step 1 Press the Ctrl+⇧ Shift+Esc keys together.

  • You're ready to look through your processes and end tasks! Clearing tasks that you don't need to run is a great way to speed up a slow windows computer .

Step 1 Press the Ctrl+Alt+Del keys together.

  • You're done! You're ready to close unresponsive programs and change process priorities .

Step 1 Right-click on the Start icon button.

  • You can also press ⊞ Win + x together to do this.

Step 2 Choose Task Manager from the list of options.

  • Alternatively, press the T keyboard key.

Step 1 Launch the search feature.

  • Windows 8.1 : Press ⊞ Win + Q . [1] X Trustworthy Source Microsoft Support Technical support and product information from Microsoft. Go to source

Windows 7 Start

  • Windows XP : This method will not work.

Step 2 Type task manager.

  • You'll need to scroll down past the folders, which are always placed at the top.

Step 6 Right-click the Task Manager icon in the Taskbar.

  • In Windows 11, you may need to click Show more options to access the Create shortcut option.

Step 7 Double-click the Task Manager shortcut.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • For more helpful Windows features, check out how to take a screenshot and how to zoom out the screen . Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

task manager keyboard

You Might Also Like

Shut Down Your PC with a Shortcut Key

  • ↑ https://support.microsoft.com/en-ca/help/12445/windows-keyboard-shortcuts

About This Article

Luigi Oppido

  • Send fan mail to authors

Reader Success Stories

Anonymous

Mar 16, 2018

Is this article up to date?

task manager keyboard

May 5, 2017

Am I a Narcissist or an Empath Quiz

Featured Articles

How to Block Cookies in Chrome, Safari, & More

Trending Articles

8 Reasons Why Life Sucks & 15 Ways to Deal With It

Watch Articles

Fold Boxer Briefs

  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy Policy
  • Do Not Sell or Share My Info
  • Not Selling Info

wikiHow Tech Help Pro:

Level up your tech skills and stay ahead of the curve

How to open Task Manager on Windows

Here's how to open Task Manager on Windows 10 and Windows 11

A laptop running Windows 11, representing an article about how to use task scheduler on windows

PC newbie or veteran, you may not know how to open Task Manager on Windows. Why would you want to open the Windows Task Manager anyway? Well, this feature does a lot more than its name suggests.

Task Manager not only lets you manage tasks (who'd have guessed?) — but also shows a whole bunch of useful information, such as your computer’s current performance or which apps are taking up the most resources on startup.

Even if you have one of the best Windows laptops or best gaming PCs , this info can still come in handy.

There are a few ways to open Task Manager on Windows 11 and Windows 10, as we cover in our simple guide below.

Ready? Here's how to open Task Manager on Windows 10 and Windows 11.

1. Use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Alt + Esc

Logitech keyboard

It requires some finger gymnastics, but this is the easiest and quickest way to open Task Manager on Windows. 

Sign up to get the BEST of Tom’s Guide direct to your inbox.

Upgrade your life with a daily dose of the biggest tech news, lifestyle hacks and our curated analysis. Be the first to know about cutting-edge gadgets and the hottest deals.

2. You can also right-click the taskbar , then click Task Manager . 

Windows 10 desktop

This is a useful method if you don't have a working keyboard to hand. Unfortunately, this only works in Windows 10 as it was removed from Windows 11 for some reason. If anyone from Microsoft is reading this: bring back this feature, please! 

3. Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete , then click Task Manager .

Logitech keyboard

The third, and probably most familiar, way to open the task manager is through the Ctrl + Alt + Delete menu. This is the classic way to get to the task manager that most of us will recognize, though step 1 above is a much more efficient alternative. 

4. Press Win + R to open a command prompt, then type in "taskmgr" and hit enter .

Windows 10 command prompt

You can even open the Task Manager from a command prompt. This is the best choice if you want to impress your friends by appearing like a hacker or character from The Matrix.

And there we are. Now you can summon Task Manager in four different ways. With this knowledge, you’re invincible. Now you know how to open Task Manager on Windows, take a look at how to enable God Mode in Windows 11 or 10 or how to change the Windows 11 Start menu back to Windows 10 . Or for another Windows guide, check out how to factory reset on Windows 10 .

Dale Fox

Dale Fox is a freelance journalist based in the UK. He's been a tech nerd ever since childhood, when he used the money from his first job as a paperboy to buy a subscription to GamesMaster magazine. Dale was previously a presenter and editor in China, where he also worked as a copywriter for OnePlus at its Shenzhen HQ.  

Massive AT&T data leak hits 73 million users — what to do now

Tom's Guide asks: What's the perfect laptop screen size?

New on Netflix: 5 movies and shows to watch this week (April 1-7)

Most Popular

By Cynthia Lawrence March 26, 2024

By Camilla Sharman March 25, 2024

By Camilla Sharman March 24, 2024

By Cynthia Lawrence March 24, 2024

By Camilla Sharman March 23, 2024

By Cynthia Lawrence March 23, 2024

By Anthony Spadafora March 22, 2024

By Roderick Easdale March 21, 2024

By Cynthia Lawrence March 21, 2024

By Camilla Sharman March 20, 2024

By Peter Wolinski March 20, 2024

  • 2 Don't wait! Get Apple AirTags for just $18 a piece in this 4-pack deal at Amazon
  • 3 Final Fantasy VII Rebirth
  • 4 Google looked to the original Pixel to decide on 7 years of software updates for the Pixel 8
  • 5 PS5 Pro could have ‘Enhanced’ label for games that use its full power

Guiding Tech

We explain and teach technology, solve tech problems and help you make gadget buying decisions.

9 Ways to Open Task Manager on Windows 10 and Windows 11

Task Manager is one of the most commonly used programs on Windows, regardless of its version. It is a tool that displays currently running programs and resource utilization such as CPU, RAM, graphics card, hard disk, and processes on a Windows OS. Task Manager can be used to end unresponsive programs and processes, start new tasks, monitor your system’s performance, and view detailed information.

Open Task Manager on Windows

However, before you can use the Task Manager to get the work done, you must know how to open it. Whether a beginner or a technology geek, we have compiled this detailed guide to help you understand the different ways and shortcuts to open Task Manager in Windows. Let’s start with the easiest way.

1. Open Task Manager with Windows Search

It is the easiest way to open the Windows Task Manager without complexities. Below are the steps on how to go about it.

Step 1 : Go to the Windows Start menu or hit ‘Windows + S.’

Step 2 : Now, type Task Manager and press Enter.

Click on Windows Search to Open Task Manager

That’s it! It is the easiest way to open the task manager on Windows.

Windows Task Manager

However, if you find that you’re Task Manager doesn’t load or work, check out our guide on the top ways to fix the Task Manager not working issue .

2. Use Keyboard Shortcuts to Open Task Manager on Windows

Some apps might go off the block, leading your Windows software to stop responding. In this scenario, you can’t access Windows Search to see the running app and stop it. To overcome this, we have Windows hotkeys. There are three different key combinations with which you can open Task Manager. Let’s see them.

Open Task Manager Using Win + X Shortcut

Simply press Win + X or right-click on the Start (Windows) button in the taskbar. Now, from the menu, click on Task Manager to open it.

Windows Quick Action menu to open Task Manager

There you go. Simple, right? Moving on. If you are unable to access Windows hotkeys, then our guide on fixing keyboard shortcuts not working on Windows will help you out.

Open Task Manager Using Win + X and T Shortcut

This method is an extension of the above one. Using this approach, you can directly open the Windows Task Manager without the involvement of a mouse.

Firstly, Press Win + X to open the Windows Quick Access Menu. Now, Press T. This will open the Windows Task Manager.

This method is easier and more efficient than the one listed above.

Open Task Manager Using Ctrl+Alt+Del Windows Hotkey

Yet another way to open the Task Manager is by using Windows Hotkeys.

Press Ctrl + Shift + Del together. It will instantly open the Windows Task Manager. However, some apps might prevent users from accessing Task Manager with the above method.

In that case, Press Ctrl + Shift + Del together and select Task Manager in the Graphical Identification and Authentication (GINA) screen. The added advantage is that this hotkey helps open Task Manager while using a remote desktop or working on a virtual machine.

Press ctrl-alt-del to open Task Manager

3. Open Task Manager using Run Command on Windows

It is no surprise that, through the Run command, one can access essential components of Windows. Here’s how to access Task Manager.

Step 1 : Go to Windows Search and type Run. Alternatively, you can directly press the ‘Win + R’ hotkey.

Press Win+R to open run command

Step 2 : Now, type taskmgr or taskmgr.exe and hit Enter.

Type Taskmgr on Run command to open Task Manager

That’s it! You will directly land on the Task Manager.

4. Bring Up Task Manager on Windows From File Explorer

Yes, you can access Task Manager from File Explorer with a quick two-step process. Here’s how to do it.

Step 1 : Launch File Explorer on your PC or Press ‘Win + E.’

Open Task Manager From File Explorer

Step 2 : At the address bar, type taskmgr.exe and press Enter.

Type Taskmgr.exe on the file explorer's address bar

Here you go; you have got into Task Manger from File Explorer; not very conventional, but it works. However, if your file explorer is not working, our guide on how to fix File Explorer search not working on Windows will surely help.

5. Access Task Manager on Windows via Control Panel

The Control Panel hosts many options, and it also has an option to open Windows Task Manager. Follow the below steps to bring it up.

Step 1 : Go to the Control Panel pinned on the taskbar.

If you don’t have it pinned, use Windows Search to open Control Panel.

Open Control Panel using Windows Search

Step 2 : In the Control Panel’s address bar, type taskmgr.exe and press Enter.

Type taskmgr.exe on the address bar

6. Use the Settings App to Bring up Task Manager

Step 1 : Press the ‘Win + I’ hotkey to open Windows Settings.

Open Settings app for opening Windows Task Manager

Step 2 : Type Task Manager in the settings bar and click on the ‘View system resource usage in the Task Manager’ option to open the Task Manager.

Type task manager on the settings search

All the steps above were pretty straightforward. Now, let’s move on to complicated-looking but simple-to-execute ways.

7. Open Windows Task Manager Using Command Prompt or PowerShell

Windows is incomplete without the Command Prompt, Terminal, or PowerShell. Here’s how to open Task Manager using it.

Step 1 : Open PowerShell or Command Prompt.

If you don’t already know, we have described various methods extensively in our guide on how to open Command Prompt on Windows .

Search Command prompt on Windows Search

Step 2 : Now, type taskmgr.exe and press Enter.

Type taskmgr.exe on the command prompt to open Task Manager

There you go. You are in the Windows Task Manager.

8. Open Task Manager on Windows 11 Using Windows Tool

We will use the Windows Tools option to access Task Manager for this method. Windows Tools contains tools for system administrators and advanced users. Follow the below steps.

Step 1 : Press the Windows key and go to All apps.

Go to All apps from Windows search

Step 2 : Now, scroll down to find Windows Tool and open it.

