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Clause Worksheets

In grammar a clause is a group of words that contains a subject and verb. All sentences are clauses, but not all clauses are sentences. This is because some clauses are independent, which means they can stand alone as a complete thought. These are the ones that may be a sentence. There are also dependent clauses, which do not express a complete thought and are not sentences. You may view each of the worksheets below by clicking on the title. They are free for home use or classroom use.

Helpful Clause Definitions and Examples

What is an Independent Clause? What is a Dependent Clause? What is an Adjective Clause? What is a Noun Clause?

Printable Clause Worksheet Activities

Find the subordinate clause.

Find the Subordinate Clause

Can your little detective find the subordinate clause in each of the sentences?

Commas and Introductory Elements: Clauses

Commas and Introductory Elements: Clauses

May we introduce your student to introductory clauses?

Adverb Clauses in Sentences

Adverb Clauses in Sentences

Your student will identify the adverb clauses in this worksheet.

Is It an Independent Clause or a Dependent Clause?

Is It an Independent Clause or a Dependent Clause?

Time to identify the clause: independent or dependent?

Noun Clauses: Acting as a Noun

Noun Clauses: Acting as a Noun

Here’s a worksheet on finding the function of a noun phrase in a sentence!

Progressive Story: Adverb Clauses

Progressive Story: Adverb Clauses

This worksheet is on the go with a field trip to the transportation museum!

Progressive Story: Relative Clauses

Progressive Story: Relative Clauses

This progressive story is a fun way to work with relative clauses.

Relative Clauses: Acting Like Adjectives

Relative Clauses: Acting Like Adjectives

In this worksheet your student will use relative, or adjective, clauses to combine sentences.

Relative Clauses: Breaking Apart

Relative Clauses: Breaking Apart

Here your student will change one sentence into two by eliminating the relative clause.

Relative Clauses: Restrictive and Non-Restrictive

Relative Clauses: Restrictive and Non-Restrictive

Your student will identify which relative clauses are restrictive and which are non-restrictive in this worksheet.

Relative Clauses: What Is It Modifying?

Relative Clauses: What Is It Modifying?

Time to identify the relative clause and the noun it modifies!

Writing with Noun Clauses

Writing with Noun Clauses

Let’s write some sentences using noun phrases!

Add a Dependent Clause to an Independent Clause

Add a Dependent Clause to an Independent Clause

In this worksheet your student will add dependent clauses to add interest.

Add an Independent Clause to a Dependent Clause

Add an Independent Clause to a Dependent Clause

These dependent clauses are looking for an independent clause!

Colons Used With Explanations

Colons Used With Explanations

Here is some practice on using colons with explanations.

Conjunctive Adverbs and Independent Clauses

Conjunctive Adverbs and Independent Clauses

Conjunctive adverbs can work like a conjunction when they connect independent clauses.

Semicolon and Independent Clauses

Semicolon and Independent Clauses

Let’s substitute a semicolon for a coordinating conjunction!

What Kind of Dependent Clause Is It?

What Kind of Dependent Clause Is It?

Your student is asked to name the function of the dependent clause in this worksheet.

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Clause Worksheets | Types of Clauses

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Our free, printable worksheets on types of clauses such as independent, dependent, noun, adjective, and adverbial clauses encompass diverse exercises to provide a multidimensional exposure on how these clauses work within a sentence to combine additional chunks of information.

These Clause worksheets pdf are specially designed for children in grade 8, grade 9, and grade 10.

Independent Clauses

Gain expertise in identifying the two independent or main clauses that make complete sense, just like simple sentences, with our printable worksheets on independent clauses.

Independent Clauses

Dependent Clauses

Learners in 8th grade, 9th grade and 10th grade will have a lot of takeaways from these pdf worksheets on dependent or subordinate clauses, uncovering their diversity and versatility.

Dependent Clauses

Noun Clauses

Name a person, place, thing, or an idea when just one word may not suffice. Come along and explore the wonders that a noun clause can do!

Noun Clauses

Adjective Clauses

With our pdf worksheets on adjective clauses, have students discover anew how a group of words works together to describe a noun.

Adjective Clauses

Adverbial Clauses

Can we have an entire clause to qualify the meaning of a verb, an adjective, or an adverb in a sentence? Work through our printable adverbial clauses worksheets and find out!

Adverbial Clauses

Related Printable Worksheets

▶ Phrases

▶ Direct and Indirect Speech

▶ Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences

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Clauses and Phrases

Skip to the clauses and phrases worksheets and activities

Clauses and phrases are the building blocks of sentences. Every sentence must have at least one clause to be considered grammatically correct. Understanding how clauses and phrases work will help you better understand sentence structure. You’ll need to have a working knowledge of subjects, predicates, and objects before you continue .