Open Windows Tools using Windows Search

Step 3 : Scroll down and double-click on the Task Manager.

Click on Task Manager to open it

A not-so-conventional way to open Task Manager, but sometimes, this way of opening Task Manager can be easy considering your position on Windows.

9. Bring up Task Manager Using Shortcut Function

If you use Task Manager often, it is better to create a shortcut and place it on the desktop for easy usage. Here’s how to do it.

Step 1 : Right-click anywhere on the desktop, go to New, and choose Shortcut.

Right click to open Shortcut menu

Step 2 : Now, type taskmgr.exe in the location field and click on Next.

Type taskmgr.exe on the file location of the item

Step 3 : Enter Task Manager as the shortcut’s name and press Enter.

Type the file name and press finish

A Task Manager Shortcut will be created on the desktop. So, next time, you don’t have to do the tedious work of following multiple steps or remembering hotkeys. Simply double-click on the Shortcut and open the Task Manager.

Open Task Manager With Ease

There are multiple ways to open Task Manager on Windows, but the above-mentioned steps are a few of the efficient ways to do it. We hope this guide helped you in opening Windows Task Manager effectively and efficiently. Which method do you use to open Task Manager? Share your answer in the comment section below.

Last updated on 03 September, 2022

The above article may contain affiliate links which help support Guiding Tech. However, it does not affect our editorial integrity. The content remains unbiased and authentic.

task manager keyboard

DID YOU KNOW

task manager keyboard

Atish Rajasekharan

Atish is a seasoned tech enthusiast fueled by caffeine and a Computer Science engineering degree. He stumbled into the blogging world in 2015 and hasn't looked back. Over 2000+ articles later, his work has been featured on sites like Gizbot, Firstpost, PhoneArena, GSMArena, and IBTimes. At GT, he's your go-to guy for how-tos, invaluable tips, and troubleshooting guides that actually work. He's also an SEO and digital marketing whiz and content strategist, so his tech takes are always on point and ethical.

More in Windows

task manager keyboard

4 Best Parental Control Settings to Use on Windows 11

task manager keyboard

Top 6 Ways to Fix No Battery Is Detected on Windows 11 Laptop

Join the newsletter.

Get Guiding Tech articles delivered to your inbox.

Sign up for our daily newsletter

  • Privacy Policy
  • Advertise with Us

10 Ways to Open the Task Manager in Windows

Sayak Boral

No matter the Windows version you’re using, Task Manager is a frequently used tool, as it’s very important for system maintenance. Using the Task Manager, you can quickly end unresponsive programs, start new tasks, monitor the performance and activities of your system, get details of running processes, and have a quick glance at system resources, such as CPU, RAM and hard disk.

Because it’s such a vital tool, Windows provides multiple ways to open the Task Manager. This is particularly useful for accessibility reasons, and knowing these separate methods can be a great help in different situations. The following is an updated list of ways to help you open Task Manager in Windows 10 systems. Many, but not all, of these techniques will apply to older Windows versions.

Also read: What Is TrustedInstaller and Should You Delete It?

1. From the Taskbar

Opening the Windows Task Manager from the taskbar is probably the most used method, as it only requires a couple of mouse clicks and no need to type anything. First, right-click on the taskbar, then select “Task Manager” from the list of options. This action will instantly open the Windows Task Manager.

Ways To Open Task Manager Taskbar

Once open, you can easily view Task Manager activities across various tabs.

Ways To Open Task Manager Manager Window

2. Using Keyboard Shortcut

An easier way to open the Task Manager in Windows is to use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Shift + Esc . There are plenty of keyboard shortcuts in Windows , but since the Task Manager is an application that you frequently access, it is worthwhile to remember this shortcut for quick access.

3. Using Command Prompt

You can also open the Windows Task Manager using the command prompt. This is particularly useful if your system is behaving very slowly, and the command prompt happens to be the least resource-intensive. For this, search “cmd” in the Windows 10 search box. Sometimes you may need to open the Task Manager as an administrator. If you are using a standard user account , the utility of the normal Task Manager is limited.

Ways To Open Task Manager Cmd Start Menu

Once the command prompt is open, type the following command and press the Enter key to open the Task Manager:

Ways To Open Task Manager Command Prompt

4. Using Run Command

Just as with the command prompt, you can also open the Task Manager using the Run command. To start, press Win + R , type taskmgr , and hit the Enter key to open the Windows Task Manager.

ways-to-open-task-manager-run-cmd

5. From File Explorer

Sometimes you need the exact location of the Task Manager, especially if there are any potential uses, such as adding it as a shortcut menu on Desktop. In Windows, Task Manager is shipped as a separate application that integrates with the operating system. If you know where to find it, you can open the Task Manager from the Windows file explorer. To start, open the file explorer using the keyboard shortcut Win + E .

Ways To Open Task Manager File Explorer

Once the file explorer is open, navigate to the following location:

Run a search using “Taskmgr” to find the “Taskmgr.exe” application. Double-click to open the Task Manager.

Ways To Open Task Manager File Explorer Taskmgr.exe

If you want to open the Task Manager as an administrator, use a right-click on the application and select the option “Run as administrator.”

Ways To Open Task Manager File Explorer Admin Mode

6. From Ctrl + Alt + Del Screen

You can also open the Task Manager from the Windows security screen. This is done using the old-fashioned Ctrl + Alt + Del technique which allows you to select the Task Manager from multiple available options. You can do this by hitting the three keys together on your keyboard.

Once the security screen has been opened, select the “Task Manager” option. This action will open the Task Manager. This method is highly helpful if your system hangs, freezes or becomes unresponsive for any reason.

Ways To Open Task Manager Ctrl Alt Del

7. From Windows 10 Search Box

On the Windows 10 search box (also Windows 7 Start menu), type “task manager,” and you’ll be able to open it from here. You can additionally choose to open it as an administrator.

Ways To Open Task Manager Search Box Windows10

8. From Windows PowerShell

The Windows PowerShell is another utility that helps open various applications similar to the command prompt. Although most of us are unlikely to use this method, it’s helpful to know. Press the power keys Win + X and open Windows PowerShell, preferably as an admin. You can alternatively open PowerShell from the Windows 10 search box.

Ways To Open Task Manager Windows Powershell Win X

Once inside, enter the same command you did in command prompt: taskmgr . This will open the Task Manager within the PowerShell window.

Ways To Open Task Manager Windows Powershell

9. From Control Panel

The Control Panel also allows you to open Task Manager, but it’s not a frequently used method. Go to the Control Panel search window and enter “task manager,” which will open the tool from system resources.

Ways To Open Task Manager Control Panel

10. From Windows 10 Registry

In the rarest case, if you want to tweak the Task Manager attributes slightly (we don’t recommend it unless you know what you’re doing), you can access it from the Windows 10 registry. Go to the Windows 10 search box/run command window and type regedit . Then go down the following path:

Ways To Open Task Manager Regedit

Once inside, you can tweak the Task Manager attributes from “Preferences” and “UseStatusSetting.”

Do comment below sharing your thoughts and experiences about using the above stated different methods to open Task Manager in Windows. Which is your favorite method? Also, do check out our ultimate guide to the Task Manager .

Our latest tutorials delivered straight to your inbox

Sayak Boral

Sayak Boral is a technology writer with over eleven years of experience working in different industries including semiconductors, IoT, enterprise IT, telecommunications OSS/BSS, and network security. He has been writing for MakeTechEasier on a wide range of technical topics including Windows, Android, Internet, Hardware Guides, Browsers, Software Tools, and Product Reviews.

SanDisk SSD lying on a surface

OnMSFT.com

6 effective ways to open Task Manager in Windows 10 or Windows 11 

Shaant Minhas

October 19, 2021

task manager keyboard

Looking for more How To posts? Check out our How To Page for all the latest tips on Windows, Microsoft Teams, LinkedIn, and more!

In this article

If you’ve been a Windows user for a while, I’m sure you would’ve come across the Windows Task Manager at least once by now. Some users often find it difficult to open Task Manager in Windows 11, which is a major setback considering how important it is.

The last line of defense for every Windows user, the Task Manager is usually called upon when all your programs stop responding and your PC is stuck still and simply won’t budge from inactivity.

While the Task Manager can be used for much more than clearing non-responsive tasks and errors, here we’ll focus on how to open Task Manager so as not to digress from our topic.

Moreover, there’s not just one, but multiple ways that you can open the Windows Task Manager in your Windows. Let’s start with the simplest one.

1. Open the Task Manager with a keyboard shortcut

One of my personal favorites and probably the simplest one on this list, you can launch the Task Manager simply by pressing Ctrl + All + Delete together. When you press the shortcut keys, you’ll see the Windows Security screen pop open on your screen.

From there, click on Task Manager , and the Task Manager window will open up. From here, you’re free to use Task Manager however you’d like.

opening the task manager in windows 10

2. Use the Power user menu

You can also open the Task Manager from the Power User menu on your Windows computer. Put briefly, the Power User menu is a central place to access some of the most widely used Windows features.

To get started, press the Windows key + X option to open the Windows power menu. From there, select the Task Manager option, and you’ll have the Task Manager window in front of you.

opening the task manager from power user menu

3. Launch Task Manager from the taskbar

Navigate and  right-click on the taskbar of your Windows 10 PC, or on the Windows icon in the taskbar on a Windows 11 PC and select the Task Manager from the diverse set of options available on your screen.

launching windows task manager from task bar

4. Use the Ctrl + Shift + Esc shortcut

Another shortcut on our list, the Ctrl + Shift + Esc shortcut, is slightly different from the Ctrl + Alt + Delete shortcut we’ve used above.

Pressing Ctrl + Shift + Esc will open Task Manager in just a few seconds on your screens, as opposed to Ctrl + Alt + Delete, where you’ll have to first go through the Windows Security menu. Use this one if you’re rushing and want to quickly launch the Task Manager.

5. Use the “taskmgr” from the Start menu search bar

To open Task Manager in Windows 10/11 from the taskmgr EXE file, do the following:

  • Go to Start menu search bar, type “taskmgr.exe,” and select the Best match.

The Task Manager will be launched on your screen. Alternatively, you can also enter “taskmgr.exe” in the Run dialog box and hit Enter to launch the application.

opening task manager from run dialog box

Related: Task Manager Not Responding? Here are 4 Ways to Fix It

6. Use the Control Panel

This is a rather long-winded way, but you can also make use of the Control Panel to open Task Manager.

To get started, go to the Start menu search bar, type in “control panel,” and select the best match.

In the Control Panel, go to the search option in the top-right corner, type in ‘task manager’ in the search bar, and select the Task Manager option when it comes up.

opening the task manager from control panel

If you’re also looking to refresh the look of your Task Manager in Windows 11, we have a separate post highlighting what the Task Manager is and what it’s used for.

We also invite you to check out our expert guide on how to enable dark mode in the new Task Manager . Be sure to also check out our guide on how to fix the Task Manager in case you run into trouble and it’s not functioning properly.