A sentence can have more than one clause, but it needs AT LEAST ONE CLAUSE or it is a fragment, not a sentence.

In the first example sentence, the action is took . Ask yourself, "Who took?" Since I takes the verb, I is the subject. Together, the subject and the predicate form a clause . So the first example sentence has one clause.

The predicate in the second sentence is love . So we ask ourselves, "who loves?" The answer to this question is I , so I takes the predicate love . Together, they form a clause. But there is another predicate in this sentence. Spend is also a predicate. Once again, the subject I takes this predicate. So this example sentence has one subject and predicate working together in the first clause, and a second subject and predicate working together in the next clause. The second example sentence has two clauses .

Phrases do not contain a subject and a predicate , or we would call them clauses. Phrases provide additional information about subjects, predicates, and / or objects. Understanding how phrases work is helpful when analyzing sentence structure.

In these example sentences, the phrases are red . The first example sentence has a predicate, fell , and a subject, Jack . The phrase provides additional information about the subject, but it is not required to form a complete sentence. The phrase does not contain a subject and a predicate. It cannot grammatically stand by itself.

In the second example sentence, the predicate is left and the subject is I . On the other side of the sentence, a phrase provides additional information about an object in the sentence, Whole Foods. Phrases can come at the beginning, middle, or end of sentences. Try reading the sentence without the phrase and notice that the sentence does not actually NEED the phrase. It is grammatically nonessential. Then try reading the phrase without the rest of the sentence. Notice that it hangs? The phrase depends on the sentence to complete its meaning.

Clauses and Phrases Worksheets and Activities

This is a preview image of Clauses at the Mall Worksheet. Click on it to enlarge it or view the source file.

Clauses and Phrases Common Core State Standards

50 comments.

Can u explain dependent and independent phrase and clause

Independent clauses have a subject and a predicate and express a complete thought. Dependent clauses have a subject and a predicate but do not express a complete thought because of a conjunction like “because.”

Please sir can you explain the types of clauses

Sir can you teach me some tricks to identify phrases and clauses tomorrow is my exam

I still dont understand it

Amudha Godfrey Fernando

Can u give the answer As soon as possible

Which answer?

Plz provide some worksheet and test papers to Solve and gain more marks

I want to give test of adverb clauses and phrases

What is a phrase?

A phrase is a group of words containing a subject OR predicate (or object) but not a subject AND a predicate. A subject AND a predicate makes a clause.

There are lots of different types of phrases. For example, the prepositional phrase, which provides information about the location of the subject or object in time and/or space.

I left my folder under the desk .

This is a prepositional phrase providing more information about the location of an object (the folder) in relation to another object (the desk).

Phrases often provide additional information and are not essential to the sentence construction, unlike the clause, which is the essential part of the sentence, I left in the above example.

Chirag Shah

Very nice work Mr Morton

Thanks a lot. This helped me. Tomorrow is my exam and this is just the right thing i need.. Thanks a lot! Have a nice day, Mr. Morton. 😀

This is very useful for learning.it teaches us more.it is very good job.I am 7th grade.

i liked the worksheets. it was good.

Alegbe Joyce

sir what is the difference between a subordinate and coordinating clause?

Can you have a dependent clause without subject or verb even though it does not have a complete thought?

No, by definition a clause must have a subject and a predicate. Conjunctions are what make them dependent.

mubasher ktk

Sir I am confused in sentence , phrase and clause. Give me 10 of 5 examples of each in a same sentence

1. This is a clause. 2. Clauses have subjects and predicates. 3. Clauses can stand by themselves and express a complete thought. 4. Some sentences have multiple clauses. 5. Sentences with just one clause are called “simple sentences.”

Phrases 1. The frequently used phrases 2. cannot stand alone 3. The red, red horse

Well, I hope you get the idea.

Thanks a lot sir. This is really helpful for the second language learners.

this is kind of tough sir. any extra helps??

Tell me whether it is phrase or clause in following sentence Because of the cost which I bought from the pot pouri

because of the cost which i bought from the poy pouri Hey Jamal, Jamal first ,the punctuation of your sentence is wrong.It should be like – Because of the cost, which i bought from pot pouri. so, this sentence is a subordinate clause.

logan waldschmidt

could you please make a dependent and independent clause about how to become a ninjas please today

Dear sir, I am confused between Past Perfect and Present Perfect tense.

What confuses you?

Lavish Beniwal

What is the difference between phrase and dependent clause?

A clause has a subject and a predicate. A phrase does not.