Open Task Manager in Windows 10/11

The Task Manager is another one of the free utilities from Windows that makes our day-to-day Windows workflow hassle-free.

Apart from helping you fix random hang-ups of Windows that pop up from time to time, it can also help you see and fix the processes that are running behind your PC, while at the same time, showing the app history, user, and service details of your Windows.

Microsoft Authenticator adds autofill support for addresses and payment details

Dragon ball fighterz, age of empires iv, and more are coming to xbox game pass this month.

OnMSFT.com is built on:

Wordpress GeneratePress Azure

Theme thanks to heather.

task manager keyboard

Home About Contact Us

Join our team, © copyright 2014 - 2024 onmsft.com llc.

Guru99

Shortcut Keys to Open Task Manager on Windows 10/11

Matthew Martin

Task Manager is a handy little tool that lets you see the programs opened in the background, what processes each program has, allows you to customize which apps you want to open on startup, and more.

There are 7 tabs, each offering a different set of tools: processes, performance, app history, startup, users, details, and services. Using the Task Manager conveniently helps perform multiple functions. These functions include viewing running background apps, force closing rogue apps, disabling a process after exiting an app, or viewing the current state of your system’s resources.

The following Task Manager shortcut methods can provide that easy access:

Method 1: How to Open Task Manager using a Keyboard Shortcut

The fastest path to access Task Manager is to use the built-in keyboard shortcut that is standard on the Windows operating system. This keyboard is the easiest Task Manager shortcut when functioning correctly.

Step 1) Press down Ctrl+Shift+Esc at the same time.

Step 2) Your Task Manager will appear.

Open Task Manager using a Keyboard Shortcut

Another built-in Task Manager shortcut is to press ctrl alt delete.

Method 2: Open Task Manager from the Start Menu on Windows 11 / 10

The Start Menu is a straightforward approach to launching Task Manager. Your Start menu is a list of all your currently loaded programs.

Here are the steps to launch Task Manager from the Start menu:

Step 1) Click on the Start menu icon that is usually located in the lower left-hand corner of your computer screen.

Step 2) Scroll down to the Task Manager icon.

Step 3) Click on the Task Manager icon to open the program.

Method 3: How to Open Task Manager from Windows Search

Windows Search allows you to find any element of your computer system. That includes your Task Manager. When you use Windows search, you’ll notice that it provides an alphabetical prompt.

Here are the steps to use Windows Search to access your Task Manager:

Step 1) Click on the Search icon. That is a small magnifying glass at the bottom of your computer screen.

Open Task Manager from Windows Search

Step 2) Type in “Task Manager” in the empty space.

Open Task Manager from Windows Search

Step 3) Click on Task Manager when it appears in the search log.

Open Task Manager from Windows Search

Method 4: Use the Windows Power Menu shortcut to Open Task Manager

Once your Windows Power Menu icon opens, there will be multiple pathways across your computer system. The Power user menu can also grant you fast access to your Task Manager.

Here are steps for using the Windows Power Menu:

Step 1) Right-click the Start menu icon on your computer screen. You can also tap the Windows icon key on your keyboard to access the context menu.

Step 2) Scroll down to the Task Manager option.

Use the Windows Power Menu Shortcut to Open Task Manager

Step 3) Click on the Task Manager.

Use the Windows Power Menu Shortcut to Open Task Manager

The power user menu opens an excellent shortcut if your keyboard stops functioning and you only have access to the mouse.

Method 5: Use the Command Prompt to Open Task Manager on Windows PC

You can develop PC problems that prevent you from using your computer system. Going into the Task Manager can help shut down some of those issues. The Command Prompt is another viable path to access your Task Manager.

Note: The Command Prompt is also referred to as the Windows Powershell.

Here’s how to gain access to that portal:

Step 1) Right-click the Windows Start menu icon.

Use the Command Prompt to Open Task Manager

Step 2) Scroll down to Command Prompt or Windows PowerShell.

Use the Command Prompt to Open Task Manager

Step 3) Type in taskmgr.

Use the Command Prompt to Open Task Manager

Step 4) Hit enter, and the Task Manager window will appear.

Use the Command Prompt to Open Task Manager

Method 6: Open Task Manager from the Control Panel

Your Windows Control Panel can also grant you access to the Task Manager. This approach has several steps that seem cumbersome. However, it is a viable access path when other paths are blocked.

Step 1) Go to Windows Search.

Open Task Manager from the Control Panel

Step 2) Type of Control Panel and hit enter.

Step 3) Scroll down to System and click it on.

Open Task Manager from the Control Panel

Step 4) In the search box, type Task Manager.

Open Task Manager from the Control Panel

Step 5) Hit enter, and the Task Manager will pop up.

Open Task Manager from the Control Panel

Method 7: How to Open Task Manager using the Run Box

Sometimes it is practical to tell your computer to run a command directly. That can happen when you type that command into the rub box.

This is how to use that method:

Step 1) Press the Windows+R keys on the keyboard to open the run prompt.

How to Open Task Manager using the Run Box

Step 2) Type taskmgr into the prompt box.

How to Open Task Manager using the Run Box

Step 3) Click OK to open the Task Manager.

Close system tray programs

Method 8: How to Create a Desktop Shortcut for Open Task Manager

You probably have several desktop shortcuts for access to files and programs. You can add your Task Manager to that group.

Step 1) Locate the taskmgr.exe file (see below).

Step 2) Right-click the file.

Step 3) Select the Send To option and then select Desktop.

Step 4) The Task Manager desktop icon will appear.

Method 9: Run the Taskmgr.exe Executable File

Every application that is running on your computer has an executable file. The executable file for Task Manager is taskmgr.exe. That file can be found in the

C:\Windows\System32 folder on the Windows C: drive.

Here are the steps to Run the Taskmgr.exe Executable File:

Step 1) Open the File Explorer option on your computer.

Step 2) Search for the following location: C:\Windows\System32

Step 3) Scroll until you find taskmgr.exe. That is the Windows Task Manager executable file.

Step 4) Click the file, and the Task Manager window will appear.

Method 10: Pin Task Manager on the Taskbar

You will understand how essential quick access is when you use your Task Manager for the first time. One of the fastest pathways to your Task Manager is to create its taskbar shortcut.

Here are steps to Pin Task Manager on the Taskbar:

Step 1) Follow the instructions to the Task Manager executable file explained in the above section.

Step 2) When you find the Task Manager executable file again, right-click the file.

Step 3) Choose the Pin to Taskbar option.

Step 4) The Task Manager icon will now be on your taskbar.

As with any other application on your taskbar, you can unpin the Task Manager shortcut at any time with a right-click to the Unpin from the taskbar option.

  • Your computer Task Manager application is a vital tool to help access all the currently running programs on your computer.
  • Fast access to your Task Manager will let you shut down a program to improve your computer’s functions.
  • There are several methods you can utilize to access your Task Manager.
  • The quickest method is the built-in prompt Ctrl+Shift+Esc.
  • Additional methods involve searching for the Task Manager through command prompts or executable files.
  • You can also set up access to your Task Manager with a taskbar icon shortcut.
  • Opening Task Manager in windows with these steps will become easier.
  • How to Open BIN File on Windows & Mac (.Bin Opener)
  • How to Speed Up your Laptop: 8 Simple Steps
  • How to Open .DAT File in Windows, Mac, Android, iPhone
  • How to Reset Graphics Driver: 7 Easy Methods
  • How To Fix the “Kernel Security Check Failure” Error in Windows 10
  • How to Fix Msftconnecttest Redirect Error: 5 Methods
  • How to Stress Test CPU & RAM on Your PC
  • How to Use Headset Mic on Windows 10/11 PC

Keyboard Shortcut to Open Task Manager in Windows 10

The shortcut key to open a task manager is Ctrl+Shift+Esc .

Keyboard Shortcut to Open Task Manager in Windows 10

Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc on your keyboard and Windows will open the task manager instantly.

There is more than one way to open the task manager in Windows 10

We can access Task Manager by right-clicking the taskbar and choosing Task Manager.

There is more than one way to open the task manager in Windows 10

Another way is to right-click the Start button, and then choose Task Manager from the Quick Link menu.

Start button task manager shortcut

If you press the Ctrl+Alt+Delete key combination, you will get a blue screen as shown in the following screenshot.

windows task manager shortcut

On the blue screen, you will have a link to open the task manager.

The Task Manager is a monitoring tool that provides an instant view of system resources, such as, process activity, CPU usage, memory usage, network usage, service information, and more.

How to Open Task Manager in Windows 10

Kolade Chris

Windows Task Manager is an advanced utility tool that helps you manage your apps that are running.

Task Manager lets you see which apps are open and which you're using. You can also see which apps are running in the background that you didn't open yourself.

One important reason that you might want to open Task Manager is to stop apps that are making windows unresponsive.

There are a few different ways to open Task Manager. So in this article, I will walk you through 7 ways you can open Task Manager on Windows 10.

1. How to Open Task Manager with Windows Search

The easiest way to find anything on a Windows machine is to search for it. Task Manager is not an exception.

  • Click on the search icon then type "Task Manager" in the search bar.
  • Task Manager will pop up as a search result, and you can open it from there.

search

2. How to Open Task Manager with Keyboard Shortcuts

Some apps might go rogue and stop Windows from responding, so you might not have access to Windows Search in such situations.

Windows has two different key combinations with which you can open up Task Manager in case you want to see running apps or stop an app.

  • You can open Task Manager by pressing Ctrl + Shift + Esc all together. This opens Task Manager straightaway
  • You can also open Task Manager from the GINA screen by pressing and holding Ctrl + Alt + Del .

Some apps might prevent you from accessing Task Manager with Ctrl + Shift + Esc, but pressing Ctrl + Alt + Del will always open up the Graphical Identification and Authentication (GINA) screen for you so you can select and open Task Manager from there.

gina-screen

3. How to Open Task Manager through the Control Panel

You can use the Control Panel search option to open Task Manager.

Type "Task Manager" in the search bar and you will see a link to Task Manager under "System".

ControlPanel

4. How to Open Task Manger through the Start Menu

A lot of people prefer opening apps from the start menu. You can open Task Manager from there too.

  • Click on the Windows icon, or press the WIN Key on the keyboard.
  • Scroll to the bottom and open up the Windows system folder
  • Task Manager will be shown alongside some other apps – just select it there to open it.

startMenu

5. How to Open Task Manager with the Run Command

Many apps and folders can be opened with the run dialogue on Windows 10. There's a command for opening Task Manager from there too.

  • Press the WIN + R keys on the keyboard to open the run dialogue
  • Type "taskmgr" and click "Ok" to open the Task Manager.

runCommand

6. How to Open Task Manager from the Taskbar

You can open the Task Manager from Taskbar too.

Right-click on an empty space in the taskbar then select "Task Manager".

taskbar

7. How to Open Task Manager from the Windows Power User Menu

In addition to the 6 methods we've already seen, you can open Task Manager by right-clicking in the Windows logo and then selecting "Task Manager" from the menu that pops up.

You can also get there by pressing and holding the Win + X keys on the keyboard and then selecting “Task Manager” from the menu.

powerUser

Windows Task Manager is a very powerful tool that can greatly increase your productivity. With it, you can see which apps are running and stop those that are causing issues.

In this article, you've learned about several ways to open Task Manager on Windows 10 so you can have a better experience using it.

Thank you for reading, and have a nice time.

Web developer and technical writer focusing on frontend technologies. I also dabble in a lot of other technologies.

If you read this far, thank the author to show them you care. Say Thanks

Learn to code for free. freeCodeCamp's open source curriculum has helped more than 40,000 people get jobs as developers. Get started

  • Entertainment

How to Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 (8 Methods)

' src=

Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 (2022)

Open the task manager in windows 11 with keyboard shortcuts.

 Keyboard Shortcut

2. You can also press the “ Ctrl + Alt + Delete ” hotkey to open the Advanced menu. Here, click on “Task Manager” to check the CPU, GPU, and RAM usage of apps and processes on your Windows 11 PC.

advanced menu screen

Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 from the Quick Links Menu

Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 From the Quick Link Menu

2. And there you have it! Task Manager running on your Windows 11 PC.

Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 From the Quick Link Menu

Launch the Task Manager in Windows 11 from the Run Prompt

Launch the Task Manager in Windows 11 From the Run Prompt

Launch the Task Manager in Windows 11 from the Start Menu

Launch the Task Manager in Windows 11 From the Run Prompt

Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 from File Explorer

1. If you are in a File Explorer window and want to quickly access the Task Manager, click on the address bar, enter taskmgr.exe , and hit the Enter key.

taskmgr.exe

Find the Task Manager in Windows 11 from Windows Tools

Find the Task Manager in Windows 11 From Windows Tools

4. And that is how you can launch the Task Manager in Windows 11 from Windows Tools.

windows tools

Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 from Command Prompt and PowerShell

Command Prompt (CMD) and PowerShell

Create a Task Manager Shortcut on Windows 11 Desktop

Create a Task Manager Shortcut on Windows 11 Desktop

2. Next, type taskmgr.exe in the location field and click on “Next”.

Create a Task Manager Shortcut on Windows 11 Desktop

Monitor Your Windows 11 PC’s Performance with Task Manager

' src=

Passionate about Windows, ChromeOS, Android, security and privacy issues. Have a penchant to solve everyday computing problems.

Add new comment

How to Enable Group Policy Editor on Windows 11 Home

  • PC & Mobile

How to Launch Task Manager with a Keyboard Shortcut

task manager keyboard

Jim Tanous Read more June 1, 2016

The Task Manager is one of the most important system utilities in Windows, providing users with important information about running applications and processes, active user accounts, startup programs and services, and system resource status, such as CPU utilization and the amount of available RAM. Most Windows users know that they can launch Task Manager by pressing  Control-Alt-Delete on their keyboard and selecting Task Manager from the list of options, or by right-clicking on the desktop taskbar and choosing “Task Manager” from the context menu. If you frequently use Task Manager, however, you can access it even faster via two additional methods: a Task Manager keyboard shortcut or a Task Manager icon shortcut in the taskbar or Start Menu. Here’s how to configure both options.

How to Launch Task Manager with a Keyboard Shortcut

Task Manager Keyboard Shortcut

In older versions of Windows, users could access the Task Manager directly with the handy Control-Alt-Delete shortcut. Starting with Windows Vista, however, pressing  Control-Alt-Delete while logged into Windows launches an security screen with options to lock the PC, switch users, or log out. There’s also an option to launch Task Manager, but this screen introduces an intermediate step between pressing the keyboard shortcut and seeing the desired result.

cat keyboard

Mr. Bigglesworth prefers keyboard shortcuts (Shutterstock)

Create a Task Manager Shortcut in the Taskbar or Start Menu

task manager location

Related Posts

task manager keyboard

Disclaimer: Some pages on this site may include an affiliate link. This does not effect our editorial in any way.

How to Find the MAC Address of Your Amazon Fire Tablet

Lee Stanton March 16, 2024

Send a Video on iPhone

Paras Rastogi March 15, 2024

KineMaster Engine Failed to Initialize

Pankil Shah March 15, 2024

Send To Someone

Missing device.

Please enable JavaScript to submit this form.

task manager keyboard

4 Ways to Access the Task Manager on Windows 11

The Task Manager made the jump from Windows 10, and with it comes all the familiar ways to call it to action.

The Windows Task Manager is a powerful system utility tool that allows you to take control of the processes running on your PC, and it also provides valuable information about available CPU and RAM resources. And it has made the jump onto Windows 11, where it's just as easy to access as ever before.

Read on as we list the different ways you can launch the Windows Task Manager on the newly released Windows 11.

1. Launch Task Manager Through Start Menu

Launching the Task Manager through the redesigned Windows 11 Start menu is a fairly straightforward process:

  • Locate the Start menu icon on the taskbar (look for the Windows logo icon).
  • Right-click on the Start icon and a context menu will pop up.
  • Finally, click Task Manager .

2. Using Windows Run

If you’re a techy user and would instead run Task Manager with a command, you can use the Run window:

  • Press Win + R , or search for Run in the Start menu.
  • Type taskmgr in the Run window and click on Ok .

3. Using Keyboard Shortcut

There are two different keyboard shortcuts that you can use to launch the Task Manager very quickly.

For the first keyboard shortcut, press Ctrl + Alt + Delete and then select Task manager from the list of options. You can also power off your PC, sign out, and switch user accounts using this shortcut.

The second keyboard shortcut directly launches the Windows Task Manager. Simply press Ctrl + Shift + Esc , and the Task Manager window will pop up as usual.

4. Run Task Manager Through the Command Prompt

It might seem overkill to launch the Task Manager through the Command Prompt, nevertheless, it is possible, and here’s how you can do it:

  • Launch the Start menu and search for Command Prompt .
  • Click on the Best match, and the Command Prompt console will appear.
  • Type the below command, press enter, and Task Manager will launch immediately. taskmgr

Related: How to Customize the Command Prompt in Windows

Task Manager to the Rescue

The Windows Task Manager is an ever-important utility tool. Understanding how it works and how you can use it to optimize your PC is paramount. If you find your PC prone to unexpected crashes and frozen apps, the Task Manager is a good starting point to get to the root of the issue.

  • Mobile Computing

task manager keyboard

  • Good to know
  • VPN for streaming
  • VPNs for gaming
  • Privacy news
  • VPN reviews
  • Windows 11 News
  • Windows 11 Help
  • Windows tips
  • Windows Update
  • Data Recovery
  • File Sharing
  • Microsoft Office
  • Firefox add-ons
  • Chrome Extensions
  • Internet Explorer
  • Microsoft Edge
  • Google Maps
  • Google Android
  • Thunderbird
  • Crypto & Blockchain
  • Development
  • Music and Video

How to launch the old Task Manager in Windows 11

task manager keyboard

Microsoft launched a redesign of Windows 11's Task Manager some time ago. The new task manager has a different design but also functional differences. Microsoft removed the -- rather useless -- basic mode, added dark mode support, and removed the classic menu bar.

Regardless of the method that you use to open the Windows Task Manager , the new Task Manager opens after Windows 11 version 22H2 is installed on the device.

If you prefer the classic Windows Task Manager, you may be surprised to hear that you can still launch it on recent versions of Windows 11. X user Albacore revealed this recently on the social messaging site.

How to launch the classic Task Manager in Windows 11

Windows 11 Classic Task Manager

Microsoft never removed the classic Task Manager from Windows 11. It is still available. All that is required is to run the Task Manager with a special command to launch the classic one.

Here is how you do that:

  • Use the keyboard shortcut Windows-R to launch the run box.
  • Type taskmgr -d and press the Enter-key.

Windows launches the classic Task Manager. Note that the current Task Manager needs to be closed for the classic one to launch. This is the only requirement though.

Tip: you can create a shortcut that launches the classic Task Manager.

Classic Task Manager shortcut

Here is how that is done:

  • Right-click on a blank spot on the desktop and select New > Shortcut.
  • Type taskmgr.exe -d in the location field of the Create Shortcut window.
  • Select Next.
  • Pick a name for the shortcut, e.g. Task Manager.

You can now launch the classic Task Manager using the shortcut.

The classic Task Manager features the menu bar at the top. It uses tabs instead of a sidebar for the sections. If you have used the new Task Manager, you may notice that some features are missing.

The recently added search functionality is missing. It lacks Dark Mode support and the new keyboard shortcuts are also not supported.

Closing Words

It comes down to personal preferences. If you prefer the classic Task Manager, you may load it using the -d parameter. Add it as a shortcut on the desktop and you can launch it with a double-click on the shortcut.

There is no guarantee that this method will work in the future. Microsoft might remove code that could prevent the launching of the classic Task Manager on Windows devices.

Now You : do you use the Windows Task Manager?

How to launch the old Task Manager in Windows 11

Related content

Moment

Windows 11's Moment Update 5 is finally here: how to download

windows setup

Microsoft starts rollout of Windows DMA compliance changes in Europe

task manager keyboard

How to restore the Photos Legacy app on Windows

task manager keyboard

Add End Task to Windows 11's Taskbar to one-up Close Window

Windows Copilot Taskbar Icon

Windows 11: Microsoft replaces Show Desktop with Copilot on taskbar

Disable AI Bloatware on Windows 10 and 11 with BloatynosyAI

Disable AI Bloatware on Windows 10 and 11 with BloatynosyAI

Tutorials & tips.

task manager keyboard

4 Tested Ways to Install Windows 11 on Unsupported CPU

task manager keyboard

Stop Windows 11 Update Notifications & Automatic Installation

task manager keyboard

How To Upgrade to Windows 11 Using the Installation Assistant?

task manager keyboard

Windows 11 Installation Has Failed: How to Fix This Upgrade Error

…on the desktop create a folder and rename it to {ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C} This creates the GodMode system folder from which one can start all system administrative applications. Most of them start with the previous GUI….

correct name would be

GodMode.{ED7BA470-8E54-465E-825C-99712043E01C}

Thanks! The old task manager is better. Looks like the -d switch works with multiple programs that Microsoft ruined with modern bloat.

Nice trick to know but I use Process Explorer from Sysinternals.

I create a task to open it with admin rights while skipping UAC then make a shortcut to that task on the desktop.

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Advertisement

Spread the word, hot discussions.

task manager keyboard

Recently Updated

task manager keyboard

Latest from Softonic

  • Everything we know so far about the next game from the creator of Stardew Valley
  • The remake of Silent Hill 2 could arrive much sooner than we expected
  • One year after its launch, how has the SkyShowtime platform been doing?
  • One of the world’s most beloved extraterrestrials returns to anime for its twentieth anniversary

About gHacks

Ghacks is a technology news blog that was founded in 2005 by Martin Brinkmann. It has since then become one of the most popular tech news sites on the Internet with five authors and regular contributions from freelance writers.