Help me in clauses

How can I help you?

dharmendra shakya

sir! am confused…. whether what’s the difference between “”Tense & Sentence”””I didn’t to this day such teacher…. who could able off my confusion…. I want a group created in that we all of student could well study sir…. my fb id “”Dharmendra shakya ….u can find my 8445950373

Sentences are grammatical units containing at least one subject and a predicate.

Predicates are verbs. Tense is related to verbs.

It is well known that verbs express actions, but it is lesser known that verbs have the extra role of showing time.

We conjugate verbs to show time. This is called verb tense .

Since every sentence must have a verb, and every verb has a tense, every sentence has a tense.

Let’s Look at an Example:

Mr. Morton walked to the store.

This sentence has one predicate, which is the verb walked .

Walked is the past tense verb form of walk . The past tense form of a verb shows that the action occurred in the past. It is usually formed by adding “-ed” to the end of the verb.

If you want to know more about verbs and verb tense, or subjects and predicates, you should check out my free parts of speech web app . I think Units 2 and 6 would be of interest to you.

Best wishes!

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Shuvankar Biswas

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Ya Jahou Bah

Hi…………. thank you very much……….. you helped me alot. Tomorrow is my exams and I really needed to know more about these things………….. once again thank you may GOD bless you……………. I am in 8th grade……………. thirteen years old.

You’re worksheets are very useful.!! Good job !

*Your (Come on, you’re on a grammar website.)

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types of clauses worksheet pdf

Clauses Worksheets

Clauses worksheets practice.

This is the clauses worksheets section. A Clause is a group of words that contains a verb and its subject. There are two kinds of clauses, independent and dependent. An independent clause expresses a complete thought and can stand by itself as a sentence. A dependent or subordinate clause does not express a complete thought and cannot stand alone as a sentence. A dependent clause is a group of words with a subject and a verb. It cannot stand alone. Our clauses worksheets help students understand the different types of clauses.

Our Clauses worksheets are free to download and easy to access in PDF format. Use these Clauses worksheets in school or at home.

a. Grades K-5 Clauses Worksheets b. Grades 6-8 Clauses Worksheets c. Grades 9-12 Clauses Worksheets

Here is a graphic preview for all the kindergarten, 1st grade, 2nd grade, 3rd grade, 4th grade, and 5th grade Clauses Worksheets. Click on the image to display our clauses worksheets.

What is a Dependent Clause? Worksheet

What is a Dependent Clause? Worksheet

What is an Independent Clause? Worksheet

What is an Independent Clause? Worksheet

Dependent and Independent Clauses Worksheet

Dependent and Independent Clauses Worksheet

Adding a Dependent Clause Worksheet

Adding a Dependent Clause Worksheet

Adding an Independent Clause Worksheet

Adding an Independent Clause Worksheet

Adding Subordinate Clauses Worksheet

Adding Subordinate Clauses Worksheet

Grades 6-8 Clauses Worksheets

Here is a graphic preview for all the 6th grade, 7th grade and 8th grade Clauses Worksheets. Click on the image to display our clauses worksheets.

Identifying Clauses Worksheet

Identifying Clauses Worksheet

Writing Sentences with Clauses Worksheet

Writing Sentences with Clauses Worksheet

Identifying and Writing Clauses Worksheet

Identifying and Writing Clauses Worksheet

Dependent or Independent Clauses Worksheet

Dependent or Independent Clauses Worksheet

Completing Dependent Clauses Worksheet

Completing Dependent Clauses Worksheet

Main and Subordinate Clauses Worksheet

Main and Subordinate Clauses Worksheet

Finding Adjective Clauses Worksheet

Finding Adjective Clauses Worksheet

Finding Adverb Clauses Worksheet

Finding Adverb Clauses Worksheet

Finding Noun Clauses Worksheet

Finding Noun Clauses Worksheet

Grades 9-12 Clauses Worksheets

Here is a graphic preview for all the 9th grade, 10th grade, 11th grade, and 12th grade Clauses Worksheets. Click on the image to display our clauses worksheets.

Adding Dependent and Independent Clauses Worksheet

Finding independent and dependent clauses worksheet, writing sentences with subordinate clauses worksheet.

Writing Sentences with Subordinate Clauses Worksheet

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Home > English Language Arts Worksheets > Clauses and Phrases

Clauses are the building blocks of good, clear writing. In prevailing theories of English grammar, the hierarchy is: words (parts of speech), phrases, and then clauses. Clauses are a word group that contain two parts of speech a subject and a verb. The subject is the person, place, or thing in the sentence. The verb tells you what the subject is doing or being. There are clauses that are complete sentences and those that are not. We have a complete section on the classification of clauses found in our Independent and Dependent Clause worksheets. There are also adjective and adverbial clauses that function as an adjective or adverb in a sentence. There are also noun clauses that complement the subject in a sentence. There are clauses where words are purposeful left out to create a pattern or form of logic for a sentence called elliptical clauses.