  • Legal Information
  • Terms of use
  • Privacy Policy
  • Cookie Policy
  • Cookie settings
  • Advertise with Us
  • Martin Brinkmann
  • Mike Turcotte

task manager keyboard

10 Answers 10

Right-click the taskbar and click Task Manager. CTRL + Shift + Esc will serve the purpose if its not allowing to click anywhere.

Matthew Williams's user avatar

  • 1 Interesting, didn't know XP had that. –  RCIX Jul 20, 2009 at 22:51
  • 2 I can't tell you how many times I use that in a day! :-) –  JFV Jul 20, 2009 at 22:56
  • 6 Ctrl + Shift + Escape works too, I think Ctrl + Alt + Delete gives you back control over your own computer doesn't it? –  Ivo Flipse Jul 21, 2009 at 7:28
  • How about in an RDP connection to a Mac PC? –  S. Mayol Jun 28, 2016 at 20:54
  • 2 In my case (Windows 7 local, Windows Server 2012 remote), Ctrl+Shift+Esc was handled by the local system and not the remote one. pelms' answer however, Ctrl+Alt+End, worked just fine. –  nephtes Oct 12, 2016 at 15:42

Press Ctrl + Alt + End , then press t

mashuptwice's user avatar

  • ??? on what platform is that? Doesn't work on my XP... –  fretje Aug 6, 2009 at 14:35
  • Opps, Ctrl+Alt+End brings up the 'Window Security' dialog, added 't' for the Task Manager button. –  pelms Aug 6, 2009 at 15:17
  • +1 In my case, the remote machine was running a program which prohibited use of the taskbar and start menu. I was able to use this to kill that process. –  p.s.w.g Mar 24, 2014 at 13:22
  • 1 Nice trick to use after click "Exit Explorer". –  Ivan Chau Aug 14, 2017 at 9:07
  • This one just saved my bacon. Explorer was shut down from an installation, and restarting explorer.exe wasn't working. I was able to remotely log out and log back in to get the shell back. –  xofz Aug 1, 2018 at 20:00

Or click Start → Run, then type taskmgr .

slhck's user avatar

  • 3 I will have to remember. I incorrectly tried taskman... taskmgr taskmgr taskmgr :) –  Sun Oct 9, 2014 at 18:08

If Jonas may have been meaning he had a windowed remote desktop session, and he wondered what keyboard shortcut would open Task Manager on that remote, there is a shortcut for that (not mentioned yet in other answers here):

alt shift home

Since he mentioned using ctrl alt del , it seems most focused on showing how to do THAT against in the remote (windowed or not), or how to open task manager other ways in the remote. Those are not wrong answers, but if Jonas (or other readers finding this post) wondered if there was such a keyboard shortcut for a windowed RDP session, hope this helps.

I have a blog post with still more such shortcuts for a "windowed" remote desktop: Helpful keyboard shortcuts for working with "windowed" Remote Desktop: switching windows, more

charlie arehart's user avatar

You can set the Windows key combinations to go to the remote computer and use Ctrl-Shift-Esc to launch the Task Manager.

In the remote desktop connection options for Local Resources you have the option of where to apply Windows key combinations (On the local computer, On the remote computer, or only in full screen mode).

brian's user avatar

  • 2 Ctrl+Shift+Esc works for me like that by default... –  KovBal Jul 28, 2009 at 12:19
  • 1 Ctrl+Shift+Esc will work in full screen but if running in a window it will open the client PC's task manager –  pelms Aug 6, 2009 at 15:21

If you just needed to enumerate processes on remote PC, you do not need to establish RDP session.

Take a look at Remote Process Manager http://admintoyssuite.com/l/remote-task-manager--view-and-kill-processes-and-applications-on-network-desktop-computers/

I found this way more flexible than to disturb currently logged on user with RDP connection prompt. Remote Process Manager connects on-the-fly and do not show any question boxes to remote users..

David Herr's user avatar

  • David, could you please disclose your affiliation with the product according to the FAQ ? Excessive self-promoting is not welcome here. –  slhck Nov 27, 2012 at 14:45

Alt Ctrl Esc will work on Remote Desktop.

ashok's user avatar

  • I had a solid white screen but was successfully connected via RDP. This answer made my normal desktop appear. Kudos. Note: further testing reveals that Ctrl+Alt+Esc acts basically like a remote Alt+F4 (close window). –  semtex41 Jul 21, 2017 at 3:13
  • This does not work if you have a remote desktop inside a remote desktop. It only launches the task manager of the 1st remote. –  Andreas Jan 10, 2022 at 13:44

Ctrl + Shift + Esc doesn't work in windowed (non-full screen) mode. Host Task Manager will be invoked.

Ctrl + Alt + End doesn't work in nested RDP session. Menu for outer RDP session will be displayed.

If you need to start Task Manager to rescue your server in nested session / windowed mode - just switch to full screen mode temporary with Ctrl + Alt + Break where you can use Ctrl + Shift + Esc . This key combination will be send to the most nested RDP session in full screen mode.

Other cool tips: https://blog.codinghorror.com/remote-desktop-tips-and-tricks/

gavenkoa's user avatar

In nested remote desktop sessions the shortcut CTRL + ALT + Home brings up the taskmanager of the 1st remote Windows.

To invoke the taskmanager of the 2nd remote Windows I use the On-Screen Keyboard of the 1st remote Windows.

Andreas's user avatar

You have to use Ctrl F3 .

The details are on my blog: How to Open the Task Manager on Remote Computer or Desktop

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for browse other questions tagged windows remote-desktop task-manager ctrl-alt-delete ..

  • The Overflow Blog
  • Will antitrust suits benefit developers?
  • Featured on Meta
  • New Focus Styles & Updated Styling for Button Groups
  • Upcoming initiatives on Stack Overflow and across the Stack Exchange network
  • Google Cloud will be Sponsoring Super User SE

Hot Network Questions

  • What shape should the PCB edge have for this USB connector?
  • What is the History, Context, and Implications of the Term "Moonspeak"?
  • Is it appropriate to ask for a raise?
  • Making sense of binary logistic regression results/Interpreting odd ratio in r
  • Calculating the Volume with three given expression
  • How to get random polygons with points ordered mathematical positive?
  • Proof of bellman optimality equations
  • Should I cut or detach a ground wire for a light fixture to remove it?
  • A barred crossword for today
  • Train from Verona to Bolzano with bicycles (4 people)
  • Circles crossing every cell of an 8x8 grid
  • how could March 30th 2024. be followed by the 1st?
  • German equivalent titles which use continuous conjugation of verb
  • Can a declension form of adjective be used predicatively?
  • What are the dirty things that come out when you erase a mark called?
  • Is this a correct implementation of Comparator?
  • Simplest way to isolate MOSFET from MCU
  • Are humans more forgiving, and merciful than God?
  • Inside test in Geometry Nodes: Is a point located inside the convex hull?
  • With the recent security issue with xz, what should we do before using HomeBrew again?
  • How does energy become sound?
  • Capacitor connected with a DC source
  • How to encode a function from an existential type
  • How to become a FIDE CM?

task manager keyboard

task manager keyboard

Windows 11 power tip: How to use the old task manager

E very Windows user should know how to start the Windows 11 task manager: Press the CTRL + SHIFT + ESC keys simultaneously (there are also other options — for example, right-clicking on the taskbar and selecting “Task Manager” from the menu that then opens). Or press CTRL + ALT + DEL and then select Task Manager). You will then see the Task Manager in its current form, as it has been since Windows 11 22H2 .

get windows 11 pro for cheap

Windows 11 pro.

Price When Reviewed: 199.99 Best Prices Today: $59 at PCWorld Store – Win 11 Pro Upgrade Only | $79.99 at PCWorld Software Store

This current Windows 11 task manager is clearly organized: At the top left, you can minimize and maximize the left-hand menu using the burger icon. And on the right, you can see the actual contents, for example under “Processes” the running “Tasks.” If you want to end a program immediately — for example, because it froze — select it in the list and then click on the menu item “End task” at the top. The current task manager also supports the dark mode of Windows 11.

How to start the old task manager in Windows 11

But what about the old Windows task manager? It still exists, but you no longer start it using the key combination CTRL + SHIFT + ESC. Instead, open File Explorer and enter C:\Windows\SysWOW64\Taskmgr.exe in the address bar. The old task manager starts immediately.

It offers you the familiar view, so the burger symbol and the left selection menu are missing. Instead, it displays the running tasks centrally. The selection through the areas “Processes,” “Performance,” etc. is still made via the top menu bar. So overall less clear and visually less appealing, but just as useful. Ultimately, it’s a matter of taste which view you like better.

Important : You cannot use the new and the old task manager at the same time. So if the current task manager is already running, you cannot also start the old one (and vice versa).

This article was translated from German to English and originally appeared on pcwelt.de.

Windows 11 power tip: How to use the old task manager

  • All about AI
  • Google Bard
  • Inflection AI Pi Chatbot
  • Anthropic Claude
  • Generative AI
  • AI Image Generation
  • AI Regulation
  • AI Research
  • Large Language Models (LLM)
  • Surface Pro
  • Surface Laptop
  • Surface Book
  • Surface Duo
  • Surface Neo
  • Surface Studio
  • Surface Hub
  • Surface Pen
  • Surface Headphones
  • Surface Earbuds
  • About WinBuzzer
  • Follow Us: PUSH, Feeds, Social
  • Write for Us
  • Cookie Policy and Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Service

How to Open Device Manager in Windows 11 or Windows 10

We show you how to open Device Manager in Windows 11 and 10 using a Device Manager Shortcut, Settings, Command Prompt, and more.

Table of Contents:

Knowing how to swiftly open Device Manager in Windows 11 and Windows 10 is essential for managing your computer’s hardware. This tutorial will guide you through various methods to access Device Manager, helping you to efficiently update drivers, troubleshoot hardware issues, and ensure your system’s optimal performance.

What is Device Manager?

Device Manager is a component of Windows 11, 10, and earlier Microsoft OSes that allows users to view and make modifications to the hardware on their computer. It’s most commonly utilized for driver management – whether it’s installing, updating, or replacing them.   There are numerous ways to open it, from keyboard shortcut to the hidden tools menu, Command Prompt, Run, PowerShell, and more. We’ll be showing you the most relevant ones today.

⚠️   Please note:  The process described below is the same in Windows 11 as it is in Windows 10. However, bear in mind that we’ll be using screenshots from Windows 11, so your UI may look a little different. We’ll point out any changes you need to be aware of as they come up.

How to Open Device Manager in Windows 11 or Windows 10 via Keyboard Shortcut

For those who prefer using keyboard shortcuts for efficiency, this method provides quick access to Device Manager.