Get free worksheets in your inbox, print clause worksheets, click the buttons to print each worksheet and associated answer key., find the subordinate.

Underline the subordinate clause in each sentence below. Box in the coordinating conjunction.

Print Now!

Commas and Introductory Elements

An introductory element is a word, phrase, or clause that begins a sentence, appearing before the main clause.

Print

Identification Worksheet

Identify the subjects and predicates in each clause. On the line, indicate the number of clauses in each sentence.

A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a predicate. The main (independent) form expresses a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence.

Joining Them

Join the sentences below into single sentences by turning one or more independent clauses into subordinating or coordinating form. Do not remove any information as your transform the sentences.

Finding Subordinates

Where is that pesky subordinate hiding? You may need to read them several times.

Fill in the Blank Story Time

The story below is missing important clauses. Fill in the blanks with thoughts to complete the sentences.

Act Like Adjectives

Rewrite each set of sentences so that it is a single sentence using a relative clause.

What is the Relative Modifying?

Each sentence below contains a relative clause. Underline it and make it stand out. Then circle the noun that it modified.

Creating Subordinate Clauses

On a separate page, join the sentences below into single sentences by turning one or more independent clauses into subordinating or coordinating forms.

Adverb Clauses

Like all clauses, an adverb form has a subject and a verb, but because it contains a subordinating conjunction, it cannot stand alone as a sentence.

Identifying Clauses

A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a predicate. The main (independent ) form can be used to express a complete thought and can stand alone as a sentence.

Introductory Clauses

Add commas where needed to set off the clauses in the sentences below.

Relative Clauses and What they Modify

Each sentence below contains a relative clause. What does this bad boy modify? Write the word on the line.

This is more like a flash flood quiz.

You will start by identifying where these groups of words reside within sentences. You will learn how to connect these groups of words to form new sentences. We will look at how you can move these around to your advantage when writing or editing your own work to help them have more punch and keep readers engaged in what you are saying. The following collection of worksheets offers activities to help teach your students how to construct, identify, and punctuate the different types of clauses. Answer keys have been provided for the instructor, but please note that in many cases the students' answers will vary, so those answer keys should just be used as a rough guideline rather than as a definitive answer. Instructors may want to structure their lesson plans accordingly.

What Is the Difference Between Phrases & Clauses?

Every sentence is composed of either phrases, clauses, or a combination of both. Simply put, the two categories are groups of words that help writers avoid fragments and punctuate sentences correctly. There’s also a fair bit of overlap, which makes it tricky to differentiate between them at times.

A phrase is a set of words that can include a partial verb or subject but not both. It can also exist without a subject and verb. Moreover, the subject in a phrase doesn’t carry out the action of a verb. In short, you can think of a phrase as any collection of words that doesn’t combine a verb and a subject.

Types of Phrases

In general, a phrase includes information that makes a sentence more engaging. It can describe actions, locations, nouns, and other stuff to give the reader a clearer idea of what a particular sentence is about.

Noun Forms:

As the name suggests, a noun phrase works like a noun within a sentence. It contains a noun along with adjectives to describe that noun. Below is an example.

Many beautiful little flowers are blooming in my backyard.

Verb Forms:

In this type of phrase, a verb is accompanied by its modifiers. It functions similar to how a noun phrase works. Consider the example below.

She has been working non-stop since the morning.

Prepositional Phrases

Standalone prepositions have the responsibility of describing a noun or pronoun. In the same way, a prepositional phrase carries a preposition that describes a particular noun (or pronoun) and any actions that it might take. The following example will make it clearer.

The new coffee shop is going to be set up close to my place.

A clause can simply be defined as "a group of words that includes both a subject and a verb." There can be multiple clauses (and phrases) within a sentence. You can think of clauses as being the main portion of any sentence. In the absence of a proper clause(s), a sentence is nothing more than a random arrangement of words that doesn’t have any meaning on its own. To put it another way, a sentence is just a phrase when there’s no clause around!

Types of Clauses

Below are the various types of clauses.

Main/Independent

Any clause that can make sense and convey some meaning to the reader on its own is called a main or independent clause. You can consider any independent clause as a proper and complete sentence. Take a look at the example below.

I love chocolate chip cookies.

Dependent Form

Also called "subordinate clauses," dependent clauses are a major reason why so many people tend to confuse phrases and clauses. These things rely on the independent clause(s) to make any sense to the reader.

Despite containing a verb and subject, dependent clauses cannot express a complete thought on their own. To do that, they have to connect to an independent clause that includes a coordinating or subordinating conjunction.

Below are the major types of dependent clauses.

Relative -  Relative clauses usually start with a relative pronoun like who, what, which, where, whose, whom, etc.

Adjective - An adjective clause works like an adjective. It functions by describing a noun through its verb and subject.

Noun -  Similar to an adjective clause, a noun clause works like a noun in a sentence. However, in contrast to a noun phrase, it carries both a subject and a verb.

Adverbial -  Verbs in a sentence can be altered by an adverbial clause. It starts with a subordinating conjunction. An adverbial clause also has the ability to act like an adverb.

Phrases vs. Clauses -  A single clause can be considered a sentence, though there are exceptions. However, you can’t make up a sentence from just one phrase. Even though phrases are crucial in adding meaning to a sentence, they cannot create one on their own!

151 FREE Clauses Worksheets

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FREE Clauses Worksheets

Here you can find 151 worksheets that deal with the topic of clauses . this section is also divided into subsections which can assist you in locating the right activity for your students. this worksheet is for pre-intermediate students who need more practice using time clauses . all the teacher’s notes and materials are included for this fifteen minute practice activity so it is easy to include in your lesson plan. there are other worksheets about clauses too and since they are all free and easy to print, you may as well look at several different ones before deciding what would be best for your students. if you have your own worksheets on clauses, you can upload them to the website for other teachers to use. there are different types of clauses that students will learn throughout their english studies. it is important to focus on one or two types of clauses at a time so that students do not become overwhelmed by the difference structures and uses. certain clauses can be introduced in lower level classes while others are best saved for more advanced students. what you include in your course will obviously be greatly influenced by the level and age range of your students. read more... ...less.

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Clauses Worksheets

With its marvelous ways of decoding and deconstructing sentences, the English language never ceases to intrigue. Clauses are greatly symbolic of this aspect of the language. Understanding dependent and independent clauses greatly fuels the process of ELA, especially the writing and reading modules. From clear classifications to easy-to-grasp definitions and examples, our collection of printable clauses worksheets has a lot going for it. Recommended for students of grade 6 through grade 10. We offer some free worksheets too. Give them a try!

Dependent or Independent Clause?

Dependent or Independent Clause?

Watch children embrace this exercise with the sort of enthusiasm that they usually reserve for soccer! Let 7th grade children identify the underlined part of each sentence as an independent or dependent clause.

Worksheet

Identifying Dependent Clauses

Let 6th grade and 7th grade children's knowledge of clauses turn from ordinary to top-rate, with this identifying-dependent-clause worksheet pdf! They read ten sentences, and underline the dependent clauses.

Types of Clauses | Chart

Types of Clauses | Chart

Give the young talent a rousing start with this greatly informative chart! It first defines and exemplifies an independent and dependent clause, and further divides the latter into three categories.

Chart

Identifying Independent Clauses

This printable exercise makes children feel at ease, while they identify the independent clause in each sentence. There are 10 sentences, each of which has an independent clause. This is fun incarnate, isn't it?

Combine using Relative Pronouns

Combine using Relative Pronouns

It's no secret that practicing splitting and combining clauses is at the heart of the clause-concept, and rightly so, this worksheet for grade 7, grade 8, and grade 9 gets students to combine two independent clauses, using a relative pronoun.

Combine Two Independent Clauses

Combine Two Independent Clauses

How about combining two independent clauses with a comma and a conjunction? Try this pdf worksheet on combining-independent-clauses and add-on to your practice.

Identifying Noun Clauses

Identifying Noun Clauses

Thanks to their popularity, noun clauses often cause a flurry of excitement among children. Watch the young clause-specialists in action, as they underline the noun clause in each of the sentences.

Adjective Clauses | Relative Clauses

Adjective Clauses | Relative Clauses

7th grade and 8th grade learners become emboldened, as they embark on an exciting journey of underlining the adjective clauses in this printable exercise. They also find which nouns these clauses modify.

Split into two Independent Clauses

Split into two Independent Clauses

This independent clause worksheet pdf thrives on the tremendous upgrade and practice it offers young learners. Children rewrite each sentence into two independent clauses, eliminating the relative clauses.

Add a Dependent Clause

Add a Dependent Clause

Adding dependent clauses to independent clauses is a great way to easily bring the clause advantage to your writing. In this pdf worksheet, children get to practice this skill, so they achieve perfection in their clause-learning.

Add an Independent Clause

Add an Independent Clause

The most exemplary way to overcome learning deficiencies in any field is to keep at it by repeated practice. Here, students add independent clauses to dependent clauses, in an effort to complete their clause-practice in style.