How to Open Device Manager via the Tools Menu Using Mouse or Touchpad

Alternatively, you can use a combination of the tools menu and your mouse. As you can press the shortcut to open the tools menu while keeping your hand on the mouse, you may find this is more convenient for you.

How to Open Device Manager from Search in Windows 11 or Windows 10

Sometimes it’s best not to complicate things. Getting to Device Manager via the search menu is slightly slower than using a shortcut, but it is much easier to remember.

How to Get to Device Manager via Settings

Accessing Device Manager through Windows Settings offers a more navigational approach, suitable for those who prefer using the settings menu.

How to Get to Windows 11 Device Manager via the Control Panel

If you want to be even more oldschool, you can also acces Device Manager via the legacy Control Panel app:

How to Open Device Manager from Run in Windows 11 / Windows 10

Another easy way to access Windows 11 Device Manager (or Windows 10 for that matter) is via the run dialog. Here’s how you can access it quickly:

How to Get to Windows 11 Device Manager from File Explorer

Accessing Device Manager through File Explorer is an alternative for users who prefer navigating through the file system.

  Select a file and keep pressing “ D ” on your keyboard until you find “ devmgmt.msc ” and double-click it to open.

How to Launch Device Manager from Command Prompt

If you don’t have GUI access you can open Device Manager from CMD with a very simple command.

How to Open Device Manager with the PowerShell Device Manager Command

If you prefer PowerShell over Command Prompt, that’s no problem – you can run Device Manager from there too.

FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions About Windows Device Manager

Can i create a taskbar shortcut for device manager.

While you cannot directly pin Device Manager to the taskbar, creating a workaround is possible. First, create a desktop shortcut by right-clicking on the desktop, choosing “ New ” > “ Shortcut “, entering “ devmgmt.msc ” for the location of the item, and finishing the creation process. Once the shortcut is on your desktop, right-click it and select “Pin to taskbar”. This places an easily accessible link to Device Manager right on your taskbar.

Can Device Manager be accessed from the Windows Recovery Environment?

Accessing Device Manager directly from the Windows Recovery Environment (WinRE) is not typically possible because WinRE is designed to provide a minimal environment for recovery tasks, rather than full system management functionalities. However, you can access Command Prompt from WinRE. Although typing “ devmgmt.msc ” may not launch Device Manager due to the limitations of WinRE, this environment is more suited for critical repair and recovery tasks using command-line utilities.

Is it possible to customize the list of devices shown in Device Manager?

The Device Manager interface provides minimal customization options for how devices are displayed. Users can choose to “ Show hidden devices ” from the “ View ” menu to display devices not actively connected, but there is no built-in functionality to customize the list by hiding specific devices or categories. The primary function of Device Manager is to provide a comprehensive view of all hardware components, ensuring nothing is inadvertently overlooked during troubleshooting.

Can I use Device Manager to track the history of installed drivers?

Device Manager itself does not maintain a history or log of driver installations or updates. To track driver changes, users must rely on Windows Update history for updates made through Windows Update or manually keep track of driver updates installed from manufacturer websites or other sources. Some third-party driver management tools offer history tracking capabilities, which can be helpful for keeping detailed logs of driver updates.

How do I fix errors indicated by yellow exclamation marks in Device Manager?

A yellow exclamation mark next to a device in Device Manager signifies an issue with that device, such as missing drivers or conflicting resources. To resolve these errors, right-click the problematic device and select “ Update driver “ to search for updated drivers online or on your computer. If updating doesn’t resolve the issue, try selecting “ Uninstall device ” and then restart your computer. Upon rebooting, Windows will attempt to reinstall the device and its drivers. If the problem persists, consult the device’s manufacturer website for specific drivers or troubleshooting guidance.

What’s the difference between disabling and uninstalling a device in Device Manager?

Disabling a device in Device Manager stops the device from functioning and consuming system resources without removing the device’s driver software, which makes it easy to re-enable the device if needed. Uninstalling, on the other hand, removes the device’s drivers from the system, and might require reinstallation of the software if you decide to use the device again. Choose to disable when temporarily not using a device, and uninstall to potentially resolve software conflicts or when preparing to replace or stop using the hardware indefinitely.

How do I export a list of devices from Device Manager?

Device Manager does not offer a direct export feature for the list of devices. However, a workaround involves using the Windows “System Information” tool. Open System Information by searching for it in the Start menu, navigate to “ Components ” > “ Problem Devices ” or any other relevant section, then use “ File ” > “ Export ” to save the details in a text file. This method can be used to create a comprehensive report of all hardware devices on your system, though it might require some manual sorting to focus solely on devices typically managed within Device Manager.

Can Device Manager be used to update BIOS?

No, Device Manager is not suitable for updating the BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) or firmware of a computer. BIOS updates are critical and must be handled with care, as incorrect updates can severely affect system functionality. To update your BIOS, download the update from the official manufacturer’s website for your motherboard or pre-built system, and follow their specific instructions closely, which often involve executing the update from a USB drive or directly within the BIOS interface itself.

Why do some devices appear as ‘Unknown’ in Device Manager?

Devices are shown as ‘Unknown’ in Device Manager when Windows cannot recognize the device or find appropriate drivers for it. This situation often arises with newly connected hardware or after a system upgrade where existing drivers are not compatible. To resolve this, right-click the unknown device, select “ Properties “, navigate to the “Details” tab, and select “ Hardware Ids ” from the dropdown menu. Use these identifiers to search online or on the manufacturer’s website for the correct driver. Installing the appropriate driver should resolve the ‘Unknown’ status.

Is there a way to see only the devices with issues in Device Manager?

Directly within Device Manager, there is no filter to display only problematic devices. However, any device experiencing issues will typically be marked with an exclamation point, making them visually distinguishable. For a more focused view, other system utilities or third-party software must be used to analyze and report on device health and status comprehensively, but such tools extend beyond the scope of Device Manager’s functionalities.

Can Device Manager tell me if my drivers are up to date?

While Device Manager can search for and indicate whether the current driver is the newest version it can find online through Microsoft’s driver database, it does not guarantee that the driver is the absolute latest released by the hardware manufacturer. For critical or high-performance hardware, it is advisable to check the manufacturer’s website directly for the latest drivers, as they may offer updates that provide better functionality or performance not yet available through Windows Update.

How can I see the driver version for a device in Device Manager?

To view the version of a driver installed for a specific device in Device Manager, right-click the device and choose “ Properties “, navigate to the “ Driver ” tab. This section displays the driver version, provider, date, and other relevant details. If updates or rollbacks are necessary, this tab also provides options to manage the driver directly.

What does it mean when a device is listed multiple times in Device Manager?

A device appearing multiple times in Device Manager may signal several situations: multiple components of the device require drivers, a device has been duplicated due to software errors, or there are virtual instances created by software applications. It’s essential to investigate each instance—checking device properties can clarify whether they represent distinct components or an issue. If suspected as a duplication error, uninstalling the duplicates and rescanning for hardware changes can rectify the situation.

How do I identify a device that Windows cannot determine in Device Manager?

For devices listed as ‘ Unknown ‘ in Device Manager, identification can be initiated by right-clicking the device, selecting “ Properties “, switching to the “ Details ” tab, and then using the “ Hardware Ids ” property. These IDs consist of vendor and device codes, which can be searched online or directly on the manufacturer’s website to identify the device accurately. Once identified, the corresponding drivers can be sought out and installed to resolve the ‘Unknown’ status.

Can changing settings in Device Manager improve system performance?

Adjustments in Device Manager, such as updating drivers or disabling non-essential devices, can potentially enhance system performance, especially if outdated drivers are causing conflicts or if disabled devices free up resources. However, caution is advised as incorrect settings can lead to system instability. Advanced users might tweak settings specific to performance, like DMA (Direct Memory Access) for IDE controllers or interrupt assignments, but these adjustments should be based on thorough knowledge or following expert recommendations.

Related: How to Backup and Restore Windows Drivers

task manager keyboard

Related: How to Identify and Kill Any Process in Windows 11 and Windows 10

How to Identify and Kill Any Process in Windows 10

Related: How to Open Command Prompt with the “Open Command Window Here” in File Explorer

How to return the 'Open command window here' option to Windows 10's context menu

  • Command Prompt
  • Control Panel
  • Desktop Operating Systems
  • Device Manager
  • how to get to device manager
  • how to open device manager
  • Microsoft Windows
  • open device manager from cmd
  • Operating Systems
  • powershell device manager

Recent News

Visual-Studio-17-Logo

Microsoft Unveils Experimental MSBuild Editor to Simplify Developer Workflows

Artificial Intelligence AI

GPT-5 and Llama 3 Set to Transform AI Landscape, Arriving Sooner...

Subscribe to WinBuzzer on Google News

task manager keyboard

task manager keyboard

Announcing Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22635.3420 (Beta Channel)

  • Amanda Langowski
  • Brandon LeBlanc

Hello Windows Insiders, today we are releasing Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22635.3420 (KB 5035953) to the Beta Channel.

REMINDER: All Windows Insiders in the Beta Channel will now be on the same build (Build 22635.xxxx) via  an enablement package . For Windows Insiders in the Beta Channel who want to be the first to get features gradually rolled out to you , you can turn ON the toggle (shown in the image below) to get the latest updates as they are available via Settings > Windows Update. Over time, we will increase the rollouts of features to everyone with the toggle turned on. Should you keep this toggle off, new features will gradually be rolled out to your device over time once they are ready.

Turn on the toggle to get the latest updates as they are available to get new features rolled out to you.

Going forward, we will document changes in Beta Channel builds in two buckets: new features, improvements, and fixes that are being gradually rolled out for Insiders who have turned on the toggle to get the latest updates as they are available and then new features, improvements, and fixes available to everyone in the Beta Channel.

New features gradually being rolled out to the Beta Channel with toggle on*

New position for the widgets entry-point on left-aligned taskbars .

We’re beginning to roll out a new position for the Widgets entry-point on left-aligned taskbars. The taskbar entry-point will move to the left of the systems tray and will be wider so you can see richer content from Widgets on your taskbar. When you launch the Widgets board, it will fly out from the right side instead of the left side.

The Widgets entry-point at its new position to the left of system tray on a left-aligned taskbar.

FEEDBACK: Please file feedback in Feedback Hub (WIN + F) under Desktop Environment > Widgets.

Changes and Improvements gradually being rolled out to the Beta Channel with toggle on*

[file explorer] .

  • In response to feedback from Windows Insiders, drag-and-drop files with your mouse functionality between breadcrumbs is now available in the File Explorer Address Bar. We are beginning to roll this out today, so not all Insiders in the Beta Channel will see it right away.

[Windows Share]

  • Users will be able to now generate QR codes for URLs and cloud file links through the Windows share window to seamlessly share webpages and files across their devices. To try this out in Microsoft Edge, just click the share button in the Edge toolbar and choose “Windows share options”.

Option to generate a QR code to share a URL through the Windows share window.