Underline Adverbial Clauses

Underline Adverbial Clauses

Sit back and enjoy as middle school children prove they have an old head on their young shoulders! They identify the adverbial clause in each sentence, and substantiate the fact that nothing helps as devoted practice.

Complete the Story with Adverbial Clauses

Complete the Story with Adverbial Clauses

Completing a story with adverbial clauses is an amusing assignment. The story "How does a garden grow?" is an interesting read, and kids have fun filling in the blanks with adverb clauses.

Noun, Adjective and Adverbial Clauses

Noun, Adjective and Adverbial Clauses

We bet 9th grade and 10th grade students are bent to prove they are really gifted when it comes to identifying clauses. In this printable worksheet, they identify each underlined part as a noun, adjective, or adverb clause, before they celebrate success.

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Clauses describes how to identify and correctly use an independent or dependent (subordinate) clause. It also explains the difference between noun, adjective, and adverb clauses.

There are several suggestions in the “Options for Lesson” section that you might want to take advantage of for your class. One option is to increase or decrease the number of sentences for the activity according to the needs of your students. You could also have students label the type of clause for each sentence in the activity. Another option is to allow the class to vote on the most creative sentence (of funniest, strangest, etc.) from the activity worksheet.

Description

Additional information, what our clauses lesson plan includes.

Lesson Objectives and Overview: Clauses teaches students how to identify clauses and distinguish between independent and dependent clauses. They will also be able to determine whether a clause is a noun, adjective, or adverb clause.

The lesson contains three content pages that explain how to identify and define a clause. The lesson defines independent clause and dependent clause first. Students will learn how to distinguish between the two based on the rules for each. They will also learn some subordinating conjunctions that will help them remember when a clause is dependent.

Students will also learn about the noun clause, adjective clause, and adverb clause. The lesson defines and explains each type and provides some examples to analyze.

CREATE THE SENTENCE ACTIVITY

Students can work by themselves, with a partner, or in a group for the activity. They will cut apart the words and phrases in the table on the worksheet. Then they will have to create 25 sentences by arranging the words. They can use the words and phrases multiple times. Their sentences do not have to make sense, but students must write the sentences correctly. They can write all the sentences on a separate sheet of lined paper. All the students will share some of their sentences with the class.

TYPES OF CLAUSES PRACTICE WORKSHEET

There are several sections on the practice worksheet. The first section contains 10 sentences. Students must circle the independent clause and underline the dependent clause in each sentence. The second section requires students to circle the noun clause in each of five sentences. Then they must circle the adjective clause in five sentences. Finally, they will circle the adverb clause in five sentences.

CLAUSE TYPES HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT

For the homework assignment, students will use a book, magazine, or newspaper to find specific sentences. They will write three sentences for each section that follows the bolded instructions. There are five sections total.

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Clauses Exercises

Sentences are made up of phrases and clauses. Both phrases and clauses are classified into different types based on their function in a sentence. While phrases are classified into many types, such as noun phrases , adjective phrases , adverbial phrases , participle phrases , infinitive phrases , prepositional phrases and so on, clauses are mainly classified into two – main clause and subordinate clause . They are then further classified into adverb clauses , adjective clauses , conditional clauses, relative clauses and so on.

This article aims to check your understanding of clauses. Go through the exercises and find out if you know clauses and their functions well.

Clauses Exercises with Answers

Given below are a few exercises to check your understanding of clauses.

Exercise 1 – Identify the clause

Read the sentences and underline the subordinate clause.

  • People who pay their debts are trusted.
  • We cannot go while it is snowing.
  • Raj thinks that I have made a mistake.
  • Tina bought some chocolates which she wanted to give her brother.
  • After I reached home, it started raining.
  • Mani was asked to come to the office though he was not keeping well.
  • All that glitters is not gold.
  • Tim is the nicest person I’ve ever met.
  • She did not go to school as she was sick.
  • This is the boy who got suspended last week.
  • Although I was not in the mood for a movie, I watched ‘Miracle in Cell No. 7’ with my friend.
  • Olena likes stories that have fairies in them.
  • Riya was sure that Tia would come today.
  • Nobody knew who had come first in the race.
  • The teacher gave the students another worksheet as soon as they completed the first one.

Answers –

  • We cannot go while it is snowing .
  • Raj thinks that I have made a mistake .
  • Tina bought some chocolates which she wanted to give her brother .
  • After I reached home , it started raining.
  • Tim is the nicest person I’ve ever met .
  • This is the boy who got suspended last week .
  • Although I was not in the mood for a movie , I watched ‘Miracle in Cell No. 7’ with my friend.
  • Olena likes stories that have fairies in them .
  • Riya was sure that Tia would come today .
  • Nobody knew who had come first in the race .
  • The teacher gave the students another worksheet as soon as they completed the first one .

Exercise 2 – Identify the type of clause

Read the sentences and identify the clause and its type.

  • You may sit wherever you like.
  • As she was not there, I spoke to her sister.
  • Will you wait till I return?
  • I fear that I shall fail.
  • I do not know what he wants.
  • I think you have made a mistake.
  • Mary had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow.
  • Here is the copy you want.
  • She never does anything that is stupid.
  • The house that I live in belongs to my grandfather.
  • You may sit wherever you like . – Adverb Clause
  • As she was not there , I spoke to her sister. – Adverb Clause
  • Will you wait till I return ? – Adverb Clause
  • I fear that I shall fail . – Noun Clause
  • I do not know what he wants . – Noun Clause
  • I think you have made a mistake . – Noun Clause
  • Mary had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow . – Adjective Clause
  • Here is the copy you want . – Adjective Clause
  • She never does anything unless her parents allow it . – Adjective Clause
  • The house that I live in belongs to my grandfather. – Adjective Clause

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  1. Clauses worksheet

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  2. Clauses & types of Sentences Worksheets by Eden of Knowledge

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  3. CLAUSES

    types of clauses worksheet pdf

  4. Clauses worksheet

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  5. Parts of a Sentence Worksheets

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  6. Clauses, Free PDF Download

    types of clauses worksheet pdf

VIDEO

  1. If Clauses/Conditional Clauses

  2. CLAUSE AND PHRASE II TYPES OF SENTENCES

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  4. What are Clauses?/ What are the types of clauses?/ When should we introduce clauses to kids?

  5. Clauses

  6. Adjective Clauses Worksheet

COMMENTS

  1. PDF Types of Clauses

    On-line Tutorial Independent clauses contain both a subject and a verb and can stand alone as a sentence. Example: Jet lag affects most long distance travelers. Dependent clauses contain both a subject and a verb, but cannot stand alone as a sentence.

  2. PDF Independent and Dependent Clauses

    Subject (noun) + predicate (verb) = clause There are two main types of clauses: independent and dependent. Both of these types of clauses have a subject and predicate, but the difference is that independent clauses express a complete thought, which means that they can stand on their own as complete sentences. Independent Clauses

  3. Clause Worksheets

    L.7.1.A Is It an Independent Clause or a Dependent Clause? Time to identify the clause: independent or dependent? Grade Levels: 6th - 8th Grade, Grades K-12 CCSS Code (s): L.7.1.A Noun Clauses: Acting as a Noun Here's a worksheet on finding the function of a noun phrase in a sentence! Grade Levels:

  4. Clause Worksheets

    Our free, printable worksheets on types of clauses such as independent, dependent, noun, adjective, and adverbial clauses encompass diverse exercises to provide a multidimensional exposure on how these clauses work within a sentence to combine additional chunks of information.

  5. Clauses and Phrases

    Phrases A phrase is a group of words related to the subject, predicate, or object. Phrases do not contain a subject and a predicate, or we would call them clauses. Phrases provide additional information about subjects, predicates, and / or objects. Understanding how phrases work is helpful when analyzing sentence structure. Examples

  6. Englishlinx.com

    a. Grades K-5 Clauses Worksheets b. Grades 6-8 Clauses Worksheets c. Grades 9-12 Clauses Worksheets Grades K-5 Clauses Worksheets Here is a graphic preview for all the kindergarten, 1st grade, 2nd grade, 3rd grade, 4th grade, and 5th grade Clauses Worksheets. Click on the image to display our clauses worksheets. What is a Dependent Clause?

  7. PDF Chapter 6 PHRASES, CLAUSES, AND SENTENCES

    The four basic types of sentences—simple, compound, complex, and compound-complex— use phrases and clauses in varying degrees of complexity. The Phrase phrase is any group of related words that, unlike a sentence, has no subject-predicate combination. The words in a phrase act together so that the phrase itself functions as a single part of speech.

  8. PDF Clauses and Phrases Worksheet

    Clauses and Phrases Worksheet I. Put (parentheses) around the phrase or phrases in each sentence: *** phrases often start with prepositions and have an object *** phrases can show you what a plane does to a cloud *** phrases can go wherever a rabbit (or a squirrel) can go *** phrases DO NOT have a subject or a verb!

  9. PDF Clause Review

    There are two kinds of clauses, independent and dependent. An independent clause expresses a complete thought and can stand by itself as a sentence. A dependent clause does not express a complete thought and cannot stand alone as a sentence. Directions: Identify each sentence below as an independent clause or a dependent clause.