  • To prevent accidentally closing the Windows share window, clicking outside the Windows share window will no longer close it. To close the Windows share window, just press the close button at the top right corner.

[Windows Backup]

  • If you have both Personalization and Other Windows settings toggled on under Settings > Accounts > Windows backup , many of your sound settings (including chosen sound scheme) will be backed up which can be restored via the Windows Backup app.
  • We’re beginning to roll out the ability to sign-in with your Microsoft account (MSA) directly within the Windows Backup app to save backups to your account.

Fixes gradually being rolled out to the Beta Channel with toggle on*

[file explorer].

  • Fixed an issue causing File Explorer to crash on launch for a small number of Insiders in the previous flight.

[Multiple Desktops]

  • Fixed an issue where the option to set a different wallpaper on each desktop wasn’t working.
  • Fixed an issue which could potentially result in no app results showing in search anymore.

[Task Manager]

  • Fixed an issue where Task Manager was holding onto process handles sometimes, leading to processes not stopping when you closed apps if you’d had Task Manager open.

Changes and Improvements gradually being rolled out to everyone in the Beta Channel

[copilot in windows*].

  • You can ask Copilot in Windows (in preview) for help ten times when you sign in to Windows using a local account. After that, you must sign in using a Microsoft account (MSA) or a  Microsoft Entra ID account (formerly Azure Active Directory (Azure AD)). To sign in, use the link in the dialog that appears in Copilot in Windows. If you do not sign in, some Copilot features might not work. To learn more, see  Welcome to Copilot in Windows  and  Manage Copilot in Windows .

[Lock screen]

  • This update adds Weather and more to your lock screen. Stay informed and efficient with dynamic updates that bring finance, traffic, and sports to your Lock screen, alongside weather. The card design has been improved with acrylic blur, card size, spacing, and font optimizations.To turn on this feature, go to Settings > Personalization > Lock screen . To learn more, see  Personalize your lock screen . Note this feature might not be available to all users because it will roll out gradually.

Finance, traffic, and sports content along with weather on the Lock screen.

Fixes for everyone in the Beta Channel

  • New! This update affects Windows Hello for Business. IT admins can now use mobile device management (MDM) to turn off the prompt that appears when users sign in to an Entra-joined machine. To do this, they can turn on the “DisablePostLogonProvisioning” policy setting. After a user signs in, provisioning is off for Windows 10 and Windows 11 devices.
  • New! This update improves the Remote Desktop Session Host. You can now set up its “clipboard redirection” policy to work in a single direction from the local computer to the remote computer. You can also reverse that order.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the Combine taskbar buttons and hide labels The app labels in the taskbar sometimes do not have the correct length, which cuts off the label text. This occurs when this setting is set to “When taskbar is full” or “Never.”
  • This update addresses an issue that affects certain Neural Processing Units (NPU). They do not show in Task Manager.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects a network resource. You cannot access it from a Remote Desktop session. This occurs when you turn on the Remote Credential Guard feature and the client is Windows 11, version 22H2 or higher.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects Windows Defender Application Control (WDAC). It prevents a stop error that occurs when you apply more than 32 policies.
  • This update addresses a deadlock issue in CloudAP. It occurs when different users sign in and sign out at the same time on virtual machines.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the Group Policy service. It fails after you use exe to apply an audit policy to the system.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the Settings app. It stops responding when you use it to remove Bluetooth devices.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects Notepad. It fails to print to certain Internet Printing Protocol (IPP) printers when you use a print support app.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects dsamain.exe . When the Knowledge Consistency Checker (KCC) runs evaluations, it stops responding.
  • This update addresses an issue that stops some apps and features from being available. This occurs after you upgrade to Windows 11.
  • This update affects MSIX applications. It helps their UI to localize correctly for all languages when you upgrade your OS.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the Microsoft Message Queue (MSMQ) PowerShell module. It does not load.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the existing AppLocker rule collection enforcement mode. It is not overwritten when rules merge with a collection that has no rules. This occurs when the enforcement mode is set to “Not Configured.”
  • This update addresses an issue that affects Transport Layer Security (TLS), version 1.3. It causes Azure App Services to fail. This occurs when the web server attempts to connect to a third-party Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) server.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the touch keyboard and the candidate window for the Japanese and Chinese Input Method Editors (IME). They do not show after you come out of Modern Standby. To learn more, see Microsoft Japanese IME and What is Modern Standby .
  • This update addresses an issue that affects some wireless headphones. Bluetooth connections are not stable. This occurs on devices that have firmware from April 2023 and later.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects USB audio. It fails on some processors. This occurs after you pause, play, or resume from sleep.
  • This update supports DST changes in To learn more, see Interim guidance for Kazakhstan time zone changes 2024 .
  • This update supports DST changes in To learn more, see Interim guidance for Samoa DST changes 2021 .
  • This update supports daylight saving time (DST) changes in Greenland. To learn more, see Greenland 2023 time zone update now available .
  • This update supports daylight saving time (DST) changes in To learn more, see Interim guidance for DST changes announced by Palestinian Authority for 2024, 2025 .
  • This update addresses an issue that affects Secure Launch. It does not run on some processors.
  • This update addresses a reliability issue. It affects a Virtual Remote App product when you use a custom shell to open it.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects Containers that you create or deploy. Their status does not progress past “ContainerCreating.”
  • This update makes Country and Operator Settings Asset (COSA) profiles up to date for some mobile operators.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the COM+ component. Some applications that depend on it stop responding.
  • This update addresses an issue that affects the time service. You can configure it using mobile device management (MDM) or a Group Policy Object (GPO). But the Windows Settings app does not match what you have configured.
  • This update addresses an issue that occurs when you use LoadImage() to load a top-down bitmap. If the bitmap has a negative height, the image does not load and the function returns NULL.

Known issues

  • We are investigating an issue where Internet Information Services (IIS) and Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) may not work after installing this update.
  • [NEW] Using Shift + F10 will unexpectedly open Show More Options in the File Explorer context menu in this build.

Windows Insiders in the Beta Channel who have the new position for the Widgets entry-point on left-aligned taskbars may see the following known issues:

  • [NEW] Swipe invocation for Widgets may not work if taskbar is center-aligned instead of left-aligned.
  • [NEW] Unpinning Widgets from the taskbar may not work if taskbar is center-aligned instead of left-aligned.
  • [NEW] The Widgets board is incorrectly positioned when Copilot is in side-by-side mode.
  • [NEW] Turning on/off Widgets in taskbar settings may refresh the taskbar.

About the Beta Channel

The Beta Channel is the place we preview experiences that are closer to what we will ship to our general customers. Because the Dev and Beta Channels represent parallel development paths from our engineers, there may be cases where features and experiences show up in the Beta Channel first. However, this does not mean every feature we try out in the Beta Channel will ship. We encourage Insiders to  read this blog post that outlines the ways we’ll try things out with Insiders in both the Dev and Beta Channels.

* Getting new features: For Windows Insiders in the Beta Channel who want to be the first to get features gradually rolled out to you, you can turn ON the toggle to get the latest updates as they are available via Settings > Windows Update. Over time, we will increase the rollouts of features to everyone with the toggle turned on. Should you keep this toggle off, new features will gradually be rolled out to your device over time once they are ready.

**Availability of Copilot in Windows:  Copilot in Windows in preview is being rolled out gradually to Windows Insiders in select global markets. The initial markets for the Copilot in Windows preview include North America, United Kingdom and parts of Asia and South America. It is our intention to add additional markets over time.

Important Insider Links

  • Want to learn how we made Windows 11? Check out the Inside Windows 11 website to hear and meet our makers from Engineering, Design and Research to share their insights and unique perspectives throughout this journey.
  • You can check out our Windows Insider Program documentation here .
  • Check out Flight Hub for a complete look at what build is in which Insider channel.

Thanks, Amanda & Brandon

How-To Geek

How to quickly launch apps on windows 11 using keyboard shortcuts.

Load your Windows programs from the comfort of your keyboard.

Quick Links

How to use taskbar shortcuts to open apps, how to use app properties shortcuts to open apps, how to use powertoys to open apps, how to use autohotkey to open apps.

If you access particular Windows apps regularly, it can take time to launch them by rummaging through the Start menu. Handily, Windows 11 lets you create custom keyboard shortcuts to quickly open your favorite programs.

One of the awesome features of the Windows 11 taskbar is the ability to pin your frequently used applications to it. Once pinned, you can use the Windows+AppNumber shortcut to launch it. Here, "AppNumber" is the order in which the app appears on the taskbar.

To pin an app to the taskbar, search for the program in the Start menu, right-click it, and select "Pin to Taskbar". Alternatively, find the program in File Explorer, then hold the Shift key and right-click it, and select "Pin to Taskbar."

Once pinned to the taskbar, click and drag the icons to move them to a different position.

Your taskbar may have items like the search bar, task view, and widgets—these are not launchable through this specific keyboard shortcut. So, the app that you pin after these takes slot one, which you can open by pressing Windows+1 on your keyboard.

You may already have File Explorer pinned to your taskbar , as Windows 11 does this by default. If so, this does support the Windows+AppNumber shortcut.

In the screenshot below, File Explorer is first and Steam (highlighted) is fourth. This is because we don't count the Windows button, the search bar, or the task view icon. Since Steam is fourth, I can launch it by pressing Windows+4.

While this method is fairly simple, its biggest drawback is that you can only use the taskbar shortcuts for a maximum of ten applications, with Win+0 being the key combination to launch the tenth.

If you want to go beyond the ten apps restriction of the previous method, you can set a keyboard shortcut within the app's properties.

To do so, you need to create a shortcut file for the application. First, locate the program's EXE file through File Explorer. Then, press and hold the Shift key while right-clicking on the executable, and select "Create Shortcut."

Right-click on the newly created shortcut and select "Properties" to open another window.

Within the "Shortcut Key" field, press a key. This creates a shortcut using the Ctrl and Alt keys. For example, in the screenshot below, I pressed "A" which created a shortcut of Ctrl + Alt + A. Once done, click "OK".

To remove a shortcut, press the Delete key within the "Shortcut Key" field.

You can change "Ctrl + Alt" to "Shift + Alt" if you hold those keys while pressing your other desired key. Overall, though, this method is a bit limiting because you don't have complete control over the keys used.

PowerToys adds lots of useful features to Windows . It's an official Microsoft utility, which you can download through the Microsoft Store . One component of PowerToys is the Keyboard Manager, which lets you remap keys and create your own shortcuts. It offers more freedom compared to the previous methods.

To begin, open PowerToys and navigate to the Keyboard Manager. Turn the "Enable Keyboard Manager" toggle on if it's not already, then select "Remap a shortcut."

To create your shortcut, first click "Add Shortcut Remapping." Click the pencil next to "Shortcut" and press the keys for your shortcut, then "OK" when done.

Next, use the "Action" dropdown and click "Run Program", then click "Select Program" and find the program you want your shortcut to open.