  10. PDF Independent and Dependent Clauses Worksheet

    Independent and Dependent Clauses Worksheet . Identification . Identify the following sentences as either dependent (DC) or independent (IC). 1. I went to the park . 2. Sandra and Lara have been good friends since first grade. 3. Although Shaina likes Mexican, Iraqi, Somali, and Italian food 4. After swimming in the ocean 5.

  11. PDF Phrases & Clauses

    Adverbial Clauses ! According to Correct Writing, a dependent clause that functions like an adverb, that is it modifies a verb, an adjective, an adverb, or the whole idea expressed in the independent clause. ! Used to show time, place, cause, purpose, result, condition, concession, manner, or comparison.

  12. PDF PHRASE vs. CLAUSE

    In order to punctuate sentences correctly and avoid fragments, we need to know the difference between two kinds of word groups: phrases and clauses. We can see the difference in the following two groups of words: 1. the bus to Eastmont Mall

  13. Independent and Dependent Clauses Worksheets

    These worksheets from Easy Teacher encourage students to write multiple sentences at one time that use both types of clauses. By defining how dependent clauses typically connect with one or more independent clauses to form sentences, you have the right grammar tool to make your kids literary stars long before they reach high school.

  14. Clause and Phrase Worksheets

    The following collection of worksheets offers activities to help teach your students how to construct, identify, and punctuate the different types of clauses. Answer keys have been provided for the instructor, but please note that in many cases the students' answers will vary, so those answer keys should just be used as a rough guideline rather ...

  15. Clause Types: 19 Worksheets With Answers

    EXERCISE 1: Identify the independent and dependent clauses from each of the examples. EXERCISE 2: List the features of dependent and independent clauses. EXERCISE 3: Answer the given questions to test your knowledge of clauses. EXERCISE 4: Identify the functions of clauses in general sentences.

  16. PDF THERE ARE TWO MAIN TYPES OF CLAUSES

    independent and dependent clauses. We describe both in this dependent clauses Dependent clauses contain a subject and verb but cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. They must be linked to an independent clause to create a complete sentence. There are three types of dependent clauses, all of which express different information. NOMINAL CLAUSE

  17. 151 FREE Clauses Worksheets

    151 FREE Clauses Worksheets BusyTeacher Home » Grammar » Clauses Here you can find 151 worksheets that deal with the topic of clauses. This section is also divided into subsections which can assist you in locating the right activity for your students. This worksheet is for pre-intermediate students who need more practice using time clauses.

  18. Clause Worksheets

    Types of Clauses | Chart Give the young talent a rousing start with this greatly informative chart! It first defines and exemplifies an independent and dependent clause, and further divides the latter into three categories. Identifying Independent Clauses

  19. PDF A Student's Guide to Clause Types

    Main clause Part of a sentence which contains 2 or more clause components. Clause components are: subject; verb; object; complement; adverbial (Adapted from Seely, 2009) Subordinate clause Part of a sentence which 'can act as the subject, object, complement, or adverbial of the main clause' (Seely, 2009, p. 29) Dependent clause

  20. PDF Packet 4 Phrases and Clauses

    There are two types of clauses. Examples: 1. The play was funny. 2. Since the play was funny. Read and complete all exercises in this packet. Take test for Packet 4. PHRASES - a phrase is a group of related words. It does not contain a subject and a verb. There are different types of phrases. Prepositional Phrase - (prep + noun/pron)

  21. Clauses worksheet

    1. Maria bought some flowers which she wanted to give her mother. Adjective clause Adverb clause Noun clause 2. I don't know the reason why she hates me. Adjective clause Adverb clause Noun clause 3. He drove fast so that he might reach the airport in time. Adjective clause Adverb clause Noun clause 4.

  22. Clauses, Free PDF Download

    TYPES OF CLAUSES PRACTICE WORKSHEET. There are several sections on the practice worksheet. The first section contains 10 sentences. Students must circle the independent clause and underline the dependent clause in each sentence. The second section requires students to circle the noun clause in each of five sentences.

  23. PDF Subordinating Conjunctions and Subordinate Clauses

    and therefore, they do not make clauses subordinate, so clauses linked with coordinating . conjunctions remain independent. Activity 1: Recognizing Subordinate Clauses. Identify any subordinate clauses, and underli ne subordinating conjunctions. An answer key for this activity is included at the end of this handout. 1. the bar fight finished ...

  24. Clauses Exercises

    While phrases are classified into many types, such as noun phrases, adjective phrases, adverbial phrases, participle phrases, infinitive phrases, prepositional phrases and so on, clauses are mainly classified into two - main clause and subordinate clause.