Optionally, change the other settings. An important one is "If Running", which chooses what to do if you already have the program open. Finally, click "OK" in the top-right.

If you ever want to delete a shortcut, return to this screen and click the trash can.

AutoHotkey is a third-party tool that allows you to create macros which you can map to any function, including creating custom keyboard shortcuts to launch an app. AutoHotkey is significantly more powerful than the other options we've mentioned so far, though its reliance on scripting means it has a higher learning curve.

Go to the AutoHotkey website , then download and install it. Once done, launch AutoHotkey and select "New Script."

Next, give your script a name and select the "Edit" button.

Choose Notepad (or a development environment of your choosing, if you're an advanced user) as the code editor and press "OK."

You’ll be greeted with an empty script. You can use the following syntax for creating a macro:

Here, "Key1" and "Key2" are two separate keys.

"Application" is full path to the executable you wish to launch using the shortcut. To get this, find the program's EXE in File Explorer. Then, hold Shift and right-click it, and select "Copy as Path." This copies the path to your clipboard.

In my case, I've used the following code:

This code allows me to press Tab + A to launch Steam.

Once you've written the script, save it, then launch the file to activate the keyboard shortcut.

Each of these methods has a different level of complexity, so choose whichever works best for you. They'll all save you time!

IMAGES

  1. Shortcut For Task Manager: How to Open Task Manager Using Shortcut Keys

    task manager keyboard

  2. How to open Task Manager in Windows 11 (7 ways)

    task manager keyboard

  3. How to open the Windows Task Manager

    task manager keyboard

  4. How to open the Task Manager in Windows 10 (all shortcuts)

    task manager keyboard

  5. Windows 11 task manager shortcut

    task manager keyboard

  6. How to open the Task Manager in Windows 10 (all shortcuts)

    task manager keyboard

VIDEO

  1. Keyboard shortcut keys

  2. Most Commonly Used Keyboard Shortcuts l #ELECRTRIC Class# l

  3. shortcut key to open Task manager in windows PC ll #shortsfeed #shorts #taskmanager

  4. Computer shortcuts ,windows key shortcuts,keyboard shortcuts

  5. Красивая панель задач с помощью TaskbarX и T-clock! Подробный туториал!

  6. Shortcut key for Task Manager #shorts #viral

COMMENTS

  1. How to Open the Task Manager in Windows 10

    From the Start menu to keyboard shortcuts, there are multiple ways to open Task Manager in Windows 10. Here are the most common ways to do it: Press Ctrl + Shift + Esc. Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete. Open Power User Menu by pressing Win+X. Right-click the taskbar.

  2. 10 Ways to Open Task Manager in Windows 11

    To open Task Manager on Windows 11, follow these steps: Click the Start menu in your taskbar. Start typing "Task Manager". When the "Task Manager" utility appears, click it. Alternatively, use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Shift+Esc. Launching Windows 11's Task Manager utility is as easy as selecting an option in the Start menu, pressing a ...

  3. 11 Fast Ways to Open Task Manager in Windows 10, 11, and 8

    1. Press ⊞ Win + S to open Windows Search. This method uses the built-in Control Panel app to open the Task Manager. 2. Type "control panel" in the search bar and select Control Panel. This will open the Control Panel in a new window. 3. Type "task manager" in the top right search bar.

  4. 12 Ways to Open the Task Manager in Windows 10

    1. Use a Keyboard Shortcut. The easiest and quickest way to launch Task Manager is to use the tool's keyboard shortcut. When pressed, this shortcut quickly opens the Task Manager utility on your Windows 10 PC. To use this method, press the Ctrl + Shift + Esc keys simultaneously on your keyboard.

  5. Windows Task Manager: The Complete Guide

    Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to open the Task Manager with a keyboard shortcut or right-click the Windows taskbar and select "Task Manager." ... The Task Manager will remember your preference and will open to the more advanced view in the future. If you want to get back to the simple view, click "Fewer Details." With More Details selected, the Task ...

  6. 12 Shortcut Ways To Open Task Manager in Windows 10/11

    Just press Ctrl+Alt+Delete keys on the keyboard and click on Task Manager from the list of options that pop up. Open from Windows power user menu. The Windows 10 power user menu also has an entry for the Task Manager. To access it, either right-click on the Start menu button or press Windows+X keys. When the power user menu opens, click on the ...

  7. How to open Task Manager on Windows

    3. Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete, then click Task Manager. (Image credit: Logitech) The third, and probably most familiar, way to open the task manager is through the Ctrl + Alt + Delete menu. This is the ...

  8. How to Launch Task Manager in Windows 11

    Press Ctrl+Shift+Escape. Right-Click the Start Button. Search in Start. Use the Command Prompt. Use the Run Window. Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete. In Windows 11, Task Manager is no longer just a right-click away on the taskbar. Whether you're troubleshooting or just keeping an eye on your system resources, here are six different ways to launch it instead.

  9. 9 Ways to Open Task Manager on Windows 10 and Windows 11

    Step 1: Right-click anywhere on the desktop, go to New, and choose Shortcut. Step 2: Now, type taskmgr.exe in the location field and click on Next. Step 3: Enter Task Manager as the shortcut's ...

  10. 10 Ways to Open the Task Manager in Windows

    An easier way to open the Task Manager in Windows is to use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Shift + Esc. There are plenty of keyboard shortcuts in Windows, but since the Task Manager is an application that you frequently access, it is worthwhile to remember this shortcut for quick access. 3. Using Command Prompt.

  11. 6 effective ways to open Task Manager in Windows 10 or Windows 11

    1. Open the Task Manager with a keyboard shortcut. One of my personal favorites and probably the simplest one on this list, you can launch the Task Manager simply by pressing Ctrl + All + Delete ...

  12. How to open the Task Manager in Windows 11 and Windows 10

    7. Use the search function to start the Task Manager. You can also search for the Task Manager in order to launch it. Just click or tap the Start button in the taskbar or press the Windows key on your keyboard, then type task manager.After a short while, Windows begins displaying the search results.

  13. Shortcut Keys to Open Task Manager on Windows 10/11

    The following Task Manager shortcut methods can provide that easy access: Method 1: How to Open Task Manager using a Keyboard Shortcut. The fastest path to access Task Manager is to use the built-in keyboard shortcut that is standard on the Windows operating system. This keyboard is the easiest Task Manager shortcut when functioning correctly.

  14. Keyboard Shortcut to Open Task Manager in Windows 10

    Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc on your keyboard and Windows will open the task manager instantly. There is more than one way to open the task manager in Windows 10. We can access Task Manager by right-clicking the taskbar and choosing Task Manager. Another way is to right-click the Start button, and then choose Task Manager from the Quick Link menu.

  15. How to Open Task Manager in Windows 10

    Press the WIN + R keys on the keyboard to open the run dialogue. Type "taskmgr" and click "Ok" to open the Task Manager. 6. How to Open Task Manager from the Taskbar. You can open the Task Manager from Taskbar too. Right-click on an empty space in the taskbar then select "Task Manager".

  16. How to Open the Task Manager in Windows 11 (8 Methods)

    1. Press the Windows 11 keyboard shortcut " Ctrl + Shift + Esc " to instantly launch the Task Manager in Windows 11. 2. You can also press the " Ctrl + Alt + Delete " hotkey to open the Advanced menu. Here, click on "Task Manager" to check the CPU, GPU, and RAM usage of apps and processes on your Windows 11 PC. 3.

  17. How to Launch Task Manager with a Keyboard Shortcut

    The Task Manager keyboard shortcut in all recent versions of Windows is Control-Shift-Escape. Just mash those keys on your keyboard at any time to directly launch the Task Manager, with the ...

  18. Seven Ways to Open the Windows Task Manager

    Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc. The quickest way to bring up Task Manager---assuming your keyboard's working---is to just press Ctrl+Shift+Esc. As a bonus, Ctrl+Shift+Esc offers a quick way to bring up Task Manager while using Remote Desktop or working inside a virtual machine (since Ctrl+Alt+Delete would signal your local machine instead).

  19. How to Run Task Manager on Windows 11 (6-Ways)

    Method 3: Ctrl+Alt+Delete. On the keyboard, press "Ctrl + Alt + Delete," you will see few options. To open Task Manager, select "Task Manager." Method 4: Start Button. To open Task Manager, right-click the Start button on the taskbar. Select "Task Manager" from the menu that appears, and Task Manager will be launched.

  20. 4 Ways to Access the Task Manager on Windows 11

    Locate the Start menu icon on the taskbar (look for the Windows logo icon). Right-click on the Start icon and a context menu will pop up. Finally, click Task Manager . 2. Using Windows Run. If you're a techy user and would instead run Task Manager with a command, you can use the Run window: Press Win + R, or search for Run in the Start menu.

  21. How to launch the old Task Manager in Windows 11

    Here is how that is done: Right-click on a blank spot on the desktop and select New > Shortcut. Type taskmgr.exe -d in the location field of the Create Shortcut window. Select Next. Pick a name for the shortcut, e.g. Task Manager. You can now launch the classic Task Manager using the shortcut.

  22. How do I open the Windows Task Manager during a Remote Desktop session?

    3. You can set the Windows key combinations to go to the remote computer and use Ctrl-Shift-Esc to launch the Task Manager. In the remote desktop connection options for Local Resources you have the option of where to apply Windows key combinations (On the local computer, On the remote computer, or only in full screen mode).

  23. Windows 11 power tip: How to use the old task manager

    E very Windows user should know how to start the Windows 11 task manager: Press the CTRL + SHIFT + ESC keys simultaneously (there are also other options — for example, right-clicking on the ...

  24. How to Open Device Manager in Windows 11 or Windows 10

    Open Windows Settings. Open the settings cog in the start menu or press " Windows + I" on your keyboard to directly open Settings. Open System Settings. Proceed by clicking on " System ...

  25. How to End a Task Using Windows 10's Task Manager

    First, open Task Manager. To do so, right-click the taskbar and select "Task Manager" from the pop-up menu. Alternately, you can press Ctrl+Shift+Escape to open it, or press Ctrl+Alt+Delete and select "Task Manager" from the screen that appears. Related: Seven Ways to Open the Windows Task Manager. If Task Manager opens in simple mode and you ...

  26. Announcing Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22635.3420 (Beta Channel)

    [Task Manager] Fixed an issue where Task Manager was holding onto process handles sometimes, leading to processes not stopping when you closed apps if you'd had Task Manager open. ... This update addresses an issue that affects the touch keyboard and the candidate window for the Japanese and Chinese Input Method Editors (IME). They do not ...

  27. How to Quickly Launch Apps on Windows 11 Using Keyboard Shortcuts

    To begin, open PowerToys and navigate to the Keyboard Manager. Turn the "Enable Keyboard Manager" toggle on if it's not already, then select "Remap a shortcut." To create your shortcut, first click "Add Shortcut Remapping." Click the pencil next to "Shortcut" and press the keys for your shortcut, then "OK" when done.